Open Access (free)
Mark B. Brown

political action in the public’s deficit of scientific knowledge. By making climate change into a personal matter for both himself and the audience, Gore recognised that knowledge alone is not enough. In this respect, they note, the Expertise 173 film echoes John Dewey’s argument that science education requires aesthetic modes of communication, because ‘ideas are effective not as bare ideas but as they have imaginative content and emotional appeal’ (Dewey, 1988:169). By presenting himself performing his slideshow in front of various audiences, Gore sought to ‘create a

in Science and the politics of openness
Stephen Turner

demands of the day. But the crisis in question was framed in moral terms. The Moral Rearmament movement, which had an international reach and agenda, was launched in 1938 in response to the spiritual crisis of the time, and explicitly conceived in response to Nazism. The arrival of the war focused the discussion of the moral crisis. One theme was the question of what the war was being fought for: Robert Maynard Hutchins and John Dewey debated the question in the pages of Fortune . 15 The famous London discussion group

in Post-everything
Open Access (free)
Monstrous markets – neo-liberalism, populism and the demise of the public university
John Holmwood and Jan Balon

universities will be perceived as aligned with a global elite and that this might cost them their funding. However, part of the problem is that universities have put their cultural and educative mission at risk precisely because of their concern with funding, while ignoring how the conditions of that funding have been tied to a change in their mission. In this afterword, we will draw on the work of John Dewey, especially his The Public and Its Problems (1927), to suggest that populism is a problem of ‘publics’ and the institutions in the public sphere that support them. In

in Science and the politics of openness
A naturalistic approach
Gilberto Corbellini and Elisabetta Sirgiovanni

are characteristics long observed by scientists, philosophers and sociologists during the period in which science was a model of knowledge. In addition, according to thinkers who are politically very different from one another – such as John Dewey, Michael Polanyi, Joseph Needham and Karl Popper – science and democracy share epistemological and ethical–political aspects. In particular, science and democracy both require tolerance, scepticism, rejection of authority, respect for facts, freedom of communication and free access to results. More specifically, the

in The freedom of scientific research
Open Access (free)
Lessons for future posts
Adriaan van Veldhuizen

concepts as well, see, for instance, Larry A. Hickman, Pragmatism as Post-Postmodernism: Lessons from John Dewey . (Ashland, OH: Fordham University, 2007); Jennifer M. Lehmann, Deconstructing Durkheim: A Post-Post-Structuralist Critique (London and New York: Routledge, 1993); Paul Jay, ‘The Post-Post Colonial Condition: Globalization and Historical Allegory in Mohsin Hamid’s “Moth Smoke”’, ariel , 36:1–2 (2005), 51–71. 22 Ulrich Beck, Risk Society: Towards a New Modernity (London

in Post-everything
The origins and endurance of club regulation
Duncan Wilson

, especially Hume’s work on sympathy, influenced codes of medical ethics circa 1800.102 During the early twentieth 38 The making of British bioethics century, however, philosophers abandoned work on ethics and refused to state how things ought to be. This shift involved a rejection of the previous belief that notions such as ‘good’ or ‘right’ could be objectively determined, which John Dewey had encapsulated when he defined ethics as ‘the science that deals with conduct, in so far as this is concerned as right or wrong, good or bad’.103 In his 1903 book Principia Ethica

in The making of British bioethics
Duncan Wilson

. 10. Emphasis in original. 107 Ibid, p. 33. 108 Ibid, p. 26. 109 Ibid, p. 28. 110 Joseph Fletcher, Situation Ethics: The New Morality (London: SCM Press, 1966) p. 29. 111 Ibid, p. 37. 112 Ibid, p. 30. 113 Ibid, p. 33. 114 Ibid, p. 39. 115 Jonsen, The Birth of Bioethics, p.  42. Fletcher also acknowledged his debt to the work of theologians such as Paul Lehmann and the pragmatist philosophy of John Dewey, who argued that the morality of a specific issue hinged on the circumstances in which it arose, Ian Ramsey and ‘trans-disciplinary’ medical

in The making of British bioethics
Films of the Sensory Ethnography Lab
Paul Henley

SEL film-makers have also been influenced by certain philosophical ideas, which are signalled by a number of key terms that crop up regularly in their writings and interviews. Particularly important are the allusions to ‘aesthetics’, as in the mission statement on the SEL website cited above. This is a reference, not to anything exclusively to do with fine arts, as one might think, but rather to the use of this term by the American pragmatist philosopher John Dewey to refer to any form of experiential engagement with the world that effects a transition from a state

in Beyond observation
Alexis Heraclides and Ada Dialla

Nation and editor-in-chief of the New York Evening Post ), Carnegie and the major labour union leader Samuel Gompers (President of the American Federation of Labor). Included were top intellectuals, such as philosophers William James, John Dewey and Felix Adler, sociologist William Graham Sumner, medieval scholar Charles Eliot Norton, social reformer David Starr Jordan and the foremost writers of the day, including Mark Twain (see his essay ‘To the Person Sitting in

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century