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Or, get off the beach
Ingrid Horrocks

, and we know not how many more places in our Eastern empire. 1 During this life of global mobility, Earle also lived in New South Wales, Australia, and, most pertinently for this chapter, in Aotearoa New Zealand, writing the travel book A Narrative of Nine Months’ Residence in New Zealand, in 1827 (1832). 2 Although Earle’s works were originally produced primarily for a metropolitan audience in London, they have since made him one of the most important European visual artists of Aotearoa New Zealand working immediately prior to formal colonisation, as well

in Worlding the south
The island as collective in the works of Louis Becke
Jennifer Fuller

of a life-time. 1 The Earl of Pembroke’s introduction to Louis Becke’s collection of short stories By Reef and Palm (1894) raises important questions about the nature of colonial Pacific fiction and the role of romance in the age of realism. By the late nineteenth century, the novel had established itself as literature’s primary popular medium and took for its focus the lives of average, often metropolitan, British citizens. Yet such novels proved inadequate to express the concerns of a growing Empire, which seemed to need genres to evolve overnight to

in Worlding the south
An unexpected text in an unexpected place
Michelle Elleray

managerial time spent on discovering petty theft, and hardly a week passed without the summary dismissal of at least one dock labourer’. 11 Kiro thus finds himself inserted into a specific set of economic tensions between the opportunistic thief and the loss-fearing merchant. As their name signals, moreover, the economics of the West India Docks are integrally tied to a colonial history. Invoking a key region of the British Empire, the West India Docks were predicated on economic relations with the Caribbean, and were built to secure the financial interests of planters

in Worlding the south
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Petitions, politics, and the African Christian converts of the nineteenth century
Hlonipha Mokoena

their relationship to the Empire and especially to Queen Victoria are what distinguishes their writing from any other type of political writing in South Africa. In their constant interaction with not just settlers but a variety of colonial and imperial officials, these petitioners often spoke the language of legal rights more consistently and more forcefully than would have been expected at the time. The main endowment that made such a petition culture possible was the arrival of the printing press in southern Africa and the manner in which this technology changed

in Worlding the south
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Where postcolonialism is neo-orientalist – the cases of Sarojini Naidu and Arundhati Roy
Elleke Boehmer

:john:Public:John's Mac: John's Job Stories of women ways in which the west has always scrutinised and objectified the other, whether the east in the case of India, or the south more generally? Aren’t there elements of this criticism that create a profound sense of déja vu? Have Indian writers not been feted and exceptionalised in this way before, at the height of Empire, and feted in very similar terms? Expanding these questions, the neo-orientalist tendency I want to underline is a critical inclination to regard as more culturally alive, interestingly authentic and intensively

in Stories of women
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Antipodean life as a comparative exercise
Sarah Comyn

Courier ’s reprint included an attribution to the Scottish-born Australian poet, James Brunton Stephens. For the prevalence of reprinting in Australian newspapers and periodicals, and the relationship between metropolitan and provincial publications, see, e.g., Katherine Bode, ‘Fictional Systems: Mass-Digitization, Network Analysis, and Nineteenth-Century Australian Newspapers’, Victorian Periodicals Review , 50:1 (2017), 100–38; and Elizabeth Webby, ‘Australia’, in J. Don Vann and Rosemary T. VanArsdel (eds), Periodicals of Queen Victoria’s Empire: An Exploration

in Worlding the south
Open Access (free)
Cultural geographies of poetry in colonial Aotearoa
Nikki Hessell

. As a member of parliament, Macaulay might have been present in the House of Commons on 7 July 1840, when British MPs debated the nature of the new arrangements in the colony. His awareness of a Māori figure, of the sort he describes, would have emerged from within the political discourse around this new international treaty and the visits to Great Britain of various Māori intellectuals and leaders. Macaulay’s Māori was mobile, traversing not only the geographic space between England and Aotearoa, and the temporal space between the flourishing Empire and its

in Worlding the south
Theorising the en-gendered nation
Elleke Boehmer

To this the response must be that no matter how widely entrenched the symbols, nor yet how iconoclastic, recuperative or revolutionary the ideology – and its power against empire has indeed been important and immense – nationalism’s vocabularies of self-representation do matter; fundamentally so. As I have emphasised, it is not merely the case that nationalism springs from masculinised iconographies, social memories and state structures (this would be the ‘soft’ argument for the nation as a gendered construct). It is also that, the nation’s liberatory promises to

in Stories of women
Globes, panoramas, fictions, and oceans
Peter Otto

and the infinite details of its places.’ 11 In both contexts, the globe also represents the power to ‘englobe’, to bring a disorganised mass into an ordered whole, which is exercised by gods in the creation of worlds and by kings in the creation of empires. It follows therefore that for some, such as John Desaguliers, Newton’s philosophy is ‘the only true Philosophy ’ and, the law-abiding universe it describes, the ‘ perfect Model ’ of good government. 12 One assumes that gods are able easily to grasp ‘at the same time the whole of terrestrial form and the

in Worlding the south
Wordlists, songs, and knowledge production on the colonial Australian frontier
Anna Johnston

Empire. In Australia, James Cook’s Endeavour journals provide the first hundred or so Indigenous words collected, in the Guugu Yimidhirr language of Cape York Peninsula. Early attempts to learn Australian Indigenous languages tended to be undertaken by individuals marked by a personal curiosity and, often, close relationships with particular Indigenous individuals or groups. Yet because of the vast array and complexity of Indigenous Australian languages – estimated to be over 300 in the precolonial period – the task was difficult; the work was local and inchoate

in Worlding the south