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Thomas Robb

want to pursue such a course of action. One can infer that this was the belief of Ford also given that, if he did not agree with Scowcroft’s advice, he would have asked for a different memorandum for his discussion with Callaghan. Safety net Having been chancellor of the exchequer during the 1960s, Callaghan was well acquainted with the fluctuations in the rate of sterling. He therefore saw the current difficulties as an opportunity to not only overcome the short-term fluctuations in sterling, but also as a means for ensuring its longer-term stability. For the

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Jonathan Colman

and had to draw heavily on their line of short-term credits’. 1 In London, after deliberations, the Prime Minister, Burke Trend (Secretary to the Cabinet), and John Silkin (Chief Whip) concluded that they should seek American help to obviate the immediate prospect of devaluation, then negotiate with the Americans ‘to see’, according to Wilson, ‘whether they would take the whole burden of the sterling balance from our backs

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Doing the hokey-cokey

Everyday trajectories of activism

Hilary Pilkington

chapter opens with a broad-brush portrait of the socio-demographic profile of activists in this study contextualised in existing data on the composition of support for, and activism in, far right organisations. The chapter then considers routes into (and often out of) the movement and the costs and consequences of participation. While space does not allow the detailed profiling of all respondents, the individual stories of eight activists are included as short vignettes. In this way, it is hoped to evoke characters who are recognisable and ‘live from chapter to chapter

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Laura Stark

was intended to be intelligible to others in the community, means that it can illuminate the background knowledge regarding sorcery’s place in social life which is not always available from historical documentation. Although folklore often falls short of meeting the historian’s standards for precision in form and chronology, and often lacks support from other documentation, 8 these shortcomings become less relevant when

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Richard Suggett and Eryn White

profound change.17 In many lordships the custom of partible inheritance was recognized and land was inherited by and divided equally between male co-heirs. Inherited land could not be sold but a distinctive form of mortgage (prid) developed in medieval Wales that circumvented the obligation to retain lands within a kin group. Welsh mortgages were theoretically perpetually renewable. Land was transferred for a fixed term, usually four years, and at the end of the period the land was either redeemed or re-mortgaged for a further term.18 This system of permanently

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“That dangerous contention”

A cinematic response to pessimism

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Davide Panagia

short answer is ambiguous: yes and no. Indeed, I would argue that a first lesson that we learn from reading Cavell on film is the antinomian position (first elaborated by Immanuel Kant in the third Critique ) that there can be no rules for expressing or indexing or proving the existence of value. Thus, the best that we can do, to use Cavell’s famous term, is acknowledge it

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Managing the real

Reading SimCity

Barry Atkins

-infinite in the extent of their possible combinations. This text is so ‘scriptable’, to use Roland Barthes’ term, that it may appear as almost unreadable as text. ‘You’ watch ‘your’ city grow and change over time, zooming in and out of the screen to observe the daily lives of ‘your’ citizens in as much detail as ‘you’ want. ‘You’ can even switch off the menu bars and watch ‘your’ city ticking over without being reminded that ‘you’ can intervene. There are no fights to win, no exploration to undertake, no puzzles to solve. SimCity 3000 even disposes of those optional

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Land reforms and ethnic tensions

Scenarios in south east Europe

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Christian Giordano

Staatnation. This German term of French origin (Pierré-Caps 1995: 56) is based on the doctrine according to which each ‘nation’ must have its own territorial State and each State must consist of one ‘nation’ only (Altermatt 1996: 53). It is not surprising that the past century has been marked by repeated efforts to make individual national territories more and more ethnically and culturally homogeneous, especially in south east Europe where the principle of Staatnation was applied much later than in western Europe; that is, only after the downfall of the imperial multi

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Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, David Philips and Shurlee Swain

not, encompass the full range of Indigenous peoples’ responses to dealing with settler states. While we cannot address these issues here, we acknowledge their enduring salience. As Garth Nettheim has observed, particularly in relation to Canada and Australia: Indigenous peoples’ organizations today are claiming not just short-term special measures to allow them to

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Denis O’Hearn

. Many official economists were optimistic about the economy’s future, and assumed that the downturn was short term and that the economy would return to a moderate equilibrium growth path within a year or two.38 Regardless of the sustainability of even moderate growth in Ireland’s economic model, which is so dominated by and dependent on TNC activities, the experience of the Celtic Tiger presents us with an opportunity to assess whether such a neo-liberal economic model is desirable on social grounds. Such an assessment comes in two parts. First, there is the question