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Philip Cerny

84 DISCIPLINES 6 International Political Economy philip cerny International Political Economy, domestic politics and democracy International Political Economy (IPE) had already achieved prominence as a field of study by the start of the 21st century, but its role has changed dramatically, with issues of democratic governance and policy-making moving to the forefront. Originally, however, the roots of IPE lay in economic aspects of relations among nation-states in the international system – foreign economic policy, trade, the spread of production systems and

in Democratization through the looking-glass
Open Access (free)
Reinterpreting Russia in the twenty-first century
Andrew Monaghan

prepares Western politicians and policy-makers for both realistic foreign policy and domestic political developments rather than desirable ones or wishful thinking. The mainstream view of Russia in the West has on one hand tended to see Russia as an appendage of Europe, one that is bound to Europe, rather than seeing it as a Eurasian state with interests not only in Europe but across the world. On the other

in The new politics of Russia
Open Access (free)
Jon Birger Skjærseth and Tora Skodvin

industry management perspectives, theories of domestic politics, and regime theory – we develop a multi-level approach based on three models that may account for differences and change in climate strategies. The first model – the Corporate Actor model – simply states that differences in climate strategies are due to differences in company-specific factors such as core business areas, resource reserves, environmental reputation and learning capacity. The second model – the Domestic Politics model – postulates that this is not necessarily so, and instead emphasises social

in Climate change and the oil industry
Open Access (free)
Shaun Breslin

for the political economists? Perhaps the details of state control and influence over the economy are best discussed elsewhere. But the important point is that analytical divisions between the national and the international, and between the political and the economic, obstruct a more nuanced understanding of domestic political processes and their impact on democratization in the contemporary world. As Gamble et al. (1996: 10) argue, ‘The separation between the global and the local no longer holds, as the new hierarchies of the global economy cut across regional and

in Democratization through the looking-glass
Open Access (free)
‘We’ve moved on’
Andrew Monaghan

question, Chapters 2 , 3 and 4 initially link to the central theme of the West’s anticipation of Russian transition, but each then turns towards more detailed exploration of the Russian views of the international environment and domestic developments, and thus offer different ways of interpreting Russian foreign policy and domestic politics. Beginning with the idea of the prevalent sense of

in The new politics of Russia
The logics underpining EU enlargement
Helene Sjursen and Karen E. Smith

of foreign and security policy. The classical realists, as well as their inheritors the neo-realists and neo-liberal institutionalists, ground their analysis in assumptions drawn from a logic of consequences (Baldwin 1993 ; Moravcsik 1998 ; Krasner 1999 ). It is often argued that this approach is particularly suited to studies of foreign policy issues (as opposed to domestic political issues) because of the assumption of international anarchy

in Rethinking European Union Foreign Policy
Open Access (free)
Jon Birger Skjærseth and Tora Skodvin

’s climate strategy, with an emphasis on factors such as environmental risk, environmental reputation and organisational learning capacity. The second model, referred to as the Domestic Politics (DP) model, is based on the assumption that even multinational companies are heavily influenced by the framework conditions of their home-base countries in which they have their historical roots, have located their headquarters and have their main activities. This model is based on theories of state–society relationships and highlights social demands for environmental quality

in Climate change and the oil industry
Open Access (free)
Elana Wilson Rowe

transboundary pollutants; and opening up new areas for cooperation, such as the recent Central Arctic Ocean fisheries treaty. The continued engagement of the United States and Russia in regional politics as both active and ‘resting’ great powers is, in other words, essential for maintaining and expanding cooperation. Global politics today is marked by enduring, seemingly unresolvable strife and suffering in regional wars and proxy wars; a growing preoccupation with putting domestic politics ‘first’; and a populist backlash against expert knowledge, including against the

in Arctic governance
Andrew Monaghan

debate since 2004; and apparently unconscious, in that they repeated almost verbatim the debate that had taken place about the possibility of a Colour Revolution in Russia and Putin being forced from power in 2005. 6 Taken together, therefore, the mainstream debate about Russian domestic politics has often complemented the view about Russia being a member of the Western family of nations discussed in

in The new politics of Russia
Open Access (free)
Peter Burnell

parts grope towards deciding what kind of 252 DEMOCRATIZATION THROUGH THE LOOKING-GLASS political entity the EU should become and whether, or how, it could be made more democratic. The potential for ordinary people to influence through political processes the economic vectors that can make so much difference to their daily lives emerges as a central topic that seems ripe for further study (the key question being not what political economy perspectives might have to offer but whether it is any longer meaningful to isolate for purpose of analysis the purely domestic

in Democratization through the looking-glass