Open Access (free)
Sarah Hale, Will Leggett, and Luke Martell

Part I The Third Way

in The Third Way and beyond
Sylvie Germain and the generic problems of the Christian novel
Margaret-Anne Hutton

 -  ‘Il n’y a pas de troisième voie’ (There is no third way): Sylvie Germain and the generic problems of the Christian novel Sylvie Germain (–) is an unusual phenomenon on the French literary scene. Having studied philosophy at the Sorbonne, she entered the audiovisual section of the Ministère de la culture in , securing immediate literary success four years later with her first novel, Le Livre des nuits ().1 Establishment recognition was soon to be consolidated by the award of the prix Fémina for her third novel, Jours de colère

in Women’s writing in contemporary France
Social welfare for the twenty-first century

Social democracy has made a political comeback in recent years, especially under the influence of the ‘Third Way’. Not everyone is convinced, however, that ‘Third Way’ social democracy is the best means of reviving the Left's project. This book considers this dissent and offers an alternative approach. Bringing together a range of social and political theories, it engages with some contemporary debates regarding the present direction and future of the Left. Drawing upon egalitarian, feminist and environmental ideas, the book proposes that the social democratic tradition can be renewed but only if the dominance of conservative ideas is challenged more effectively. It explores a number of issues with this aim in mind, including justice, the state, democracy, new technologies, future generations and the advances in genetics.

Open Access (free)
Luke Martell

In the late 1990s Third Way governments were in power across Europe – and beyond, in the USA and Brazil, for instance. The Third Way experiment was one that attracted attention worldwide, and gurus of the Third Way could count on invitations to conferences and gatherings of the politically interested across the world. Yet only a few years later

in The Third Way and beyond
The Third Way and the case of the Private Finance Initiative
Eric Shaw

Introduction There is a multitude of ways of defining and explicating the Third Way, and there is now an extensive literature on the matter. (See, in particular, chapters 1 and 8 in this volume.) I use the term ‘Third Way’ in a limited and, hopefully, precise manner. Policy-making is a complex and problematical matter, often entailing

in The Third Way and beyond
Sarah Hale

beliefs’. 4 The development and academic study of the ‘Third Way’ since the mid-1990s represents the most consistent and durable attempt to develop those overt beliefs on behalf of the ‘Centre-Left’ in general and New Labour in particular. The wording of McWalter’s question made explicit the idea that a politician’s guiding idea is expected to be a political

in The Third Way and beyond
Paul Cammack

the effort to re-align and redefine key social values in such a way that they confirm rather than challenge the logic of capitalism. Anthony Giddens’s The Third Way (published in 1998, and followed two years later by The Third Way and its Critics ) was advertised and widely understood as presenting a new politics of the ‘Centre-Left’, adapted to the

in The Third Way and beyond
Towards a third way and back?
Hartwig Pautz

7 The modernisation of German social democracy: towards a third way and back? Hartwig Pautz The German Social Democratic Party (SPD) has undergone a number of revisions since its birth in the nineteenth century. This chapter will explore the latest debate about what the SPD stands for. As a programme party, the debate about long-term objectives, values and ideological principles has been of particular importance to party members, its leaders and the public. Hence the focus of this chapter: it will document and analyse the programmatic discourse of the SPD

in In search of social democracy
Open Access (free)
Welfare reform and the ‘Third Way’ politics of New Labour and the New Democrats
Stephen Driver

, Labour’s welfare-to-work programme has been the centrepiece of this welfare reform drive – and of Labour’s attempt to mark out a new ‘Third Way’ for the Centre-Left. But some (for example, Cammack, in chapter 8 of this book) see New Labour’s US-influenced welfare reforms as marking a consensus, not a break with the New Right. This chapter examines whether a policy strategy based

in The Third Way and beyond
Open Access (free)
John Callaghan, Nina Fishman, Ben Jackson, and Martin Mcivor

irrelevant by changing economic circumstances, new electoral preferences and the ideological dominance of the New Right. This provides a suitably gloomy note on which to make the transition to Part II, ‘Responses to the crisis: the Third Way and other revisions’. Having set the stage in Part I with an analysis of the constraints operating on social democratic parties from the 1970s onwards, Part II moves on to examine detailed case studies of how particular social democratic parties responded in government to this changed political terrain. Five crucial national cases are

in In search of social democracy