Search results

You are looking at 11 - 20 of 30 items for :

  • Manchester Film and Media Studies x
Clear All
Art, authorship and activism
Authors: Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

This book charts and analyses the work of Oliver Stone – arguably one of the foremost political filmmakers in Hollywood during the last thirty years. Drawing on previously unseen production files from Oliver Stone’s personal archives and hours of interviews both with Stone and a range of present and former associates within the industry, the book employs a thematic structure to explore Stone’s life and work in terms of war, politics, money, love and corporations. This allows the authors both to provide a synthesis of earlier and later film work as well as locate that work within Stone’s developing critique of government. The book explores the development of aesthetic changes in Stone’s filmmaking and locates those changes within ongoing academic debates about the relationship between film and history as well as wider debates about Hollywood and the film industry. All of this is explored with detailed reference to the films themselves and related to a set of wider concerns that Stone has sought to grapple with -the American Century, exceptionalism and the American Dream, global empire, government surveillance and corporate accountability. The book concludes with a perspective on Stone’s ‘brand’ as not just an auteur and commercially viable independent filmmaker but as an activist arguing for a very distinct kind of American exceptionalism that seeks a positive role for the US globally whilst eschewing military adventurism.

Open Access (free)
The Queen in Australia
Jane Landman

Commonwealth conquest of Everest, an event broadly reported as a royal tribute. 2 These events bracket a period of Commonwealth optimism, a temporary pause between the imperial ‘implosions’ of the late 1940s (the independence of India, Pakistan, Ceylon/Sri Lanka and Burma) and the next round of Empire-diminishing events (e.g. Suez in 1956–57, followed by African decolonisation starting in the early 1960s). 3

in The British monarchy on screen
An allegory of imperial rapport
Deirdre Gilfedder

, the Scot heals an English monarch in mourning, while in Hooper’s The King’s Speech , the future monarch suffers from the crippling condition of a speech impediment. Life-blood is needed from somewhere in the realm, and in The King’s Speech , it is drawn from the Empire. The question of representing monarchy spreads beyond Britain’s metropolitan borders, and this film pictures the sovereign’s ‘help

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
Mandy Merck

political meanings – of Crown and Parliament, Empire and Commonwealth, sovereign and subject – do these moving images convey? How are these meanings assimilated to the commercial significance of royalty? Or indeed to the commercial imperatives of the media industries that portray them? If, as many commentators and the British Council itself maintain, the Olympic opening ceremony was a triumphant celebration of the

in The British monarchy on screen
A lost epic of the reign of Victoria
Jude Cowan Montague

accurately reconstruct events applied the West End theatre tradition of combining well-researched design with historical drama. The filmmakers benefited from the London theatre infrastructure, such as the suppliers then profiting from the fashion for historical romantic pictures. 19 Barker could supplement what was available through these companies with the props and costumes of the Empire Theatre (noted

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
Fixing the past in English war films
Fred Inglis

recognising the Union Jack as their national flag), still less to the 5 per cent of the population whose parents left the old empire some time between 1950 and 1970 or so for the promise of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness as held out in Birmingham, Bradford, Liverpool, East London and elsewhere. In part, indeed, I am addressing that smallish diaspora, since they came to what was thought of, not

in British cinema of the 1950s
Open Access (free)
The King’s Speech as melodrama
Nicola Rehling

Kings Speech presents Bertie as a victim and the primary point of the spectator’s identification. A title card informs us that the King asked Prince Albert to give the opening address to the Empire Exhibition in 1925 – his ‘inaugural broadcast to the nation and the world’, the BBC announcer tells his audience. This is then followed by a series of close-ups of the microphone, a repeated motif throughout

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
Quentin Crisp as Orlando’s Elizabeth I
Glyn Davis

setting of each movement calls attention to the film’s irreality. […] The excess of the costumes and ridiculousness of the infinite ritual and pomp offer a kind of ongoing visual satire of the historical conventions of bourgeois English manners, gender comportment and, less rigorously, empire. 17 Indeed Potter

in The British monarchy on screen
Sarah Easen

. Originally the plan for a 1951 festival derived from the centenary of the Great Exhibition of 1851 which showcased the achievements of newly industrialised Victorian society and its global empire. Gerald Barry, editor of the left-wing News Chronicle , had championed the idea in 1945. The government decided to set up the Ramsden Committee to investigate the idea of a ‘Universal International Exhibition

in British cinema of the 1950s
James Downs

sites with which it deals. … I am speaking not merely of a piece of motion picture entertainment, but of what is potentially the greatest piece of British Empire propaganda that has yet been attempted by the cinema. Grandcourt proceeded to stress the patriotic appeal of the film, asking for royal co-operation ‘to

in The British monarchy on screen