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The intellectual influence of non-medical research on policy and practice in the Colonial Medical Service in Tanganyika and Uganda
Shane Doyle

World Health Organization , 12, 3, 1955 , pp. 471–5; Ainsworth, Infancy in Uganda , p. 1. Cf. J. Bowlby, Maternal Care and Mental Health , Geneva, 2nd edn., World Health Organization, Monograph Series, No. 2, 1952 . Ainsworth observed that weaning was not always as abrupt as it was reputed to be. 58 M. Geber, ‘The Psycho-Motor Development

in Beyond the state
Crucial collaboration, hidden conflicts
Markku Hokkanen

civilisation, education and Christianity was dangerous for African mental health, thereby inferring (among other things) that is was better that the African insane were removed from missionary influences. 23 Government medical services expanded considerably during the interwar years. In 1921, the government medical staff treated 19,000 African cases; and by 1937, 729,000 cases were treated, with medical

in Beyond the state
Open Access (free)
The narrative
Sara De Vido

the following rights as being infringed by VAW: the right to life; the right not to be subject to torture or to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment; the right to equal protection according to humanitarian norms in time of international or internal armed conflict; the right to liberty and security of person; the right to equal protection under the law; the right to equality in the family; the right to the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health; the right to just and favourable conditions of work.27 Other rights can be considered

in Violence against women’s health in international law
Open Access (free)
Dalia Abdelhady, Nina Gren, and Martin Joormann

governmentality and its reliance on disciplinary power. According to Foucault (1979), disciplinary power is that which is exercised through administrative systems and social services, such as prisons, schools, and mental health services. As disciplinary institutions, they rely on mechanisms such as surveillance, assessment, the organisation of space, timetables, and daily routines, which ensure that people behave in certain ways or are being disciplined without having to resort to the use of corporal violence. Disciplinary mechanisms ensure the control of populations and

in Refugees and the violence of welfare bureaucracies in Northern Europe
Hans Peter Broedel

an unholy bargain with the devil, but they had been tricked into doing so, and were, in TMM5 8/30/03 110 5:40 PM Page 110 THE MALLEUS MALEFICARUM any case, less than fully culpable by reason of their age, poverty, gross ignorance, and failing mental health. Despite their differences, Alphonso de Spina and Nicholas of Cusa both accepted an essentially conservative and traditional view of witchcraft, in which the experiences of women who followed the bonae res were basically imaginary. For others, this kind of faith in ecclesiastical tradition seemed no longer

in The <i>Malleus Maleficarum</i> and the construction of witchcraft
Open Access (free)
Reconceptualising states’ obligations in countering VAWH
Sara De Vido

, sexual violence and/or incest,134 and in cases of severe malformation of the foetus and risks to the life or health (including mental health) of the pregnant woman. States could still retain room to manoeuvre, the ‘margin of appreciation’ in the jurisprudence of the ECtHR, in deciding to what extent abortion can be limited, provided that, as I argue in this book, denial of abortion does not cause VAWH, in terms of intense suffering, and what the HRC has called a ‘high level of mental anguish,’ connected to an ‘intense stigma and loss of dignity’ for the pregnant woman

in Violence against women’s health in international law
Communism, post-Communism, and the war in Croatia
David Bruce MacDonald

See -Dord-e Obradović, Suffering of Dubrovnik (Dubrovnik: Dubrovački Vjesnik, 1993). 113 Eduard Klain, ‘Yugoslavia as a Group’, Croatian Medical Journal, 33 (1992) (War Supplement 1) pp. 3–14. I first found this article discussed in Predrag Kaličanin, Stresses of War (Belgrade: Institute for Mental Health, 1993), and later verified the quotations for myself against the original. 114 Ibid. p. 9. 115 M. Jakovljević, ‘Psychiatric Perspectives of the War against Croatia ’, Croatian Medical Journal, 33 (1992) (War Supplement 2), pp. 10–18. As with Klain’s article, I

in Balkan holocausts?
Open Access (free)
Art and interpretation
Andrew Bowie

theory”’ (Brandom 2000 p. 179). The point is that the 192 Aesthetics and subjectivity same person could use two such vocabularies, for example as a neurologist working on the brain chemistry of trauma, and as a parent concerned about the mental health of their child resulting from the child’s traumatic experiences which could be helped by the right kind of therapy. One of the more puzzling aspects of contemporary debates about language and truth is that positions which acknowledge that the myth of the given is indeed a myth seem to end up with wholly divergent ideas

in Aesthetics and subjectivity
Robert Mackay

mental health in the Blitz was the complete refutation of pre-war expert opinion; by any measure the people were as healthy in mind as before the bombing, if not more so. As a response to air raids, ‘trekking’ occurred almost everywhere, especially when it seemed to people that their city was in for a series of attacks. Clearly, some people felt too afraid to pass the nights in their homes and were not convinced of the power of the authorities to protect them from the danger, even when the provision of shelters was adequate. It was the provincial counterpart of the

in Half the battle
David Bruce MacDonald

Impossible Country: A Journey Through the Last Days of Yugoslavia (Boston: David Godine Publishers, 1994) p. 19. 112 Pavličević, ‘Persecution and Liquidation of Croats on Croatian Territory From 1903 To 1941’. 113 Ibid. 114 Reprinted from Globus in Predrag Kaličanin, Stresses of War (Belgrade: Institute for Mental Health, 1993) p. 2. 115 Slavenka Drakulič, Cafe Europa: Life After Communism (London: Abacus, 1996) pp. 12–13. 131

in Balkan holocausts?