The status of bodies in the aftermath of the Khmer Rouge genocide
Anne Yvonne Guillou

fundamental to our understanding of post-genocide Cambodian society, and in particular rural Khmer society, which has been largely neglected since ethnological studies slowly started again in the 1990s. HRMV.indb 146 01/09/2014 17:28:41 The Khmer Rouge genocide  147 From the suffering body to scars on the landscape: an ethnography of the traces of the genocide When, in 2007, I began a programme of ethnographic research into the traces of the Khmer Rouge genocide in a village in western Cambodia, the ‘body’ that I imagined I would be studying would be of the sort

in Human remains and mass violence
Listening to the Campanaccio of San Mauro Forte
Nicola Scaldaferri

during Carnival, as is the case in a number of situations in Italy, Greece and Slovenia. While Carnivals have long been the subject of ethnographic inquiry with regard to their performative and symbolic aspects, only recently has the sonic dimension become the subject of scholarly attention. These studies have often revolved around the role of bells (Blau et al. 2010 ; Corbin 1998 ; Frank 2008 ; Harlov 2016 ; Panopoulos 2003 ; Price 1983 ). Particularly important was the publication of Steven Feld’s multisited ethnography of bells in the form of a series of CDs

in Sonic ethnography
Open Access (free)
Public anger in research (and social media)
Hannah Jones, Yasmin Gunaratnam, Gargi Bhattacharyya, William Davies, Sukhwant Dhaliwal, Emma Jackson, and Roiyah Saltus

wanted to ask whether, in sharing through this medium, possibilities were created for ‘anger expressed and translated into action’, as Audre Lorde might imagine. One method we tried out as part of our online ethnography was to organise Twitter debates using the project's @MICResearch Twitter account, asking our Twitter followers provocative questions which we hoped would open up debate. While there were a few interesting exchanges, overall there

in Go home?
Open Access (free)
Emotions and research
Hannah Jones, Yasmin Gunaratnam, Gargi Bhattacharyya, William Davies, Sukhwant Dhaliwal, Emma Jackson, and Roiyah Saltus

Research on Sensitive Topics , London : Sage . Riessman , C. ( 2005 ) ‘ Exporting ethics: A narrative about narrative research in South India ’, Health , 9 ( 4 ): 473–90 . Visweswaran , K. ( 1994 ) Fictions of Feminist Ethnography , Minneapolis, MN : University of Minnesota Press

in Go home?
Robbie Shilliam

, that is, in the spiritual hinterlands. Erna Brodber ( 1997 : 98) calls this mode of reclaiming – re-recognizing – your collective self as ‘the hegemony of the spirit’. And she terms the methodology for such retrieval as ‘celestial ethnography’ (Brodber 1997 : 61). A cartographic practice too, no doubt. Brodber expounds this methodology in the novel, Louisiana , which she

in Recognition and Global Politics
Open Access (free)
Birgit Lang, Joy Damousi, and Alison Lewis

such as ethnography, linguistics and anthropology. The case study of an endangered indigenous language in Australia and the case study of foreign language pedagogy in the university classroom are just two of the varied types of case studies that have become staple forms of academic writing today. In tertiary teaching, the case study method has retained importance in psychology and psychiatry, as in medicine. Other fields, such as law and commerce, have moved on from the more traditional approaches to teaching through cases; those approaches tended to use case studies

in A history of the case study
Open Access (free)
Recorded memories and diasporic identity in the archive of Giuseppe Chiaffitella
Nicola Scaldaferri

sound is separated from its original source, to ‘focus the listener on some intrinsic feature of the sound’ (Kane 2014 : 29). In this case, the sound itself, now separated from its source and confined to a new magnetic support, becomes more powerful and evocative, with an emotional charge which sometimes can be even stronger than its live performance. Listening to the tapes was the first stage of this research, which became an archival sonic ethnography that revealed the role of the recordings in sustaining a network of relationships. Dealing with these recordings

in Sonic ethnography
Open Access (free)
Thom Davies

. 2019. Conflictual collaboration: Citizen science and the governance of radio­ active contamination after the Fukushima nuclear disaster. American Ethnologist, 46(2), 214–226. ethnography: An introduction. Cultural Shapiro, N. and Kirksey, E. 2017. Chemo-­ Anthropology, 32(4), 481–493. Strasser, B. J., Baudry, J., Mahr, D., Sanchez, G., and Tancoigne, E. 2019. “Citizen science”? Rethinking science and public participation. Science & Technology Studies, 32(2), 52–76. The Economist 2017. The world’s most valuable resource is no longer oil, but data. The  Economist

in Toxic truths
Wordlists, songs, and knowledge production on the colonial Australian frontier
Anna Johnston

precedent and authority – was only partial. This was, in some significant and painful ways, salvage ethnography: data collected from individuals who were literally remnant populations, violently dispossessed of their lands and often, through massacre, disconnected from long-standing traditions of knowledge transmission based upon age, gender, and cultural authority. 61 Yet it also provides evidence of the deliberate and forward-thinking adaptations made by Indigenous individuals and communities to colonial modernity as it arrived in their country. Barlow was in no

in Worlding the south
Rumours of bones and the remembrance of an exterminated people in Newfoundland - the emotive immateriality of human remains
John Harries

. 69–​84, 80–​2. 12 See M. Bille, F. Hastrup and T. F. Sørensen (eds), An Anthropology of Absence (London:  Springer, 2010); M. Meyer, ‘Placing and tra­ cing absence: a material culture of the immaterial’, Journal of Material Culture, 17:1 (2012), 103–​10. 13 Meyer, ‘Placing and tracing absence’, 105. 14 M. Meyer and K. Woodthorpe, ‘The material presence of absence: a dialogue between museums and cemeteries’, Sociological Research Online, 13:5 (2008), quoted in Meyer, ‘Placing and tracing absence’, 104. 15 I. Marshall, History and Ethnography of the Beothuk

in Human remains in society