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Open Access (free)
Feminism, anti-colonialism and a forgotten fight for freedom
Alison Donnell

colonialism had set in motion was now being replayed in a climate of highly-charged political restlessness and mobility that was to change profoundly the national identities and cultures of both Britain and its West Indian colonies. In her later years Marson continued to travel, spending 1952 to 1960 in the US. By the time she returned to London in 1964 she was able to appreciate that a very different cultural and

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Open Access (free)
Crossing the seas
Bill Schwarz

were required in order to think through the destruction of the old colonial order? From long before the arrival of Windrush in 1948, West Indian emigrants came from societies well advanced in the prerequisites of breaking from colonialism. They arrived with long memories, recalling events which, in the collective imagination of the British, had slipped into forgetfulness. 6 The typewritten novels and

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Barbra Mann Wall

associates spoke English.6 Thus in 1905 Irish mission work in Nigeria grew 189 Barbra Mann Wall when Irish-born Bishop Joseph Shanahan took over leadership of the Holy Ghost mission in Calabar (the eastern region).7 Soon, Irish missionaries dominated in the area. Because colonial powers’ religion was Christianity, this granted the Irish missions a distinct advantage, and they benefited from British colonialism.8 Catholic mission personnel co-operated with colonial leaders who wanted the Catholics to run hospitals and schools, while Catholic missionaries wanted access to

in Colonial caring
John Marriott

of countless women. 28 Campaign activists or those who provided its moral and economic rationale anticipated abolition would promote material and moral progress. In the event, the legacy of slavery and abolition was rather more ambiguous and uncertain. 29 Colonialism and progress In the first half of the eighteenth century Britain emerged as a mercantile, imperial and naval

in The other empire
Open Access (free)
Visions of history, visions of Britain
Stephen Howe

James’s most important direct influence in Britain, then, is surely not to be found in any of these milieux, but rather in his involvement in anticolonialist politics, and his impact on circles of Caribbean and African émigrés, students and activists who were usually temporary residents in the imperial metropole between the 1930s and the 1960s. These activities, and James’s ideas about colonialism and

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Sunil S. Amrith

assistance to the people in time of famine, and to devote all its available resources to this end’ (Government of India 1880: 31–2). The state committed itself, at least nominally, to preventing death from starvation. This commitment was open, thereafter, to expansion and interpretation. Thus if the institutional legacy of colonialism was to constrain the public health apparatus of India, the ideological legacy was the rise, perhaps unintended, of the notion that the state would and could intervene to prevent certain kinds of suffering.4 The ambivalent nature of the

in History, historians and development policy
John Marriott

/Cultural Dialogues. ‘Discoveries’ of India in the Language of Colonialism , London, Routledge, 1996, p. 20. 75 Ram Chandra Prasad, Early English Travellers in India. A Study in the Travel Literature of the Elizabethan and Jacobean Periods with Particular Reference to India , Delhi, Motilal

in The other empire
Editor: Bill Schwarz

Caribbean migration to Britain brought many new things—new music, new foods, new styles. It brought new ways of thinking too. This book explores the intellectual ideas that the West Indians brought with them to Britain. It shows that, for more than a century, West Indians living in Britain developed a dazzling intellectual critique of the codes of Imperial Britain. Chapters discuss the influence of, amongst others, C. L. R. James, Una Marson, George Lamming, Jean Rhys, Claude McKay and V. S. Naipaul. The contributors draw from many different disciplines to bring alive the thought and personalities of the figures they discuss, providing a picture of intellectual developments in Britain from which we can still learn much. The introduction argues that the recovery of this Caribbean past, on the home territory of Britain itself, reveals much about the prospects of multiracial Britain.

By expanding the geographical scope of the history of violence and war, this volume challenges both Western and state-centric narratives of the decline of violence and its relationship to modernity. It highlights instead similarities across early modernity in terms of representations, legitimations, applications of, and motivations for violence. It seeks to integrate methodologies of the study of violence into the history of war, thereby extending the historical significance of both fields of research. Thirteen case studies outline the myriad ways in which large-scale violence was understood and used by states and non-state actors throughout the early modern period across Africa, Asia, the Americas, the Atlantic, and Europe, demonstrating that it was far more complex than would be suggested by simple narratives of conquest and resistance. Moreover, key features of imperial violence apply equally to large-scale violence within societies. As the authors argue, violence was a continuum, ranging from small-scale, local actions to full-blown war. The latter was privileged legally and increasingly associated with states during early modernity, but its legitimacy was frequently contested and many of its violent forms, such as raiding and destruction of buildings and crops, could be found in activities not officially classed as war.

Open Access (free)
Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, David Philips, and Shurlee Swain

challenges a ‘commonsense understanding’ 2 of colonialism. The work of revisionist historians has ensured that Europeans can no longer claim ignorance of the devastating impact on Indigenous peoples of this particular type of colonial enterprise. But the alleged disorder and pragmatism of its administration, so candidly asserted as ‘irregular and arbitrary’ by one of its major protagonists, is perhaps less immediately brought to

in Equal subjects, unequal rights