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Postcolonial women writers in a transnational frame

Literature: A Critical Introduction (London and New York: Routledge, 1993). See Inderpal Grewal, Home and Harem: Nation, Gender, Empire and the Cultures of Travel (London: Leicester University Press, 1996). Avtar Brah, Cartographies of Diaspora: Contesting Identities (London: Routledge, 1996), p. 16. Paul Gilroy, The Black Atlantic: Modernity and Double Consciousness (London: Verso, 1993). See also Kadiatu Kanneh’s critical account of Gilroy in her African Identities: Race, Nation and Culture in Ethnography, Pan-Africanism and Black Literatures (London and New York

in Stories of women
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diaspora groups. The examination of diaspora space, that is, lateral and horizontal interrelationships within diasporas is necessary to move beyond “racism” in our historical and ethnographic theorisations of diaspora among black and Caribbean diasporas. As Thomas and Clarke ( 2006 , p. 14) note: “[O]‌ther circulations [are] equally critical in the unveiling of counter histories and the constitution of

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
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What does race have to do with the Yugoslav region?

‘research on global hip hop has forced me to crystallize my thinking on race’ (Helbig 2014 : 5). Helbig's Hip Hop Ukraine is based on ethnographic research with black Africans (often students, in Ukraine via routes established during the Cold War) and white Ukrainians in local hip-hop scenes or working elsewhere in Ukrainian popular music. It connects postcolonial Soviet studies with global translations of ‘race’ through the transnational routes of popular entertainment. These translations of ‘race’ include: legacies of state socialist ideologies about music, blackness

in Race and the Yugoslav region

’. This chapter follows such leads in moving away from a conflict or ethniccentred analysis of neighbourhood relations. It is based on comparative ethnographic research carried out between 2006 and 2007 in two contiguous neighbourhoods, Grbavica (Sarajevo) and Lukavica (Eastern Sarajevo), which were part of the same city (Sarajevo) and municipality (Novo Sarajevo). With the outbreak of war in 1992, they fell under Serb military control but in 1996, immediately after the Dayton Peace Agreement, Grbavica was reintegrated into the predominantly Muslim-inhabited part of

in Migrating borders and moving times
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Tracing relatedness and diversity in the Albanian–Montenegrin borderland

; Morrison 2009). In the second sense, I conceptualise the ethnographic reality of genealogy, which people were reconstructing and literally carrying around, as a narrative (and) agency space.7 In other words, I appropriate the local prominence of the genealogical mode of representation and relatedness as a ‘sensor’ for inquiring into modes of accommodating various dimensions of social differentiation as well as the dynamics of life in a border region. Genealogy figures here as a ‘boundary marker’ (Heiss and Slama 2010), exemplifying specific modes of exclusion and

in Migrating borders and moving times
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Borders, ticking clocks and timelessness among temporary labour migrants in Israel

paths: immigration, gender, and political participation’, International Migration Review, 32(2): 326–349. Kasinitz, Philip, John H. Mollenkopf and Mary C. Waters (eds) (2004) Becoming New Yorkers: Ethnographies of the New Second Generation. New York: Russell Sage Foundation. Kemp, Adriana (2007) ‘Managing migration, reprioritizing national citizenship: undocumented migrant workers’ children and policy reforms in Israel’, Theoretical Inquiries in Law, 8(2): 663–692. King, Russell, Mark Thomson, Tony Fielding and Tony Warnes (2006) ‘Time, generations and gender in

in Migrating borders and moving times
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very clear. Therefore, it seems important to explore the understanding that economic agents have of their own practice. For instance, it would be interesting to explore the perceptions, understanding and practical operations of key and powerful actors in industry and government regarding the nature and limits of competitive processes in different national and sectoral contexts. In this regard, wider use of qualitative, even ethnographic, methods of investigation might elucidate a range of views prevailing at any one time and their change over time. We have already

in Market relations and the competitive process
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Mapping times

irretrievable process of producing an OSM map with a group of other volunteer mappers. As a self-described ‘intervention’, these narratives unfold, deconstruct and liquidise traditional spatial metaphors through a series of animated interjections – Gerlach offers an auto-ethnographic exploration of mapping focusing on the banality of logistics Introduction: mapping times 15 and equipment, while reflecting on the ideological and discursive nature of digital cartography. Together, these threads playfully ‘undo’ traditional conceptualisations of how mapping and cartographic

in Time for mapping

  time 30 Ephemerality/mobility reflecting upon the somatic, affective and micropolitical energies of mapping. Methodologically, this is something of a ‘fieldwork of fieldwork’ insofar as a central activity of OpenStreetMap is one of ‘surveying the field’; a mode of cartographic interpolation. As such, this modest tracing of a day’s cartography joins a growing number of studies that approach examples of vernacular mapping in an ethnographic manner (see Perkins and Dodge, 2008); a realisation of human geographers’ tentative re-acquaintance with all things cartographic

in Time for mapping
Exploring the real-time smart city dashboard

conducting ethnographic observations of actual processes of mapping and decision-making in smart city control rooms. Acknowledgements An early version of this work was presented during the workshop ‘Time travelers: Temporality and mapping’, University of Oxford, 27–28 May 2014. The author wishes to thank the participants for their comments and suggestions. Notes  1 Their plea for slowness ties in with a recent call by Christoph Lindner for the slow smart city (Lindner, 2013). In Italy, città slow are positively conceptualised as prioritising quality of life over

in Time for mapping