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Fixing the past in English war films
Fred Inglis

recognising the Union Jack as their national flag), still less to the 5 per cent of the population whose parents left the old empire some time between 1950 and 1970 or so for the promise of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness as held out in Birmingham, Bradford, Liverpool, East London and elsewhere. In part, indeed, I am addressing that smallish diaspora, since they came to what was thought of, not

in British cinema of the 1950s
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

been excised or downplayed in a host of studies of the twentieth century. The themes of empire and perpetual war were important reference points in this reassessment. Therefore, as a project, Untold History was nothing less than a repudiation of Luce’s prophecy and the corresponding call to arms and psychological hold that his ‘American Century’ concept had had on the nation’s psyche for more than seventy years. Despite the vehemence of this repudiation, Stone’s public declarations and cinematic position on war and empire have never simply aspired to isolationism. He

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
The King’s Speech as melodrama
Nicola Rehling

Kings Speech presents Bertie as a victim and the primary point of the spectator’s identification. A title card informs us that the King asked Prince Albert to give the opening address to the Empire Exhibition in 1925 – his ‘inaugural broadcast to the nation and the world’, the BBC announcer tells his audience. This is then followed by a series of close-ups of the microphone, a repeated motif throughout

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
Quentin Crisp as Orlando’s Elizabeth I
Glyn Davis

setting of each movement calls attention to the film’s irreality. […] The excess of the costumes and ridiculousness of the infinite ritual and pomp offer a kind of ongoing visual satire of the historical conventions of bourgeois English manners, gender comportment and, less rigorously, empire. 17 Indeed Potter

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

viewpoint: it is what comes naturally to them. It’s not done out of malice, they don’t know any better –​they find it hard to become more international. A British journalist, perhaps because he comes from a smaller country, goes out and sees the world. I don’t believe the American journalist does that –​certainly the ones that belong to the mainstream. Even the New York Times, which is supposed to be the most liberal, is pro-​empire. American interests come first. In the handling of stories like Iran and even Cuba, you never get the full historical background. We never go

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Sarah Easen

. Originally the plan for a 1951 festival derived from the centenary of the Great Exhibition of 1851 which showcased the achievements of newly industrialised Victorian society and its global empire. Gerald Barry, editor of the left-wing News Chronicle , had championed the idea in 1945. The government decided to set up the Ramsden Committee to investigate the idea of a ‘Universal International Exhibition

in British cinema of the 1950s
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

everything passes, even the empire of the USA. As to whether a deal might be made with the USA, Castro talks about the difficulty of trusting the USA to keep its word. He concludes that: ‘The only thing the US accepts is that you sell out.’ Looking for Fidel certainly produced a more rounded appraisal of Castro, although one that happened by accident or insistence –​HBO’s somewhat confused position on the subject –​rather than design. Castro finally stood down as president on 24 February 2008, confirming that he was in poor health; however, following some rehabilitation

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
The Pony Express at the Diamond Jubilee
Heidi Kenaga

. 36 Both The Covered Wagon and The Pony Express had focused on the strategic significance of a wagon train’s ‘cargo’ of infants. In the first film, an aged man, while cooing over a newborn, comments to the pioneers that it is ‘more important to get these babies across than it is the grown folks – they’re the real Empire Builders’. And later, an

in Memory and popular film
Screening Victoria
Steven Fielding

throughout the Empire. Julian Fellowes, who wrote The Young Victoria , also asserted that everything in his script was ‘based entirely on fact’. That was true, but only up to a point. A madman did fire a shot at Victoria. But Prince Albert did not – as Fellowes has it – take the bullet in the chest to prevent the Queen’s assassination, thereby finally convincing Victoria of his love for her. 28 Thanks

in The British monarchy on screen
James Downs

sites with which it deals. … I am speaking not merely of a piece of motion picture entertainment, but of what is potentially the greatest piece of British Empire propaganda that has yet been attempted by the cinema. Grandcourt proceeded to stress the patriotic appeal of the film, asking for royal co-operation ‘to

in The British monarchy on screen