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Medicine, care and rehabilitation

Road to Wigan Pier, new edn (London: Penguin Classics, 2001), p. 13. 16 Ramsay Guthrie, Kitty Fagan: A Romance of Pit Life (London: Christian Commonwealth Publishing, 1900), p. 78. 17 J. C. Grant, The Back-to-Backs (London: Chatto and Windus, 1930), p. 18. 18 Harold Heslop, The Gate of a Strange Field (London: Brentano, 1929), p. 33. 19 Lewis Jones, We Live (1939) in Lewis Jones, Cwmardy and We Live (Cardigan: Parthian, 2006), p. 637. 20 Jones, Cwmardy and We Live, p. 169. 21 Tom Hanlin, Yesterday Will Return (London: Nicholas & Watson, 1946), p. 120. 22 Hanlin

in Disability in industrial Britain

-consul. This purports to be a statement by Haidar Khan and Amir Jang, ‘prince of the Bahktiari’, to the effect that the three travellers were the first outsiders to accompany the Bahktiari on their perilous migration through the Zardah Kuh pass. By this means, we are reminded that it is not, after all, the Bahktiari, but rather the travellers who, in the classic manner of the travelogue, are the real heroes of this film. Melodrama and the documentaire romancé : the case of In the Land of the Head Hunters

in Beyond observation
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Irish drama since 1990

preserves most of the elements of melodrama – suspense, sensational episodes and romance – though unambiguously happy endings are in short supply. In The Beauty Queen of Leenane (1996), The Cripple of Inishmaan (1996), A Skull in Connemara (1997), The Lonesome West (1997) and The Lieutenant of Inishmore (2001) these elements are liberally seasoned with satirical stereotypes of Irishness and stage Irishry. McDonagh’s work, despite being embedded in the traditional formulae of Irish drama, also bears a close affinity with British ‘in-yer-face drama’ of the 1990s, serving

in Irish literature since 1990
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An epilogue

subaltern and palpable difference. It follows that these representations do not announce the romance of resistant identities and the seductions of the autonomous subject, split apart from power. Rather, figures of critical difference and subaltern community appear here as inhabiting the interstices of power, intimating its terms and insinuating its limits – already inherent, always

in Subjects of modernity
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time and probably for the last time. [ 55 ] It’s quite difficult to imagine this version of my father – the drama, the romance, the fear of that time, and his participation in it all. Just as surprising for me was to come across a photograph of him with an unknown woman, taken in the earlier years, in which he looks so confident and debonair. One of my German American relatives had the picture – she doesn’t know who the woman was, or where it was taken. Of course I also didn’t know my father as a young man. He was nearly forty years old when I was born. hH

in Austerity baby
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Film festivals and the revival of Classic Hollywood

’ since The Exorcist has been widely available for years on video in a slightly different version. Against this, the titles exhibited as part of the Warner Brothers Shorts series wear their obscurity like a badge of honour: examples include Romance of Robert Burns (‘as it says (expect the worst), with Owen King, 1937’ [65]) and Hollywood Wonderland (‘Fritz Feld . . . as a Michael Curtiz

in Memory and popular film
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Baker and Berman, and Tempean Films

thriller, not so easy to hook them on a soft romantic plot.’ 11 It may be that in relation to romantic films, audiences expect major stars as a focus for their attention and empathy. For whatever reason, none of Tempean’s second features fall into this category. There is usually a romantic action proceeding in parallel with the thriller plot, as was the case with most crime films, but the romance was never the centre of

in British cinema of the 1950s
Separate Tables, separate entities?

and the Major, but for the film Burt Lancaster was John and David Niven took the part of Major Pollock. The film played up a hint of romance between the Major and Sybil Railton-Bell, suggesting at least a potential heterosexuality for the military man. Rattigan never wanted this, however, thinking it would be a ‘bowdlerisation of the original’. 9 So the studio covertly employed a second screenwriter

in British cinema of the 1950s

example, Gregory Blaxland, Golden Miller (London: Constable, 1972), p. xi. Noel Fairfax-Blakeborough (ed.), J. F.-B: the memoirs of Jack Fairfax-Blakeborough (London: J. A. Allen, 1978), p. 182. Sporting Life, 19.5.1924. Theodore Felstead, Racing romance (London: Werner Laurie, 1949), pp. 100–2. John Hislop, Far from a gentleman (London: Michael Joseph, 1960), p. 177. 1923 Select Committee, QQ7957–67 (Heathorn). W. Bebbington, Rogues go racing (London: Good and Betts, 1947), pp. 120–1 took the same view. 1923 Select Committee, Q2244 (Hamilton). 1923 Select Committee

in Horseracing and the British 1919–39

arising from the shared experience of racing and often shared backgrounds. Jockeys loved racing and horses, and the language of jockey autobiographies is very revealing here. Hislop, for example, talked about his horses as ‘noble’, ‘magnificent’, a ‘beautiful picture’, and found racing had ‘a freshness and interest’, an ‘exhilarating’ ‘new world’ of ‘romance and risk’. Rae Johnson, on his first ever visit to a racecourse, ‘got drunk … on the atmosphere’, enjoyed its ‘excitement’, ‘thrill’, ‘applause’ and ‘glamour’.11 One division was created by the highly efficient

in Horseracing and the British 1919–39