witchcraft on the borderline of religion and magic
Éva Pócs

. I can mention two of these in connection with the material under scrutiny here. One of them is the greater importance accorded to the role of the Devil in Eastern liturgy. In relation to this, in Orthodox Eastern Europe the peasants’ world-views and the popular beliefs of witchcraft are closely related to the church demonology’s concept of the Devil. In Western and Central Europe the heyday of the demonological concept of witchcraft, and

in Witchcraft Continued
Open Access (free)
Alison Rowlands

. Protestant demonology which emphasised the idea that many aspects of witchcraft were delusions caused by the devil might help support such a moderate elite viewpoint, as might a confessionally neutral awareness of the difficulty of proving witchcraft accusations unequivocally at law. It was not the size, cohesion or location of a territory which made it more or less likely to fall prey to the horrors of large-scale witch-trials in early modern Germany, then, but rather the question of whether and for how long this set of restraining factors pertained in its particular case

in Witchcraft narratives in Germany
Gender and contemporary fantasies of witchcraft
Alison Rowlands

events . . . through the framework of the witchcraft confession’, adopting ‘the language of demonology’ to explain their feelings.8 A ‘murdering’ mother? Magdalena Dürr, 1628–29 Can these ideas help us understand the gender-bias of the Rothenburg witchtrials? Let us begin to answer this question by examining the case of Magdalena Dürr, a twenty-eight-year-old woman from the village of Standorf who was arrested on 23 December 1628 on suspicion of having killed her eleven-weekold daughter four days earlier. Magdalena claimed that she had found the baby lying dead next to

in Witchcraft narratives in Germany
Alcuin Blamires

proclaim news of his divine forgiveness. Gowther marries her and they inherit the empire. Sir Gowther has seemed in the past too slight and eccentric, too brusque and melodramatic to attract much serious notice apart from MUP_McDonald_03_Ch2 45 11/18/03, 16:58 46 Alcuin Blamires classificatory investigation of its folktale affiliations and bureaucratic inquiry into its generic status.2 What modicum of attention it has otherwise gained has arisen because it draws upon the discourse of demonology on the one hand and the discourse of penitence on the other. The

in Pulp fictions of medieval England
William J. Bulman

demonology. Eastern religions, in particular, had traditionally been derided with primary reference to their diabolical origins. 13 English developments were variants within a pan-European process. From Elizabeth’s reign onwards, the most important discourses employed for diagnosing and narrating religious corruption – anti-popery and anti-puritanism – slowly became universalised in both their content and range of application. Before the end of the sixteenth century, anti-popery’s ambit had been extended

in Stereotypes and stereotyping in early modern England
Open Access (free)
Procedures of conscience and confession
Elwin Hofman

-WEST , 277–336. 74 SABR, AC-WEST , 262–213. 75 SABR, AC-WEST , 320–723. 76 Kounine, Imagining the Witch , chap. 3. 77 Virginia Krause, Witchcraft, Demonology, and Confession in Early Modern France (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015), pp. 36–7. 78 Elwin Hofman, ‘Corporeal truth: conscience, fear and the body in French criminal interrogations, 1750–1850’, Cultural and Social History , advance access (2020); Michael Niehaus, ‘“Wirkung einer Naturkraft”. Das Geständnis und sein Motiv in Diskursen um 1800’, in Jo Reichertz and Manfred

in Trials of the self
Open Access (free)
Rethinking early modern stereotyping in the twenty-first century
Koji Yamamoto
and
Peter Lake

carefully rejected in Stuart Clark’s landmark study of early modern demonology. Clark argued that stereotypical representations of demonology were closely interwoven with a bundle of intellectual traditions such as natural philosophy and Aristotelianism. 24 His account urges us to consider witchcraft as something in dialogue, and often in creative tension, with these intellectual currents. This study reminds us that certain stereotypes and the manner of their mobilisation were often informed by ideologies – a set

in Stereotypes and stereotyping in early modern England
Open Access (free)
The historian and the male witch
Lara Apps
and
Andrew Gow

of early modern demonology, Stuart Clark questions both the woman-hunting argument and the attribution of blame to demonologists. He points out that if witch-hunting was indeed a function of misogyny, then ‘we ought … to find woman-hating in abundance in those who most actively supported it. The problem is that we do not.’ 45 According to Clark, ‘early modern demonologists showed little interest either in

in Male witches in early modern Europe
Open Access (free)
Alison Rowlands

the Introduction. I say relatively little about demonology, other than where I can show that a particular text had influence on a particular trial, as I am of Ian Bostridge’s opinion that the persecution of witches and discourses about witchcraft have distinct, if overlapping, histories.17 Feminists and literary scholars in particular sometimes too readily assume simple causal relationships between what was written by demonologists and how witches were treated by judicial elites, without teasing out the many complex influences at work in trial-processes.18

in Witchcraft narratives in Germany
Open Access (free)
The state of surprise
Andrew Monaghan

background offers a means of highlighting authoritarianism, and of suggesting that Putin, the ‘anti-Yeltsin’ and ‘anti-Gorbachev’, seeks to ‘turn back the clock’ and repudiate the transformational policies of his predecessors. Indeed, in many ways, particularly since 2011, ‘Putinology’ has appeared as ‘demonology’, a line in the struggle of ‘good v. evil’. 67

in The new politics of Russia