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The reception of Christianity not mysterious, 1696–1702
Justin Champion

dissent which was almost more significant than the intellectual or theological propositions advanced by Toland in Christianity not mysterious. Christianity not mysterious has traditionally been understood as part of the ongoing debate about the nature of the Trinity that convulsed theological discourse in the 1690s.54 In particular the relationship between Christianity not mysterious and John Locke’s The Reasonableness of Christianity (1695) and the critical reception of the latter work within an anti-Trinitarian context, has meant that historiography has commonly seen

in Republican learning
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Beckett and nothing: trying to understand Beckett
Daniela Caselli

limits of interpretation in the oeuvre. However, in this volume neither intertextuality (or even the more affectively invested ‘influence’) nor context are simply welcomed with the sigh of relief that seems to have characterised their recent critical reception. They do not allow us to finally stop worrying about issues that elude the aesthetics and let us go back to good, honest, uncomplicated spade work: critics as diverse as Pilling, Cohn and Connor have always known that archive work was never that. Persuasive literary criticism has always, be it labelled humanist

in Beckett and nothing
Open Access (free)
‘Gothicism’, ‘historicism’, and the overlap of fictional modes from Thomas Leland to Walter Scott
Christina Morin

elements rigidly to the past. 31 What we see in gothic literature, Hoeveler contended, ‘is not a simple forward-moving trajectory that we would recognize as the Enlightenment project’, but, instead, ‘an oscillation in which the transcendent and traditional religious beliefs and tropes are alternately preserved and reanimated and then blasted and condemned’ – a wavering strikingly present in the Monthly Review 's appraisal of Otranto as well. 32 As is clear from the contrasting critical reception of the first and second

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
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Regina Maria Roche, the Minerva Press, and the bibliographic spread of Irish gothic fiction
Christina Morin

situated Irish gothic fiction at the centre of a newly understood transcontinental and transatlantic gothic literary production – an enduring cultural activity that spanned international borders and concomitantly contributed to, just as it was shaped by, transnational and cross-cultural exchange. The first part of this chapter accordingly offers a brief contextual consideration of Roche's career in London as well as the contemporary critical reception of her works. Despite rivalling in popularity Ann Radcliffe (1764–1823) and Isabella Kelly (c.1759

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
Jeremy C.A. Smith

civilisational level (see also Unay and Senel, 2009), Cox’s axiomatic comments are a significant contribution from the political sciences to the paradigm of civilisational analysis. They have not gone unnoticed and not escaped critical reception. The detractors cannot be addressed here, excepting one observation. Cox’s advanced theory of international political economy is the most striking attempt to marry civilisational analysis and a version of Marxism, and none of the critics address this aspect of Cox’s work. Cox’s vision of a pluri-​civilisational normative global order

in Debating civilisations
The unknowable image in The Winter’s Tale
Chloe Porter

, Image Ethics. Including a final chapter on The Winter’s Tale prior to his concluding ‘Coda’, Meek discusses the ‘statue scene’ in relation to its critical reception in Narrating the Visual , pp. 172–80. 7 O’Connell, The Idolatrous Eye , p. 141

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
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Individuality, identification and multidirectional memorialisation in post-genocide Rwanda
Ayala Maurer-Prager

(Abingdon: Routledge, 2013), p. 2. 2 J. Kristeva, Powers of Horror: An Essay on Abjection (New York: Columbia University Press, 1984), p. 1. 3 Ibid., p. 3. 4 See P. Gourevitch, We Wish to Inform You That Tomorrow We Will Be Killed with Our Families (London:  Picador, 2000). This book enjoyed a warm critical reception. Gourevitch was awarded the National Book Critics Circle Award, the George Polk Book Award, the Los Angeles Times Book Award, the Guardian First Book Award and the PEN/​Martha Albrand Award for First Nonfiction, among many others. The concern that some

in Human remains in society
Open Access (free)
Imposters, legislators and civil religion
Justin Champion

whether they merely took the opportunity of exploiting Toland’s work available in the same library. By 1719 Toland’s reputation in relation to his account of Moses had already been compromised by the critical reception of Origines Judaicae. Given the careful attention paid by all the participants to covering up the historical origins and authorship of the Traité, 182 MUP/Champion_08_Ch7 182 27/2/03, 10:24 am Respublica mosaica inclusion of such an easily recognisable extract would have prompted much finger pointing from Christian critics. What Toland was trying to

in Republican learning
David Hume’s History of England
Ben Dew

were established. Equally, however, as foundational values, these patterns of opinion played a fundamental role in holding up the commercial edifice on which English prosperity was based. As a consequence, his account provided both a powerful demonstration of the need to preserve England’s commercial foundations, and a warning regarding the consequences – essentially a return to the barbarism of the early medieval period – of not heeding history’s lessons. 6. Revisions to the History of England While Hume was initially disappointed both by the critical reception and

in Commerce, finance and statecraft