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The oddity of democracy
Rodney Barker

. 8 David Owen, ‘Self-Government and “Democracy as Reflexive Co-operation”: Reflections on Honneth's Social and Political Ideal’, in van den Brink and Owen, Recognition and Power , p. 294. 9 John S. Dryzek, Deliberative Democracy and Beyond: Liberals, Critics, Contestations (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000), pp. 113

in Cultivating political and public identity
Jeremy C.A. Smith

histories and modernities –​which pointed to the complexity and depth of connectivity in the modern global order –​by asserting that a map of inter-​civilisational encounters can help differentiate specific scenarios in the global age. That this is a helpful step is not in doubt, but it does not give recognition to the depths of connections. For the present author, it suggests that connectivities are obligatory subject matter for civilisational analysis. Arnason’s account of the West’s prominence in modernity can serve to illustrate my point.To begin with, credit is given

in Debating civilisations
Jeremy C.A. Smith

do not receive the recognition in the field that they should, with a few exceptions. Subrahmanyam is suspicious of the proposition that civilisations are long-​term formations, and he responds with emphasis on connected regions and regional contexts. When it comes to comparative sociology’s neo-​Weberian meta-​ theoretical framework, Subrahmanyam is clearly distant. He spurns Weber’s ‘cultural explanation’ because of its Eurocentrism and it finds no favour with him due to the privilege it accords to Western Europe (1997: 760). This may be the reason for the limited

in Debating civilisations