James Downs

inside an audience studded with celebrities and aristocracy watched the film, offering rapturous applause for individual scenes. Afterwards, Walbrook took the stage along with Wilcox and Neagle, using microphones to address the audience. The enthusiasm at the premiere was echoed by both critics and the general cinema-going public. Aided by an energetic publicity campaign that saw Wilcox and Neagle travel

in The British monarchy on screen
An allegory of imperial rapport
Deirdre Gilfedder

-Australian relations, and British viewers who fantasise about Australian class iconoclasm. Yet, for obvious budgetary reasons, the film was primarily aimed at North Americans, not necessarily versed in this specific postcolonial issue, yet sensitive to its tension. Distributed by the Weinstein Company, it met with unexpected and sustained success in the USA, largely as a result of its inclusion of an older cinema-going

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
Yale’s Chronicles of America
Roberta E. Pearson

fraction of the cinema-going audience and already subject to powerful mechanisms of assimilation, perfectly filled the role of the non-white other whose negative representation conferred whiteness upon the majority of the series’ viewers. The remainder of this chapter looks in more detail at the Chronicles ’ representation of Native Americans, briefly delineating the contemporary political situation that

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
New retro movies in 1990s Hollywood cinema
Philip Drake

Erik Bauer, ‘The Mouth and The Method’, Sight and Sound , 8: 3 (1998), 7. 30 Willis, ‘The Father’s Watch the Boy’s Room’, 67. 31 Peter Krämer, ‘A Powerful Cinema-going Force? Hollywood and Female Audiences since the 1960

in Memory and popular film
Mike Huggins

cinema of reassurance (London: Routledge, 1997), pp. 1–2. See also Marcia Landy, British genres: cinema and society 1930–1960 (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1991) and Jeffrey Richards (ed.), The unknown 1930s: an alternative history of the British cinema 1929–1939 (London: B. Tauris, 1998). Ross McKibbin, Classes and cultures: England 1918–1951 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998), p. 456. John Sedgwick, ‘Cinema-going preferences in Britain in the 1930s’, in Richards (ed.), Unknown 1930s. Dennis Gifford, The British film catalogue, 1875–1970: a guide to

in Horseracing and the British 1919–39
Open Access (free)
The racecourse and racecourse life
Mike Huggins

could afford to go racing more regularly, so further meetings would not have generated sufficient profit. While cinema-going became a weekly event, going to the races was still a special occasion. In part this was because of the higher costs of admission, although not all courses were fully enclosed. Free areas could still be found at a few long-established high-status flat courses like Epsom or Newmarket in 1939. At Epsom too there was always Derby Sunday, when London working people, dressed up in their best clothes, took a day out to picnic on the Downs and join in

in Horseracing and the British 1919–39
Open Access (free)
Robert Mackay

Figures, p. 236. M-O, File Report 1151, March 1942. The Spectator, 2 April 1943. M-O, File Report 2085, April 1944. The Spectator, 2 February 1944. In the case of cinema-going, however, people were reluctant to concede defeat: Mass-Observation found that it was the last pursuit to be relinquished. File 486, 8 November 1940. The Spectator, 18 October 1940. Z. Katin, ‘Clippie’: the Autobiography of a War Time Conductress (John Gifford, 1944). M-O, File Reports 914 (trains), 1040 (buses). Longmate, How We Lived Then, pp. 293–320. Personal communication with the author

in Half the battle