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Open Access (free)
Melissa Dickson, Emilie Taylor-Brown, and Sally Shuttleworth

widespread anxiety about the vitality of the British Empire and concerns about imperial over-reaching, as well as fears of the revolt of an apparently unruly, ungovernable, and newly enfranchised urban population. The metaphoric associations of the cancerous growth resonated in many colonial contexts, as doctors who reflected on medicine in non-European contexts became particularly engaged with the conceptualisation of certain races as more or less prone to the disease, and therefore as more or less ‘modern’. Commentators on the domestic ‘cancer epidemic’ perceived its

in Progress and pathology
Open Access (free)
The ‘pathology’ of childhood in late nineteenth-century London
Steven Taylor

Catherine W.'s ‘home is quite unfit for an invalid’ and she only ever was seen ‘wearing one dirty garment’ were not uncommon. 28 The institutional concerns about these girls were directly related to broader ideas about what it meant to be ‘modern’: in the near future there was a strong possibility that they would be responsible for their own households and their progeny would be the men and women that the British Empire relied on as industrial workers and members of the armed forces. Childhood and the

in Progress and pathology
Christine E. Hallett

Luard – a woman with a strong and resolute character – as the victim of propaganda; and yet, like other members of her class, she was steeped in the values of her time – values that emphasised valour, self-sacrifice, and service to the British Empire.21 In 1915, when the First World War was still in its early stages, Luard published her first memoir. Her book was compiled from a series of ‘journal’ entries written for her family, and mailed home to Birch Rectory. Luard had been an avid letter-writer since first leaving home, addressing her frequent letters sometimes

in Nurse Writers of the Great War
Emergency nursing in the Indian Mutiny
Sam Goodman

; it begins by briefly considering the culture of textual production that surrounds both the period in question and also Anglo-Indian society of nineteenth-century Britain, outlining the significance of the diary format itself to female authors and medical practitioners in colonial India and the wider British Empire at this time. The chapter then considers specific printed accounts of female participants from the Siege of Lucknow, particularly those of Colina 19 Sam Goodman Brydon, Emily Polehampton, Georgina Harris and Lady Julia Inglis, analysing how these women

in Colonial caring
So what went wrong?
Odette Best

years, the reality for Aboriginal Australians was very different. Massacres were rife throughout the country with little, if any, retribution against the offenders. Warne estimates that, at a conservative estimate, 10,000 Aboriginal people died violently in Queensland during this time.21 Land owners who were expanding the British Empire through agriculture and cattle development believed that the land was theirs for the taking. They paid little or no regard to Aboriginal clans and nations who had lived on the land for more than 40,000 years.22 There are many

in Colonial caring
Barbra Mann Wall

Rafferty detail the establishment of the Colonial Nursing Association that began in 1896 to recruit British nurses for work across the British Empire.11 Both colonial nurses and missionaries established nursing education projects in Nigeria, each based on the European model that centred on hospital training. Nigerian students worked under the guidance of white European nurses. The British erected the first government hospital in Calabar in the southeast, and by 1914, twenty-six medical facilities and one leprosy asylum were in existence.12 It must be noted here that

in Colonial caring
Open Access (free)
Balance, malleability and anthropology: historical contexts
Chris Millard

. 70 Fitzgerald and Callard, ‘Social science and neuroscience’, p. 16. 71 E. Linstrum, Ruling Minds: Psychology and the British Empire (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2016). 72 C. Millard, ‘Using personal experience in the academic medical

in Balancing the self
Open Access (free)
Gareth Millward

these programmes. The medical civil service headed by the Ministry and the Scottish Office began to centralise immunisation policy further than it had done in previous decades. They did so within a global network of knowledge, coloured by the decline of the British Empire and the United Kingdom's new role in the international community. Britain's national interests therefore extended beyond the immediate medical and public health debates. Through a series of examples, this chapter explores how concerns over the nation were expressed. First, two outbreaks in England

in Vaccinating Britain
Open Access (free)
Christine E. Hallett

, Death of a Hero (London:  Hogarth, 1984 [1929]); Graves, Goodbye to All That; Sassoon, Memoirs of a Fox-Hunting Man. 47 Vera Brittain, Testament of Experience: An Autobiographical Story of the Years 1925–1950 (London: Fontana, 1980 [1957]): 77. See also: Christine E. Hallett, Veiled Warriors:  Allied Nurses of the First World War (Oxford:  Oxford University Press, 2014): 1–4. 48 Mary Britnieva, One Woman’s Story (London: Arthur Baker, 1934). 49 Michelle Smith, ‘Adventurous Girls of the British Empire:  The Pre-War Novels of Bessie Marchant’, The Lion and the Unicorn

in Nurse Writers of the Great War
Bonnie Evans

everyday life and expression. A growing generation of grammar-school-educated critical thinkers was finally able to challenge the authority of traditional models of social progress and evolutionary development espoused by authorities such as Cyril Burt. On the international stage, the British Empire was in its death throes. Harold Macmillan’s ‘Winds of Change’ speech to the

in The metamorphosis of autism