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Jonathan Atkin

of Social Reconstruction, and its genesis occurred very shortly after the start of the war, a period of loneliness for Russell and, as he remarked to his friend Lucy Donnelly, moral upheaval. He commented to her in August 1914 that, ‘Events of a month ago seem to belong to a previous experience. All our hopes and faiths and foolish confidences are gone flaming down into hell … Hardly anyone seems to remember common humanity’.18 The terror of this spurred Russell to action. At the time he was writing to Lucy Donnelly, he was also outlining to Lady Ottoline Morrell

in A war of individuals
Open Access (free)
Jonathan Atkin

struck home. In particular, the months immediately before his enlistment had been filled with literary promise combined with great personal freedom while writing and walking in the Devon countryside. The conflict made him feel isolated in his literary aspirations and appreciation of beauty from ‘the great herd of men’ as he described the war-mad world to H.D. (echoing Galsworthy’s perception). The isolation of the training camp, situated on a coast that he described with a poet’s eye as a ‘grey, sickly peevish line’ reinforced Aldington’s own singularity, and he wasted

in A war of individuals
Open Access (free)
Jonathan Atkin

unshaved, slogging along, silent and tired … God, what is heroism: It baffles me.’11 Macnaughton was particularly affected by Furnes, thinking it a tragic place filled with ghosts which seemed to stifle her thoughts to such an extent that she found writing in her notebook an impossibility and was forced to return to the hospital, ‘where at least I was with human beings and not ghosts’. At La Panne in February 1915 she remarked on the ‘peculiar brutality’ that existed and animated everything within sound of the constant guns. ‘Nothing seems to correspond’, she wrote in

in A war of individuals
Colonialism, Jewishness and politics in Bacon’s New Atlantis
Claire Jowitt

’s Civitas Solis (1625).9 All of these imagined societies were organised around particular structuring Price_07_Ch7 131 14/10/02, 9:45 am 132 Francis Bacon’s New Atlantis principles – religion, state control, or science. The parallels between More’s text and the New Atlantis are particularly striking since both take the discovery of America as the imaginative opening from which to generate a fantasy society.10 For Thomas More, writing at the beginning of the sixteenth century, the recognition of America as a New World rather than part of the Old World, the Indies

in Francis Bacon’s New Atlantis
Open Access (free)
White fragility and black social death
Ylva Habel

wrote that ‘academic hags’ and ‘quasi-​academics’ like me should stop writing debate articles to fish for research funding. He furthermore mentioned his genitals, as if that had something to do with the matter. In his view I, even though I was not named in his text, ‘invented’ racism in order to criticise it. At this early stage, several white debaters critiqued Thente for the baseness of his attack and questioned whether it could be fruitful to carry on a discussion at ‘penis-​level’ (Krutmeijer, 2012). Others critiqued Thente’s name-​calling, while also pointing to

in The power of vulnerability
Sustaining literature
Claire Colebrook

sustain a living form requires resisting, however minimally, absolute biodegradability. One might say that to be is to pollute or to make a mark on one’s milieu (Serres 2010). A certain model of nature – a being that might live without creating a mark, scar, loss or point of inertia and immobility – is analogous to a certain model of writing and meaning. Just as it is possible to imagine an eternal and pure nature, sustaining itself through time and enduring beyond human finitude, one might also imagine a writing so lucid, true and coherent that its initial textual form

in Literature and sustainability
Gender, sexual difference and knowledge in Bacon’s New Atlantis
Kate Aughterson

travellers first reach the island events are recounted through the eyes of the narrator in a straightforward and lucid style, which nevertheless belies the strange contents. The events and people described are inversions of both European habits and of travellers’ tales of the new world, intermixed with the standard motifs of early travel writing. Utopian otherness is not portrayed simply as an inverted world: it combines inversions of generic conventions (of travel writing, scientific discovery, and political philosophy) with conventions signifying in an expected way. This

in Francis Bacon’s New Atlantis
Open Access (free)
Don’t Ever Wipe Tears Without Gloves as a reparative fantasy
Anu Koivunen

someone having been there  –​and someone bearing witness –​testifying in the present moment. Second, while not autobiographical, Don’t Ever Wipe Tears Without Gloves reiterates many familiar themes of Gardell’s writing and stage performances since the late 1980s: growing up as a queer child in a religious home, being harassed at school, bearing social stigma, and experiencing and living with the threat of violence. These topics as well as the use of the autobiographical self are the very core of Gardell’s oeuvre. Third, in interviews on Don’t Ever Wipe Tears Without

in The power of vulnerability
Political and contemporary contexts of the Shows
Tracey Hill

prosperity, a work which is quite a bit shorter than many of its predecessors, perhaps a reflection of uncertain times. Middleton strikes a dark note in the first speech, doubtless alluding to the dual misfortunes of 1625, plague and the death of a monarch, writing that ‘a cloude of griefe hath showrde upon the face / Of this sad City, and vsurpt the place/ Of Ioy and Cheerfulnesse’ (sig. A4r). Middleton uses the image of a rainbow to suggest a silver lining to these recent clouds in the person of the new Lord Mayor and the Political and contemporary contexts 277 chance

in Pageantry and power
Open Access (free)
Representations of Irish political leaders in the ‘Haughey’ plays of Carr, Barry and Breen
Anthony Roche

when defending his writing of Hinterland: ‘these people [politicians] are part of us . . . It is not possible to step away from them now that they are disgraced. Even as a principle of self-preservation, we should realise we’re shooting off a part of our own body. The thing has to be healed rather than cut off.’4 By the late 1990s the unprecedented national confidence which accompanied the financial buoyancy of the Celtic Tiger prompted a greater degree of soul-searching. In deciding to establish the Tribunals, Taoiseach Bertie Ahern stated that their purpose was ‘to

in Irish literature since 1990