Notes on contributors
in Worlding the south

Notes on contributors

Aaron Bartlett is a PhD candidate in English at the University of Maryland. His research focuses on nineteenth-century British poetry and textual culture.

Elleke Boehmer is Professor of World Literature in English at the University of Oxford. Among numerous works on colonial and postcolonial studies, her most recent monographs include Indian Arrivals 1870–1915: Networks of British Empire (2015) and Postcolonial Poetics: 21st-Century Critical Readings (2018). She is also a novelist and short-story writer, most recently of The Shouting in the Dark (2015) and To the Volcano (2019). In 2020, she held a British Academy Senior Research Fellowship for the project ‘Southern Imagining’.

Manu Samriti Chander is Associate Professor of English at Rutgers University, Newark. He has edited a collection of the short fiction of Egbert Martin (2014), and a special issue of European Romantic Review on ‘Abolitionist Interruptions’ (2017, ed. with Patricia A. Matthew). His monograph Brown Romantics: Poetry and Nationalism in the Global Nineteenth Century was published in 2017.

Sarah Comyn is Assistant Professor and Ad Astra Fellow at University College Dublin. She has most recently published Political Economy and the Novel: A Literary History of ‘Homo Economicus’ (2018) and Early Public Libraries and Colonial Citizenship in the British Southern Hemisphere (2019, with Lara Atkin et al.). She is currently working on a monograph entitled A New Reading Public: The Mechanics’ Institute on the Goldfields of Victoria, 1851–1901.

Michelle Elleray is Associate Professor of English at the University of Guelph. She has published extensively on queer film, settler literature, and Victorian literature of empire. Her recent book Victorian Coral Islands (2020) examines the intersections of missionary culture and empire in mid-Victorian adventure fiction.

Porscha Fermanis is Professor of Romantic Literature at University College Dublin. Her most recent books are Early Public Libraries and Colonial Citizenship in the British Southern Hemisphere (2019, with Lara Atkin et al.) and Romantic Pasts: History, Fiction, and Feeling in Britain and Ireland, 1790–1850 (forthcoming 2021). She is currently the Principal Investigator of the European Research Council project, ‘SouthHem’, and is working on a monograph entitled The Transcolonial Imaginary in Southern Settler Fiction, 1820–1890.

Jennifer Fuller is Assistant Professor at Jackson State University. Along with a number of recent articles on nineteenth-century writing on the Pacific by R. M. Ballantyne, Louis Becke, and others, she has published Dark Paradise: Pacific Islands in the Nineteenth-Century British Imagination (2016), which explores how British authors used depictions of the Pacific to interrogate British identity. She is currently working on a book that explores views of islands in popular culture.

Ken Gelder is Professor of English at the University of Melbourne. His books include Popular Fiction: The Logics and Practices of a Literary Field (2004), Subcultures: Cultural Histories and Social Practice (2007), After the Celebration: Australian Fiction 1989–2007 (2009, with Paul Salzman), The Colonial Journals and the Emergence of Australian Literary Culture (2014, with Rachael Weaver), Colonial Australian Fiction: Character Types, Social Formations and the Colonial Economy (2017, with Rachael Weaver), and The Colonial Kangaroo Hunt (2020, with Rachael Weaver).

Nikki Hessell is Associate Professor of English at Victoria University of Wellington. Her books include Literary Authors, Parliamentary Reporters: Johnson, Coleridge, Hazlitt, Dickens (2012) and Romantic Literature and the Colonised World: Lessons from Indigenous Translations (2018). Her current project is ‘Sensitive Negotiations: Indigenous Diplomacy and British Romantic Poetry’, funded by the Royal Society of New Zealand.

Ingrid Horrocks is Associate Professor in English and Creative Writing at Massey University. She is the author of Women Wanderers and the Writing of Mobility, 1784–1814 (2017) and scholarly editions of works by Mary Wollstonecraft and Charlotte Smith, as well as co-editor of the creative-critical collection Extraordinary Anywhere: Essays on Place from Aotearoa New Zealand (2016). She is also a travel writer and poet. Her latest book of narrative nonfiction is Where We Swim (2021).

Anna Johnston is Associate Professor in English Literature and Deputy Director of the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities at the University of Queensland. Her books include Missionary Writing and Empire, 1800–1860 (2003), The Paper War: Morality, Print Culture, and Power in Colonial New South Wales (2011), and Travelling Home, ‘Walkabout’ Magazine and Mid-Twentieth-Century Australia (2016, with Mitchell Rolls). Eliza Hamilton Dunlop: Writing from the Colonial Frontier (ed. with Elizabeth Webby) is forthcoming from University of Sydney Press.

