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Flying high?

Culture, criticism, theory since 1990

Scott Brewster

. This symbol-processing also harks back to the Industrial Development Authority’s ‘Young Europeans’ posters in the 1980s, which proclaimed the Republic as both a romantic rural paradise and a perfect site for multinational investment. Thus the advertising campaign could situate sharply suited executives against the backdrop of unspoilt landscapes, Newgrange and neo-Gothic castles. Luke Gibbons argues that this ‘neo-traditionalism’ with its ‘fabricated relationship to the past’ could happily co-exist with the new information technologies, since it manipulates the past

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Anu Koivunen, Katariina Kyrölä and Ingrid Ryberg

be used at all in some contexts. In Butler’s (2016:  25) words, undoing the binary between vulnerability and resistance is a feminist task, but ‘vulnerability cannot be the basis of group identification without strengthening paternalistic power’. She further critiques human rights discourse and legal regimes for ignoring ‘modes of political agency and resistance within so-​called vulnerable populations’, seeing them instead as in need of institutional or state protection and advocacy (Butler, 2016:  24–​5). On the other hand, feminist scholars such as Alyson Cole

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Martin D. Moore

’. During the mid-twentieth century, most doctors saw the quality of medicine as dependent upon the employment of sufficient numbers of trained and experienced professionals, often working together, with access to the latest diagnostic and therapeutic technologies. However, amid growing popular, political, and medical criticisms of clinical practice, academic doctors in particular began to reframe concepts of quality during the last decades of the twentieth century. Drawing on concepts and technologies developed in medical research and education, elite practitioners cast

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M. Anne Brown

by the state (or the majority) on the individual’s proper exercise of his or her freedoms and interests. Thus rights protect both the individual from incursions by the state and the individual’s interests in the context of the state. This way of conceptualising human rights has been fundamental to the evolution and the project of the modern free-market liberal democratic state. It has provided a remarkably powerful framework for the characterisation of both the individual and political community and for the identification of abuse. Moreover it has to a significant

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Ethnic identity, power, compromise, and territory

‘Locals’ and ‘Moroccans’ in the Sainte-Foy-Bordeaux vineyards

Chantal Crenn

organisation (e.g. power relations, leadership, ethnic trade, occupation of territory, collective happenings in public space) and its interpretation within individual trajectories. We will first present the historical and economic context of the vineyard around Sainte-Foy-la-Grande and the processes of distinctions; identifications that profoundly involve the situations of interethnic relations; and the definition, which those who consider themselves indigenous, give to Moroccans. We will then discuss the rural–urban continuum in which the vineyard and Moroccan families are

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Christopher Morgan

scientific register for poetry, his own increasing experimentation with that register, his subtle ambivalence with regard to applied technology, his ongoing critique of ‘the machine’, and his view of modern physics as a branch of pure science potentially reconstructive in its employment of imagination and intuition. Although the significance of these topics is generally recognised by critics, that significance has, as yet, received scant detailed attention. My treatment in this chapter is aimed to reveal an often-underestimated intellectual breadth and sophistication in

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Conclusion

Science and industrial development: lessons from Britain’s imperial past

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Sabine Clarke

wider commitment to funding scientific research in order to provide knowledge for colonial development after 1940. It is a commonplace claim in much scholarship on science and development to assert that the high profile given to scientists and technological solutions after 1945 resulted from an unquestioning faith in the superior nature of American and European science and technology, possibly fuelled by Allied success in the war and the emergence of technological wonder weapons such as penicillin, DDT and the atom bomb. In contrast to such claims, Britain

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David M. Turner and Daniel Blackie

followed with dissection, were of most value to the advancement of medical knowledge. In 1835 Simpson had been able to send part of the lungs of another miner, 62 DISABILITY IN THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION Robert Leishman, which exhibited black membrane, to the Museum of Guy’s Hospital in London as a significant medical specimen.37 Yet Thomson’s report also revealed the difficulties faced by medical men in obtaining specimens caused by the resistance of families of the deceased. Those who in their own estimation stood for medical progress in the identification of the

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Andrew Bowie

or Schoenberg – to being virtually the only source of non-deluded insight into a ‘reified’ reality. This, of course, makes the status of his own theoretical claims problematic: do the artworks need his philosophy, or is it vice versa? Now the difficulties in Adorno are of a quite specific nature, stemming from his totalising verdict on the effects of commodification on modern culture. This verdict leads to the idea of a world where repressive identification, the reduction of things to the ways they can be manipulated for human purposes that is most obviously present

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Mark Harvey, Andrew McMeekin and Alan Warde

homogeneous products at different prices to the market. Quality differentiation, including semiotic and presentational differentiation, however, immediately creates heterogeneity and monopoly market conditions, where informational comparability becomes problematical. This becomes even more so in normative technology approaches, where consumers are faced with a ‘make or buy’ decision for food services – cooking, presentation, delivery, and so on (Becker 1965; Stigler and Becker 1977). These approaches share the assumption that self-provisioning and commodity provisioning are