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A sociology of the amateur
Geneviève Teil and Antoine Hennion

its tradition, the existence of a specific and elaborated vocabulary, the size and variety of the available ‘library’ dealing with its various aspects (guides, books, critiques, secondary literature, amateurs’ chronicles, novels, etc.), the formalisation of training or education and, more broadly, the level of social recognition, valorisation and institutionalisation. chap 1 13/8/04 26 4:12 pm Page 26 Qualities of food A matter of method: beyond external accounts or arbitrary outside references Amateurs are our informants Based on a method we had already used

in Qualities of food
Open Access (free)
Quality and processes of qualification
Mark Harvey, Andrew McMeekin, and Alan Warde

a lens through which one can estimate inequalities of power as one traces the procedures through which relations between actors are channelled. The exploration of the adding of value along the chain is a similar means of inference in understanding the relative power of actors in the market stages of the food system. In addition, many of the grounds for recognising some foods as of high quality are precisely a consequence of their formal recognition and regulation, through systems like Appelation Contrôllé, DOC, not to mention claims made by marketing organisations

in Qualities of food
A critical assessment of work effort in Britain in comparison to Europe
Alan Felstead and Francis Green

self-interested recognition that healthy employees are good for business performance. Working longer and harder? Britain in European comparison 205 Notes 1 While our preference is to report UK results, this is not always possible, with many surveys excluding Northern Ireland. Hence, some of the results apply to Britain and the UK; this is reflected in the text. 2 These figures are derived from a Nexis database search: https://nexis.com/. All English-language news sources were searched using the keywords ‘Britain’ or ‘UK’ and the phrase ‘longest hours in Europe

in Making work more equal
Open Access (free)
Diversification and the rise of fragmented time systems
Iain Campbell

the start, signalling recognition of employees as individual human beings with lives outside of the workplace. They represent a crucial step away from the highly commodified forms of work such as casual work or ‘day labour’, characteristic of the late nineteenth century, where employees were simply suppliers of labour-time in return for hourly or daily wages and were dependent on employers on a recurrent dayto-day basis for offers of work and pay (Bosch, 2006: 44–5). A broad understanding of the regulatory system of standardised working  hours allows us to see how

in Making work more equal
Mick Marchington and Tony Dundon

chapter is part of a celebration and recognition of the academic career of Professor Jill Rubery. Many of her contributions – often in conjunction with other long-standing Manchester researchers such as Goodman, Marchington and Grimshaw – have instigated and extended key debates about labour market regulations and institutions that shape voice and other aspects of employment relations. Ackers (2010) analyses the way in which these research trajectories shaped numerous investigations into labour markets over the last 30 years. Rubery, in different ways, discredited the

in Making work more equal
Gill Haddow

) alongside the preservation of ‘human dignity’ (Degrazia, 2007 ). The report suggests that xenotransplantation practices call into question where the boundaries are between what is human and what is a non-human animal. The discourse of the value of the shared physiological features between human and non-human animals, is challenged by an awareness of the rights of non-human animals based upon a recognition that they share emotional and cognate abilities similar to human beings. This is partly why the term ‘non-human animals’ is used by animal activists and academics in

in Embodiment and everyday cyborgs
Open Access (free)
The autonomous life?
Nazima Kadir

habitus undermines the convincing performance of the autonomous, defiant activist, such as in the case of people addicted to alcohol or drugs, who lack capacity to manage both movement and mainstream tasks, or simply originate from working-class backgrounds. Both performance and habitus require recognition, and therefore, an audience. In addition to analyzing both successful and failed performances and the various types of habitus possessed by people in this community, I also consider how others recognize these

in The autonomous life?
Nazima Kadir

towards collective goals and a purely defensive enjoyment of the security offered by the group is nebulous. Today’s social movements contain marginal countercultures and small sects whose goal is the development of the expressive solidarity of the group, but there is also a deeper commitment to the recognition that personal needs are the path to changing the world and to seeking meaningful alternatives. (Melucci 1989 : 49) In connection to this point about

in The autonomous life?
Open Access (free)
Rodney Barker

try to see what sort of a bird we are looking at, or even if it is a bird at all rather than some other creature entirely. Nor is the nature and function of plumage limited to making recognition possible. Plumage is just as necessary to the bird as it is to those who want to identify it. Without its feathers, the bird can neither fly nor swim, attract mates nor hide from predators. The feathers are neither additions to the bird nor expressions of the bird, they are part of what the bird is, as any bird spotter would have told Paine. But Paine was drawing on an

in Cultivating political and public identity
Open Access (free)
Nazima Kadir

communicate one’s history and status. Hence, class and social position are reproduced through subtle, unconscious recognitions of affinity that are demonstrated through habitus and taste. This understanding of habitus is essential to how Bourdieu distinguishes between various forms of “capital,” looking beyond monetary wealth to larger cultural and social articulations of class and social position. He classifies economic capital as one’s amount of financial wealth. Cultural capital refers to the amount of cultural and

in The autonomous life?