A Congolese Experience
Justine Brabant

or region they are unfamiliar with are previous articles on the subject by their media outlet. The same Le Monde journalist explained how he would gather information before leaving on assignment: Even if it was an emergency, we would ask the archives to prepare a file. (...) I would ask the archives to prepare – it might take an hour – as complete a file as possible: the longest articles we had done, a sheet with most recent population/ethnicity

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Sean Healy and Victoria Russell

‘Mass deportations and ethnic cleansing is morally justified to counter this, and these bleeding heart NGO’s [ sic ] will be wholly responsible.’ Then, a second video, ‘La verità sui MIGRANTI’ ( Donadel, 2017 ), was uploaded to YouTube in March 2017 by a 23-year-old Italian right-wing activist and vlogger Luca Donadel. It used a similar methodology as the earlier Gefira video, including tracing the routes of rescue vessels on a map from close to Libya

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Corporations, Celebrities and the Construction of the Entrepreneurial Refugee Woman
Annika Bergman Rosamond and Catia Gregoratti

Kenya, the Maasai tribes are known for handcrafting their beaded jewelry – colorful necklaces, bracelets and pendants – to maintain their pastoral lifestyle and in Ghana’s Akan ethnic group, they handcraft Kente, a type of silk and cotton fabric made of interwoven cloth strips, now known around the world’ ( Rigou, 2018 ). Hence, the main problem representation of RefuSHE is women’s positioning within displacement and structural

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Megan Daigle, Sarah Martin, and Henri Myrttinen

been shot while deployed – one who was sleeping with a married woman, and another who had favoured one ethnic group over another in his work. ‘The danger wasn’t that ,’ he said, miming a military stance and cocking a rifle. ‘It was human. It’s more about navigating the social and political terrain.’ 31 Another told us: I worked in Iran and had to wear a headscarf there …. My scarf kept slipping and I was put under house arrest by the police because I

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Author: Sara De Vido

The book explores the relationship between violence against women on one hand, and the rights to health and reproductive health on the other. It argues that violation of the right to health is a consequence of violence, and that (state) health policies might be a cause of – or create the conditions for – violence against women. It significantly contributes to feminist and international human rights legal scholarship by conceptualising a new ground-breaking idea, violence against women’s health (VAWH), using the Hippocratic paradigm as the backbone of the analysis. The two dimensions of violence at the core of the book – the horizontal, ‘interpersonal’ dimension and the vertical ‘state policies’ dimension – are investigated through around 70 decisions of domestic, regional and international judicial or quasi-judicial bodies (the anamnesis). The concept of VAWH, drawn from the anamnesis, enriches the traditional concept of violence against women with a human rights-based approach to autonomy and a reflection on the pervasiveness of patterns of discrimination (diagnosis). VAWH as theorised in the book allows the reconceptualisation of states’ obligations in an innovative way, by identifying for both dimensions obligations of result, due diligence obligations, and obligations to progressively take steps (treatment). The book eventually asks whether it is not international law itself that is the ultimate cause of VAWH (prognosis).

Open Access (free)
The narrative
Sara De Vido

at the same time at the very basis of any form of VAW and the outcome of VAW, an obstacle to the achievement of gender equality.3 In legal analysis great emphasis has been placed over time on discrimination on the basis of sex, which is often intertwined with other bases such as ethnicity, religion, age and sexual orientation. However, in investigating the phenomenon of violence, an aspect has not been explored sufficiently: violence may severely affect women’s health, and in particular reproductive health. As pointed out by the UN Committee on the Elimination of

in Violence against women’s health in international law
Open Access (free)
A conceptualisation of violence against women’s health (VAWH)
Sara De Vido

right to respect for private and family life and the prohibition of torture, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment. Nonetheless, when it comes to the prohibition of discrimination under Article 14 ECHR, as I have already mentioned, the Court has missed the opportunity to tackle these cases as discrimination, and intersectional discrimination more specifically.43 In I.G. and others v. Slovakia, for example, the Court first found that the practice of sterilising women without their prior, informed consent ‘affected vulnerable individuals from various ethnic

in Violence against women’s health in international law
Open Access (free)
‘Case history’ on violence against women, and against women’s rights to health and to reproductive health
Sara De Vido

discrimination linked to the enforcement of protection orders, ‘a problem that has disproportionately affected women,’ especially those belonging to ethnic and racial minorities.70 The Commission, relying on previous InterAmerican and European jurisprudence, and on UN treaty bodies’ quasi-jurisprudence, based its reasoning on the concept of due diligence obligations.71 Having considered the facts of the case, it concluded that the state had failed to act with due diligence to protect Lenahan and her daughters from domestic violence, and that it had violated the principle of

in Violence against women’s health in international law
Open Access (free)
Reconceptualising states’ obligations in countering VAWH
Sara De Vido

international level – something that could be dangerous – but rather which lines of discrimination, in a given context, prompt the perpetrating of VAWH. This means, in other words, conceiving intersectionality as a tool for understanding VAWH. Based on which grounds is VAWH perpetrated? On the basis of sex or gender, or also on ethnicity, religious or social and economic conditions (here, for example, girls who at the age of 12 want to change their genitals because they ‘do not like them’ and have the money to undergo cosmetic surgery)? Intersectionality is rarely considered

in Violence against women’s health in international law
Richard Parrish

sport can act as a tool to promote more tolerant attitudes towards specific groups in European society such as ethnic minorities and the disabled. Third, sporting platforms can help promote an awareness of the environment. Fourth, sport is inextricably linked to public health as participation in sport is an important preventative weapon in the fight against ill health. Fifth, a major issue in European and world sport is doping. The document argues that the EU lacks competence to act in doping matters but action can be taken in the context of other policy areas (such

in Sports law and policy in the European Union