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Open Access (free)
Jonathan Atkin

’. However, he had concluded sadly, it had also been inevitable and hence resistance was useless. Bennett then developed what he described publicly as a ‘stolid attitude’ towards the conflict, regarding it as a last battle between the old concept of a noble war for territorial power and modern ideals of democratic and social change. Bennett’s biographer has remarked that he, ‘saw the true issue of war not as the struggle for territory but as the struggle for ideals – the ideas of democracy, social justice and peace’.25 He had no love for the German military caste or

in A war of individuals
Open Access (free)
Sibylle Lacan’s Un père: puzzle
Elizabeth Fallaize

wanted the two families present at the wedding. Sibylle subsequently holidayed with her father and Judith in St Tropez and in Italy, and became painfully aware of what Roudinesco calls Lacan’s ‘véritable adoration pour Judith. Il souffrait amèrement de n’avoir pu lui donner son nom et lui voua un amour exclusif et passionné’ (Roudinesco, p. ) (veritable adoration for Judith. He suffered bitterly from the knowledge that he could not give her his name and loved her with an exclusive passion). Judith later married one of Lacan’s most devoted disciples, Jacques

in Women’s writing in contemporary France
Open Access (free)
Christopher Morgan

lost sources. Poetry in this manner becomes both the product of search and the search itself. It becomes the breathing space, as the American poet Charles Olson would claim, the breath itself, the respiration of the poet.3 If Thomas’s poetry is an underwater archaeological excavation of the self, the unity he achieves over alienation, though repeatable, can only be temporary. The fragments of the divided self remain touchstones for each other but can enjoy no permanent reunion such as that anticipated in Derek Walcott’s ‘Love after Love’ from his 1976 collection Sea

in R. S. Thomas
Eric Pudney

sympathetic characters to appear. Part of what enables forgiveness to be extended to the witches in most Elizabethan plays is that they tend to be involved in comedies with strong romantic elements. A love comedy, by its generic nature, precludes the meting out of harsh punishments. Love magic is a phenomenon with obvious comic and dramatic potential, and one which tends to diminish the guilt of those carrying it out, since love leads to the matrimonial resolution demanded of early 1 Katherine M. Briggs, Pale Hecate’s Team (London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1962), p. 59

in Scepticism and belief in English witchcraft drama, 1538–1681
Steve Sohmer

heroine Leila is already disguised in boy’s clothing, has taken the name Fabio, and is employed as a page by her beloved Flamminio, who is lovesick for Isabella, who scorns him but lusts for Leila-Fabio. A similar love triangle appears in Twelfth Night with Viola-Cesario as the hypotenuse. The Italian play also includes wily servants, silly old men, and the timely return of

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Steve Sohmer

In 1991 another quasi-religious epiphany struck Inge Leimberg: ‘What Malvolio ought to have seen at a glance ... is his own image mirrored in a very simple anagram reflecting the creed of man fallen off from the love of God and thrown into the outer darkness of self-love: “ Eritis sicut deus ,” says the devil, and Adam homo promptly replies: I’M A & O!’ [Alpha and Omega

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Affiliation, allusion, allegory
Rachel E. Hile

of accounting for what David Lee Miller calls “the poem’s deliberate badness” (Miller, “Laughing,” 245), the many features—from drearily repetitive poetry in Alcyon’s too-long lament to the generic transgressions of a pastoral elegy in which the mourner refuses any possibility of consolation other than death—that have made the poem Spenser’s least-loved work. Historical approaches to the poem seek interpretive help from information derived from the historical context; formal approaches look at issues of genre and intertextuality, but no one can agree on what

in Spenserian satire
Steve Sohmer

? Weren’t his friendships as dear to him as Valentine’s, his loves as unquenchable as Helena’s, his losses as bitter as Hamlet’s? Though a multitude of commentators and biographers have judged Shakespeare an unusually secretive person, wouldn’t it be stranger still if events in his own life did not colour his works? Every fiction writer’s oeuvre

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Foregrounding the body and performance in plays by Gina Moxley, Emma Donoghue and Marina Carr
Mária Kurdi

marriage. Reciprocal love grows between her and an Irish girl, her new dresser called Annie Ryan, whom she rechristens as Ryanny, for whom Annie looks ‘more of a gentleman than any man I ever laid eyes on’ (p. 58). Ryanny’s insistence that they should get married and have a church wedding with the usual paraphernalia must be linked to her Catholic roots and conservative upbringing. Yet the act qualifies as highly subversive, violating both age-old law and custom while constituting an early example of same-sex marriage, a much questioned option and only recognised in a

in Irish literature since 1990
Open Access (free)
Irish poetry since 1990
Jerzy Jarniewicz and John McDonagh

’Siadhail’s work illustrates the nature of contemporary Irish poetry, particulary south of the border. Collections such as Hail Madam Jazz (1992), A Fragile City (1995) and Love Life (2005) showcase a poet at home in his own fragile sense of humanity, sensitively aware of the everyday concerns that consume so much time, and refreshingly free from any sense of an over-arching theme or agenda. His poetry is that of almost instant recognition, often unadorned, eschewing complex imagery yet crafted with a sharp eye on the unity of form and subject. Contemporary life in Ireland is

in Irish literature since 1990