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human need’ (Taylor 1994 : 26) because it is closely intertwined with questions of identity and our sense of place in the world. If our understanding of who we are doesn't resonate with the wider society, whose members refuse to recognize us, we are likely to suffer from a lack of self-confidence and a sense of powerlessness. Certain forms of non-recognition or misrecognition are

in Recognition and Global Politics
Open Access (free)
The discovery, commemoration and reinterment of eleven Alsatian victims of Nazi terror, 1947– 52

   Human remains in society were young Alsace-​Lorrainers who had died as forced recruits in the Wehrmacht and SS.4 Alsace was a key geographic centrepiece in the Franco-​German rivalry that spanned the late nineteenth and first half of the twentieth centuries. In 1871, 1914 and 1940–​44 France and Germany turned the province into a battlefield in a literal military sense during times of war and an ideological battleground of competing national narratives during times of peace. The results of the three different conflicts saw Alsace change sovereignty four times between

in Human remains in society
The Marshall Plan films about Greece

Greek orphans, victims of the vicious Civil War. In an ironic and rhetorically self-conscious mode, the film’s narrative appears to turn against its own discourse and to question the relevance of the ancient Greek classical heritage with a shot of a boy labouring as a shoe polisher with the Parthenon in the background (see figure 2.1 ). This shot is the ‘climax’ of a sequence, introduced with discomforting questions that

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
Open Access (free)

study can be defined as one of modernity’s vital narrative forms and means of explanation. A History of the Case Study builds on our earlier edited collection, Case Studies and the Dissemination of Knowledge, and outlines how case knowledge actively contributed to the construction of the sexed subject.2 The present volume tells the story of the medical case study genre in a historically and geo­ graphic­ally contingent manner, with a focus on Central Europe, extended also to the USA. The lives of individual brokers of case knowledge are pivotal to this book, as is the

in A history of the case study
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less staging posts for institutional and historical assessment, than driving forces for more self-​conscious storytelling. Melodramatic devices in turn contributed to a shift in the way that female roles contributed to the narratives, resulting in a much richer examination of gender than in the early films. In Any Given Sunday (1999), Christina Pagniacci (Cameron Diaz) assumes a strong role that is not in any way propped up Lo v e by her sexuality. She is playfully undaunted by the sight of naked football players in the changing rooms, while asserting her own

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
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Fetters of an American farmgirl

Harding (1998) Life in the Iron Mills, Boston, Bedford Books [1861]. Doriani, Beth MacClay (1991) ‘Black Womanhood in Nineteenth Century America: Subversion and Self-Destruction in Two Women’s Autobiographies’, American Quarterly, 43:2, 199–221. Douglass, Frederick (1982) Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Harmondsworth, Penguin [1845]. Duck, Stephen (1989) ‘The Thresher’s Labour’, in ‘The Thresher’s Labour’ by Stephen Duck and ‘The Woman’s Labour’ by Mary Collier: Two Eighteenth Century Poems, London, The Merlin Press [1730]. Dunne, Robert

in Special relationships
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Evil, Genocide and the Limits of Recognition

understanding the worst of human wrongdoing might be based. In this chapter, I explore the possibility of formulating linkages between recognition and the problem of political evil by paying particular attention to the world, rather than the self or the other. The main point of departure for this project revolves around distinguishing between evil and non-evil harms, given a shift in emphasis from

in Recognition and Global Politics
Open Access (free)
The predicament of history

decolonisation; and the historical imagination itself. On race and ethnicity I’ll say only a little. There is no doubt that of those non-white West Indians we discuss, born before the cataclysm of the 1930s, the majority strove hard in their personal lives to rise above race. In this, the political ultras, James and Padmore, were little different from self-styled moderates, such as Moody. (McKay, as so often

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
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Another time

past, present, and future and bestow it with their own rhythms and schedules. Morano’s and Gallan’s life stories present us with a way in which hegemonic social time can be destabilized and re-figured. Moreover, I suggest that their life-stories narrative subsumes a sense of controlling time, demonstrating their own life markers and temporal agency. Researching the web, one can find alternatives to the temporal regimes so rare within the conventional global romantic and familial cultural scripts. However, when one makes the effort to tap into different search

in A table for one
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presentation of the war’s most vulnerable victims to promote the United Nations’ internationalist ethos and associated humanitarian campaigns. In chapter 2 , ‘Classical Antiquity as Humanitarian Narrative: The Marshall Plan Films about Greece’, Katerina Loukopoulou contributes an in-depth analysis of the relationship between global humanitarianism and non-fiction cinema by examining the rhetorical representation of ancient history and national heritage in

in Global humanitarianism and media culture