Open Access (free)
Geoffrey Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde and John Lydgate’s Troy Book
Heather Blatt

important ways. They also affect the reception of medieval texts. Scholars now recognize that such contributions – emendations, modified prefaces, added passages – create texts worth study, not texts viewed as ravaged by the errant interventions of wayward readers. Beyond the reconsideration of the value of reader emendation stands the participatory reader, whose figure gave focus to writers’ expectations about their audiences. References to reader participation, rare in Middle English or Anglo-Norman works before the late fourteenth century, flourish in the fifteenth

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England
Open Access (free)
Susan M. Johns

), 336. 7 F. Pollock and F. W. Maitland, A History of English Law before the Time of Edward I (Cambridge, 1895, 2nd edn 1898, repr. London: Cambridge University Press, 1968), 1. 484–5. 8 Postles, ‘Choosing a witness’, p. 335. 9 J. Hudson, ‘Anglo-Norman land law and the origins of property’, in G. S. Garnett and J. G. H. Hudson (eds), Law and Government in Medieval England and Normandy: Essays in Honour of Sir James Holt (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994), pp. 198–222, at p. 210. 98 witnessing 10 J. G. H. Hudson, Land, Law and Lordship in Anglo-Norman

in Noblewomen, aristocracy and power in the twelfth-century Anglo-Norman realm
Suzanne Conklin Akbari

the significance of the combination and interrelation of texts in the manuscript.9 Since the Siege of Melayne survives in this single witness, and is not alluded to or cited elsewhere,10 the poem itself is almost impossible to date. A lost Anglo-Norman original was posited by the text’s first editor, Sidney Herrtage, at the suggestion of Gaston Paris. Though subsequent editors have repeated this assertion, no evidence of such an original has appeared. Herrtage dated the poem to the late fourteenth century, presumably on the basis of its relationship to the group of

in Pulp fictions of medieval England
Le Bone Florence of Rome and bourgeois self-making
Felicity Riddy

concerns the adventures of Florence, daughter of the emperor of Rome, between the time when she is first sought in marriage and the time at which she conceives her first child. ‘Make us chaste and honourable’, is the daughter’s prayer in MUP_McDonald_10_Chap9 201 11/18/03, 17:06 202 Felicity Riddy the Bolton Hours, and the story of Florence can be read as a fantasy of that process of making. II Le Bone Florence of Rome is a much shortened version of an early thirteenth-century French poem, Florence de Rome, which circulated in England in the Anglo-Norman period: two

in Pulp fictions of medieval England
Richard Suggett and Eryn White

communities, especially in the south, which had originated in the period of Anglo-Norman settlement. Pembrokeshire was particularly diverse with clearly defined Englishries and Welshries as well as the remnants of Flemish communities, and a continually replenished Irish population who tended to adopt English rather than Welsh as their language. But, unquestionably, Welsh was the dominant language within Wales and the only language spoken by the majority of its inhabitants whose speakers were increasing numerically throughout the late medieval and early modern periods and

in The spoken word
Open Access (free)
Susan M. Johns

, quam erga mei petiisti, locutus sum cum uxore mea et cum baronibus, et inveni in meo consilio quod concedam eam Deo. She also gained spiritual benefits, since Earl Hugh stipulated that he should be treated as a brother of the house, and that he, his wife and his parents should be entered into the abbey’s book of commemorations. Chester Charters, no. 28. M. Clanchy, From Memory to Written Record: England, 1066–1307 (2nd edn, Oxford: Blackwell, 1993), p. 156; J. G. H. Hudson, Land, Law and Lordship in Anglo-Norman England (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1994), p. 163. EYC. 2

in Noblewomen, aristocracy and power in the twelfth-century Anglo-Norman realm
James Paz

-​century Durham. For it was in Durham that the community of Cuthbert would finally cease their wanderings and establish a new home. And it was in Durham, in 1104, as the new Anglo-​Norman cathedral was being built, that the monks would open the coffin up once more, inspect the body of St Cuthbert, and find it to be incorrupt, looking as if asleep, giving off sweet smells, the bones solid, the flesh soft, the limbs still bendy. On the one hand, the tangible realness 171 Assembling and reshaping Christianity 171 of the body allowed those monks to reach backwards through time

in Nonhuman voices in Anglo-Saxon literature and material culture
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Adam Fox and Daniel Woolf

south gait of Edinbrugh’ in 1508. Among the Arthurian tradition which was also finding its way from script to print, the shepherds knew ‘The tail of Syr Euan, Arthours knycht’, ‘Arthour knycht he raid on nycht’, and ‘Arthour of litil bertangye’. Some of the great stories of Anglo-Norman romance literature, such as ‘The tayl of the four sonnis of Aymon’, ‘Claryades and Maliades’ and ‘Beuis of Southamptoun’ were equally said to be at their fingertips, perhaps derived from their earliest printed forms.92 Among the songs which the shepherds sang were those which were

in The spoken word
Sukanta Chaudhuri

Pastoral Poetry of the English Renaissance contains the text of the poems with brief headnotes giving date, source and other basic information, and footnotes with full annotation.

in Pastoral poetry of the English Renaissance