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Theoretical debates and the critical erasure of Beckett’s cinema
Matthijs Engelberts

’s project,8 before adding that ‘So far, only the Beckett section is completed’.9 In the world of cinema, then, Film is referred to primarily as the work of its scriptwriter: the man with a pen. While this manner of presenting the short film would change somewhat following its release, it would continue to diverge from 164 Beckett and nothing normal practice. The section in Cahiers du Cinéma on the 1965 Venice festival presents a number of films, but Schneider’s is the only one to receive a subtitle featuring two names instead of one: ‘Film de Samuel Beckett et Alan

in Beckett and nothing
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Beckett and anxiety
Russell Smith

11 It’s nothing: Beckett and anxiety Russell Smith On 11 August 1936, Samuel Beckett wrote the following passage – in German – in his notebook: How translucent this mechanism seems to me now, the principle of which is: better to be afraid of something than of nothing. In the first case only a part, in the second the whole is threatened, not to mention the monstrous quality which inseparably belongs to the incomprehensible, one could even say the boundless. [. . .] When such an anxiety [Angst] begins to grow a reason [Grund] must quickly be found, as no one has

in Beckett and nothing
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Shane Weller

once impossible and unavoidable. The consummation of this art comes, however, almost forty years later, in the unprecedented deployment of the unwords ‘void’ and ‘naught’ in Worstward Ho, where the aporias of both the ontological and the ethical nothing are enacted in a literary language that remains unlike any other: ‘Nohow over words again say what then when not preying. Each better worse for naught. No stilling preying. The shades. The dim. The void. All always faintly preying. Worse for naught. Worser for naught.’ Notes 1 Samuel Beckett, Disjecta: Miscellaneous

in Beckett and nothing
Ghosts and the busy nothing in Footfalls
Stephen Thomson

to philosophy it is emphatically not because he deals in clean, hard concepts shorn of the contingencies of bodily existence; for neither, in truth, does philosophy. 80 Beckett and nothing Notes 1 Samuel Beckett, Disjecta: Miscellaneous Writings and a Dramatic Fragment (London: John Calder, 1983). One might doubt how seriously this scribble to a pen pal, dismissed by Beckett himself as ‘German bilge’ (Disjecta, p. 170), should be taken. Yet the insistently negative moment of Beckett’s oeuvre, which can moreover be seen repeated en petit in the genesis of any

in Beckett and nothing
Beckett and the matter of language
Laura Salisbury

12 ‘Something or nothing’: Beckett and the matter of language Laura Salisbury In 1981, Lawrence Shainberg sent Samuel Beckett a copy of his book about neurosurgery hoping it might be of interest. To Shainberg’s surprise, Beckett replied almost straight away, and in their subsequent meetings, the younger author continued to be intrigued by Beckett’s enthusiastic and particularised questions about the work of the brain surgeon: Whenever I saw him, he questioned me about neurosurgery, asking, for example, exactly how close I had stood to the brain while observing

in Beckett and nothing
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Mladen Dolar

du Perron’ and ‘Fallor ergo sum’. Samuel Beckett, Collected Poems in English and French (New York: Grove Press, 1977). 2 It reduces it also in the opposite direction of the horoscope, since the last two lines of the poem point to the moment of death: ‘and grant me my second / starless inscrutable hour’. 3 James Knowlson, Damned to Fame: The Life of Samuel Beckett (London: Bloomsbury, 1996), p. 352. 4 Lawrence Graver and Raymond Federman, Samuel Beckett: The Critical Heritage (London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1979), p. 148. 5 Samuel Beckett, Disjecta: Miscellaneous

in Beckett and nothing
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Beckett’s television plays and the idea of broadcasting
Jonathan Bignell

action’ Screen, 18:2 (1977), 7–59. 3 Graley Herren, Samuel Beckett’s Plays on Film and Television (New York and Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007). 4 Henri Bergson, Matter and Memory, trans. N. Paul and W. Palmer (New York: Macmillan, 1912). 5 Herren, Samuel Beckett’s Plays, p. 13. 6 Jeffrey Sconce, Haunted Media: Electronic Presence from Telegraphy to Television (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2000). 7 Ibid., p. 126. 8 Ibid. 9 See Graley Herren, ‘Splitting images: Samuel Beckett’s Nacht und Träume’, Modern Drama, 43 (2000), 182–91; and Graley Herren, ‘Nacht

in Beckett and nothing
Nicholas Johnson

Although nearly every known text composed by Samuel Beckett has made at least one journey between media – plays becoming films, novels becoming performances, and manuscripts becoming XML – few texts have crossed between so many media as Play (1963). In its first decade of life, the play was performed in theatres (in three languages), published in periodicals and books (in three languages), and adapted – with significant revisions – for both cinema (Marin Karmitz, 1966) and radio (BBC Third Programme, 1966). Beckett approved non

in Beckett and media
Towards a digital Complete Works Edition
Dirk Van Hulle

. Nixon , Mark ( 2014 ), ‘ Beckett's Unpublished Canon ’, in S. E. Gontarski (ed.), The Edinburgh Companion to Samuel Beckett and the Arts, Edinburgh : Edinburgh University Press , pp. 282–305 . Pierazzo , Elena ( 2015 ), Digital Scholarly Editing: Theories, Models and Methods , Farnham, Surrey : Ashgate . Pierazzo , Elena and

in Beckett and media
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Balazs Rapcsak and Mark Nixon

Given the never-ending debates about the definition of the concept in media studies, it may seem peculiar that in Beckett studies the term ‘media’ has acquired a relatively stable meaning. When Linda Ben-Zvi published her insightful essay ‘Samuel Beckett's Media Plays’ in 1985 , it consolidated an understanding of the term that has dominated discussions ever since. On the one hand, this understanding promises to be abundantly clear: ‘plays written for a medium other than the stage: seven for radio, five for television, and one for film’ (22

in Beckett and media