Hlonipha Mokoena is Associate Professor at the Wits Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (WiSER). She has published extensively on South African intellectual history, including the monograph Magema Fuze: The Making of a Kholwa Intellectual (2011).

Grace Moore is Senior Lecturer in Victorian Studies at the University of Otago. Her books include Dickens and Empire: Discourses of Class, Race and Colonialism in the Works of Charles Dickens (2004), Pirates and Mutineers of the Nineteenth-Century: Swashbucklers and Swindlers (2011), The Victorian Novel in Context (2012), and Victorian Environments: Acclimatizing to Change in British Domestic and Colonial Culture (2018, ed. with Michelle J. Smith). Her current book project, Arcady in Flames, is a study of the representation of bushfires in nineteenth-century Australian settler literature.

Lindsey O’Neil is a PhD candidate in English at the University of Maryland. Her dissertation-in-progress is entitled ‘Reparative Forms: Poetry and Psychology from the Fin de Siècle to WWI’.

Peter Otto is Redmond Barry Distinguished Professor of Literature at the University of Melbourne, Director of the Research Unit in Enlightenment, Romanticism, and Contemporary Culture, and a member of the Australian Academy of the Humanities. His recent publications include Multiplying Worlds: Romanticism, Modernity, and the Emergence of Virtual Reality (2011) and William Blake: 21st-Century Oxford Authors (2018). He is currently completing a book on ‘William Blake, Secularisation, and the History of Imagination’, while also working on a project, funded by the Australian Research Council, on ‘Architectures of Imagination: Bodies, Buildings, Fictions, and Worlds’.

Jason Rudy is Professor of English at the University of Maryland. His books include Electric Meters: Victorian Physiological Poetics (2009) and Imagined Homelands: British Poetry in the Colonies (2017). Along with a special issue on Victorian Cosmopolitanisms (2010, ed. with Tanya Agathocleous), he has published widely on Romantic and Victorian poetry.

Fariha Shaikh is Lecturer in Victorian Literature at the University of Birmingham. Her publications include Nineteenth-Century Settler Emigration in British Literature and Art (2018). She is currently working on a monograph on the nineteenth-century opium wars.

Matthew Shum is a Research Associate in the English Department at the University of Stellenbosch. He has published extensively on imperial culture in colonial South Africa, most recently a monograph entitled Improvisations of Empire: Thomas Pringle in Scotland, the Cape Colony and London, 1789–1834 (2020).

Jane Stafford is Professor of English at Victoria University of Wellington. Recent books include Maoriland: New Zealand Literature, 1872–1914 (2006, with Mark Williams), The Oxford History of the Novel in English, Vol. 9: The World Novel to 1950 (2016, ed. with Ralph Crane and Mark Williams), and Colonial Literature and the Native Author: Indigeneity and Empire (2017).

Lindy Stiebel is Professor Emeritus of English Studies at the University of KwaZulu-Natal. She is the author of Imagining Africa: Landscape in H. Rider Haggard’s African Romances (2001), Thomas Baines and the Great Map (2001, ed.), Still Beating the Drum: Critical Perspectives on Lewis Nkosi (2005/6, ed. with Liz Gunner), Henry Rider Haggard (2009), Thomas Baines: Exploring Tropical Australia 1855 to 1857 (2012, ed. with Jane Carruthers), and A Literary Guide to KwaZulu-Natal (2017, with Niall McNulty).

Justin Thompson is a PhD candidate in English at the University of Maryland. His dissertation-in-progress is entitled ‘Women Write the Empire: Genre, Gender, and Governance in the Age of High Imperialism’.

Clara Tuite is Professor of English at the University of Melbourne, where she is also a Co-Director of the Research Unit in Enlightenment, Romanticism and Contemporary Culture. Her most recent books are Lord Byron and Scandalous Celebrity (2015), Byron in Context (2020, ed.), and, with Claudia L. Johnson, 30 Great Myths about Jane Austen (2020). She is currently working on an Australian Research Council-funded project, with Gillian Russell, on Regency Romanticism and flash culture in Britain, Ireland, and Australia.

Rachael Weaver is an Australian Research Council Senior Research Fellow in the Australian Centre at the University of Melbourne. She is the author of The Criminal of the Century (2006) and, with Ken Gelder, The Colonial Journals and the Emergence of Australian Literary Culture (2014), Colonial Australian Fiction: Character Types, Social Formations and the Colonial Economy (2017), and The Colonial Kangaroo Hunt (2020).

Worlding the south

Nineteenth-century literary culture and the southern settler colonies

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