Open Access (free)
Nicholas Atkin

preserve their preferred anonymity. The diversity of the French communities raises a further observation: few of these men and women had chosen to be in Britain. These were not ‘resisters of the first hour’, who had rallied to the appel of 18 June, undertaking a hazardous exit from France by travelling across the Pyrenees to Spain or taking their chance on foreign-registered steamers to Glasgow or Liverpool. Refugees were in Britain by happenstance, driven across the Channel along with retreating British and French troops at Dunkirk. Most other refugees who had

in The forgotten French
Jane Brooks

-­ward dressing round its ritual. Nurses needed to develop more reactive nursing skills rapidly. Morris’s experiences as a student following the evacuation of soldiers from Dunkirk were to provide excellent training for her overseas postings: As I entered the Casualty department, I was astounded to see so many wet, dirty and injured people there. Some were soldiers (I guessed they must be Dunkirk survivors), others were civilians … they were all laid out on stretchers on the floor, and most of our surgeons and physicians were there, assisted by several senior Sisters and Staff

in Negotiating nursing
Open Access (free)
Refugees
Nicholas Atkin

2499 Chap2 7/4/03 2:42 pm Page 30 2 The misfortune of exile: refugees The Frenchman cannot forgive the English, in the first place, for not speaking French, in the second, for not understanding him when he calls Charing Cross Sharon-Kro or Leicester Square Lessetair Square. (Alexander Herzen, My Past and Thoughts)1 On 1 June 1940, as the first Allied troops trickled back from Dunkirk, George Orwell toured the London railway stations of Waterloo and Victoria in search of news of a family friend, the eminent surgeon Laurence O’Shaughnessy, who was attached

in The forgotten French
Open Access (free)
Nursing work and nurses’ space in the Second World War: a gendered construction
Jane Brooks

Slater did her tropical diseases training in order to go on active service overseas, but again the war ended and, she said, ‘life just took a different course’.72 Many research participants were able to remember vividly certain aspects of wartime nursing, especially caring for soldiers in the aftermath of the evacuation from Dunkirk in the late spring of 1940 and the Normandy landings four years later. These memories are framed within what Lynn Abrams refers to as episodic ­memories – ­that is, those memories that enable the participant to recall not only an event but

in Negotiating nursing
Robert Mackay

equally anxious conclusion.p65 249 16/09/02, 09:28 250 EXPLANATIONS to demonstrate their civic and patriotic virtue. To presume, therefore, that any behaviour that deviated from the stereotype of ‘the spirit of Dunkirk’ is evidence of the absolute emptiness of that stereotype would be as absurd as an insistence on its absolute veracity. And more seriously, it would be a libel on the majority – the great mass of ordinary people whose attitude and behaviour was more consistent with that phrase than not. A more reasonable presumption to make would be that among a

in Half the battle
Christine E. Hallett

entertaining in the capital.34 When Britain entered the First World War in August 1914, Borden was pregnant with her third daughter, Mary. She volunteered her 53 Independent ladies services to the London Committee of the French Red Cross, and, soon after Mary’s birth, travelled to Malo-les-Bains near Dunkirk to nurse typhoid patients. Her first posting was to a makeshift hospital in a converted casino and she was appalled by its lack of equipment and trained staff. She herself had undergone no formal nurse training at all and was obliged to learn from better experienced

in Nurse Writers of the Great War
Open Access (free)
Communities, circumstances and choices
Nicholas Atkin

the evacuation from the beaches of Dunkirk, accompanied by bedraggled elements of the French army. As the soldiers retreated, the politicians also departed. On 10 June, the same day as an opportunist Mussolini entered the war against France, Reynaud’s government left Paris for Bordeaux. Holding a series of makeshift meetings along the châteaux of the Loire valley, on 11–13 June, the French Cabinet discussed whether to leave and fight on from North Africa or to sue for an armistice, an option favoured by General Weygand, Gamelin’s recent replacement as commander

in The forgotten French
The Vichy consulates
Nicholas Atkin

and a reminder of his own parlous position. That few volunteers, whether expatriates or the marooned sailors of 2499 Chap4 7/4/03 2:44 pm Page 143 The Vichy consulates 143 Narvik and Dunkirk, enlisted in the Free French was frequently blamed on these consuls, notably those at London, Liverpool and Newcastle, who were believed to be illegally assisting refugees and service personnel with repatriation. With hindsight, it is easy to scoff at such paranoia, but it was perfectly understandable, given the general’s precarious footing, and was to some extent

in The forgotten French
Open Access (free)
La colonie Française
Nicholas Atkin

Charity. In June 1940, these men and women were joined by several of their co-religionaries. It will be recalled that, among the refugee population, there came some fifty priests and novices, together with nuns displaced from the coastal towns of Dunkirk and Calais. It was further recognised that many of the servicemen trapped in England were extremely devout. This was especially true of the officer class. It was noted that officers held in Blackpool, deliberately segregated from their men, were ‘intensely Catholic’, and believed Pétain was the only means of restoring

in The forgotten French
A queer history
Peter Buchanan

: I stood on the battlements and looked across the deep green meadows towards the place where perhaps the destiny of Saxon England was really decided. Dunkirk was fresh in our minds, but who remembers the Great March when the housecarles tramped three hundred miles in thirty days, along the rough track of a road, without transport and with little organized supply in the way of food? … How long ago it seems, the fight on the hill; yet I drove through Battle once again this past April, and it was as if it had been yesterday. History did not repeat itself in 1940, but

in Dating Beowulf