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Open Access (free)
Brigitte Nerlich, Sarah Hartley, Sujatha Raman and Alexander Thomas T. Smith

and politics, policymakers have proposed various solutions, such as promoting greater public engagement with science and policy, co-design of scientific research with stakeholders, open and participatory forms of innovation, increasing transparency in scientific advice for policymaking, and enhancing open access to scientific data and research outputs. Such solutions have begun to exploit a number of new digital technologies and algorithms which can be used for good or for ill – for sharing information quickly; for making information public and available for public

in Science and the politics of openness
Open Access (free)
Utopia
Graeme Kirkpatrick

of subordination and domination in the workplace, which increasingly turn on subjects’ internalisation of behavioural and other norms, accompanied by an ideology in which people are made to feel responsible for everything that happens to them. These important works neglect to discuss how digital technology has been moulded to facilitate and enforce these processes. The changes these authors describe have implications for the critical theory of technology, since capitalist technology extends its hold over people into deeper recesses of their inner lives and social

in Technical politics
Open Access (free)
Old things with new things to say
James Paz

importance. In the midst of an information age, driven by revolutions in digital technologies, knowledge can be created and shared rapidly, global communication made possible in a heartbeat, networks expanded beyond all comprehension. Such advances facilitate very fast styles of learning and teaching –​from the immediate reproduction of images to the use of social media in classrooms –​but they can also lead to reassessments of the merits of slower forms of scholarship and pedagogy. Our understanding of the ‘voice’ or ‘agency’ or ‘otherness’ of things will inevitably be

in Nonhuman voices in Anglo-Saxon literature and material culture
Paul Henley

inhabitants. Later, he applied the same methods to a range of institutions, including a cruise ship, a women's prison and various military and naval units on active service. These developments in lightweight digital technology also underpinned the emergence of a new system for producing documentary series for British television around this time. This involved the commissioning, within the general rubric of a given series, of a number of freelance film-makers to make films for which they would act as camera operator, sound recordist and ‘on

in Beyond observation
Data becoming risk information
Nathaniel O’Grady

, however, they are but surface products that emanate from a multitude of institutionally situated, day-by-day, organisational processes constantly taking place in the FRS that engage data and digital technologies in different ways. In recent times, much work within critical security studies and within social science goes under the veneer of the information found in graphs and the like to inquire into how

in Security/ Mobility
Open Access (free)
Mapping times
Alex Gekker, Sam Hind, Sybille Lammes, Chris Perkins and Clancy Wilmott

-jetting’ practice (Joliveau, 2009). By the 1980s, digital mapping had slowly begun to supplant the dominance of printed maps, albeit in ways that were much less ephemeral than contemporary applications: technologies were deployed on desktops to fix and freeze possible futures, a means to an instrumental end. Affordances remained static – paper maps were increasingly made by deploying digital technologies, with users discernible from producers, in space and time. Maps were mobile things that could be deployed in different places, but the people deploying them were separate from

in Time for mapping
Open Access (free)
Memory and popular film
Paul Grainge

and digital technologies that are influencing the form and development of national and transnational modes of cultural remembrance. In different ways, the notion of authentic and territorialised memory, tied to personal and collective experience, has been challenged in a media world where the past may no longer be felt or understood in any culturally specific or referential sense. It is the perceived artificiality of memory, associated

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
From critical theory to technical politics
Graeme Kirkpatrick

separate, systems sphere beyond the scope of theories of social and cultural meaning. Technology, he argues, can be more or less meaningful depending on its social and historical location. One of his key innovations is to insist that both communication and the drive to create efficient and effective connections that characterise Habermas’s systems dimension are best understood as combined inside the technical sphere. This is a subtle introjection of the central opposition of Habermasian theory, and it has important consequences. 2 Digital technology and critique

in Technical politics
Open Access (free)
Graeme Kirkpatrick

no associated democratic advance. Nearly all of the digital technology that we use from day to day has a customisable interface, for example, enabling people to incorporate devices seamlessly into their lives, often transforming their embodied routines in the process. Since the late 1980s, interfaces on digital artefacts have been shaped by a design culture whose naturalist biases are largely consonant with Feenberg’s approved aesthetic. The emphasis has been on creating ‘environments’ that support both work and play, within which the human user does not have to

in Technical politics
Open Access (free)
Authorship, praxis, observation, ethnography
Paul Henley

of the second decade of the twenty-first century, by which time digital technology had brought the possibility of film-making within the range of both the technical capabilities and budgets of many millions of people the world over. During this period, there have also been major changes both in the conception of ethnography within academia and in the political constitution of the wider world. All of these factors have impacted on the development and diversification of the genre of ethnographic film, as I seek to show. This book has grown out of

in Beyond observation