Open Access (free)
Entanglements and ambiguities
Saurabh Dube

centrality of language and historical experience; the principle of individuality (while often pursuing a universal history); and acute inclinations toward hermeneutical understandings. This is to say also distinct formations and discrete intimations of what Isaiah Berlin has notably described as the “Counter-Enlightenment,” “the great river of romanticism” running from the eighteenth

in Subjects of modernity
Alexis Heraclides and Ada Dialla

in Western Thought from the Renaissance to Romanticism (Pittsburgh: Pittsburgh University Press, 1972); P. Keal, European Conquest and the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: The Moral Backwardness of International Society (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003), 67. 18 Gong, The Standard of ‘Civilization’ in International Society , 55–7; A. Anghie, ‘Finding the Peripheries: Sovereignty and Colonialism

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century
Alexis Heraclides and Ada Dialla

might still have been savages and idolators.… The Modern Greek is the descendant of those glorious beings’. 56 It was a great advantage to the Greek cause that Europe and America were then under the spell of classicism, which venerated the ancient Greeks, as well as romanticism, making the uprising appear a most romantic episode. 57 For the Russians, the Greeks striving for freedom were the descendants of the venerated Byzantines (to whom they owed

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century
Open Access (free)
Art as the ‘organ of philosophy’
Andrew Bowie

fact is, as Schelling makes clear, that there is no individual solution to these dilemmas, though it would at the same time be a mistake to underestimate the extent to which aesthetic modernism does have substantial political and social effects. Mythology, language and being Schelling develops some of the STI’s ideas on art and mythology in the slightly later – 1802–3 – Philosophy of Art (PA), a text which is, however, much more obviously linked to Idealism than to Romanticism. The PA argues that something vital is lost when the modern world ceases to be able to

in Aesthetics and subjectivity
Alison Lewis

French naturalism, which was superseded by symbolism and a new ‘nervous romanticism’. In a recent revision of this idea, Stéphane Michaud has argued in favour of seeing classical works of German modernism by Musil and Döblin as the legitimate heirs to French naturalism.14 Alternatively, we could view expressionism, the successor to naturalism, as does Richard Heinrich, as a ‘naturalism of nerves’.15 Richard Daniel Lehan goes further, proposing that the literary modes of naturalism and realism were the crucial ‘vortex through which the novel passed’ across Europe and

in A history of the case study
Open Access (free)
Disability in working-class coalfields literature
Kirsti Bohata, Alexandra Jones, Mike Mantin, and Steven Thompson

research is once again absent here’. Looking North: Northern England and the National Imagination (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2004), p. 150. 8 For example, The Labour Publishing Co., The Forward Press, Independent Labour Party Publications, Lawrence and Wishart (initially associated with the Communist Party), Victor Gollancz and Michael Joseph Ltd. 9 See Michael J. Dixon, ‘The Epic Rhondda: Romanticism and Realism in the Rhondda Trilogy’, in Meic Stephens (ed.), Rhys Davies: Decoding the Hare (Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2001); Huw Osborne, Rhys

in Disability in industrial Britain
Open Access (free)
Melanie Giles

discussed in Chapter 6 . Even quite reasonable discussions of the violence and methods of death suffered by Lindow Man (such as Hill 2004b ) have earned the ire of sceptics, keen to demystify this phenomenon (Hutton 2004b ; see also response by Hill 2004a ). Meanwhile in 1960s Denmark, Glob’s emphasis upon ritual sacrifice to a goddess of fertility, in the cases of Tollund and Grauballe Man, have been critically situated by Asingh ( 2009 : 18) in a similar backlash: ‘In the post war years, National Romanticism was dusted off … Just think – we Danes are descendants of

in Bog bodies
Jes Wienberg

would undoubtedly be much poorer, and perhaps impossible. Back in the nineteenth century, as scientific disciplines emerged with their special genre of publications, seminars, and conferences, there was a parallel boom in historical narratives with an element of escapism. As part of the reaction of Romanticism to the Enlightenment project, the French Revolution, and the Napoleonic Wars, both science and art increased. Rational science was separated from speculative inquiry at the same time as there were constant crossings of borders. Artists have interpreted the

in Heritopia
Jes Wienberg

relativism. The debate may also arise on account of vandalisation of World Heritage sites (e.g. Silverman & Fairchild Ruggles 2007 ; Langfield et al . 2010 ; Logan 2012 ; Harrison 2013 : 140ff; Ekern et al . 2015 ; Bille Larsen 2018 ; Meskell 2018 : 218ff). The relationship between the outstanding and the universal in the case of World Heritage is part of a larger debate about the particular and the general. On one side is the universalism of the Age of Enlightenment, with humanity as an imagined collective, and on the other is the particularism of Romanticism

in Heritopia
Open Access (free)
Romances, novels, and the classifications of Irish Romantic fiction
Christina Morin

Stannard Barrett, The heroine, or adventures of a fair romance reader (Kansas City, MO: Valancourt Books, 2011), p. xix. 41 Jim Shanahan, ‘Escaping from Barrett's moon: recreating the Irish literary landscape in the Romantic period’, in Kelly (ed.), Ireland and Romanticism , p. 195. 42 William Hazlitt

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829