Open Access (free)
Alex Warleigh

from others like ‘global justice’ or ‘ethical foreign policy’. In EU member states, national reform is restricted to some extent by EU norms such as the (albeit challenged) primacy of EU law. For the EU as a whole, democratization involves issues of political identity construction. These offer a laboratory for the study of how different communities can become part of a collective political culture. Finally, and optimistically, the EU case suggests that democratization is a difficult, rather than an impossible, project. The Union has by no means succeeded in meeting

in Democratization through the looking-glass
Open Access (free)
Rainer Bauböck

others. It is not, however, a consequence of the fact that states have boundaries demarcating their territorial jurisdiction and special responsibilities for their citizens. The horizontal pluralism of polities is, in my view, a normatively desirable feature of the state system in the sense that it would be wrong to try to overcome it. This may not be obvious from a perspective of global justice, but it seems to me compelling from a perspective

in Democratic inclusion
Tarik Kochi

) has sparked a small academic discourse of recognition theory and its application to identity politics, questions of moral and political rights and issues of global justice. While aspects of recognition theory have been adopted in interesting ways within feminism and postcolonial studies, perhaps the predominant branch has been utilized by liberal political theory with rather

in Recognition and Global Politics
Open Access (free)
David Bruce MacDonald

hopelessly inscrutable to the outsider (ibid. pp. 22–3). 4 Geoffrey Robertson, Crimes Against Humanity: The Struggle for Global Justice (London: Penguin, 2000). Robertson provides a useful outline of human rights legislation in his ‘Preface’ (see pp. xiii–xiv). For an excellent description of the evolution of Human Rights norms and legislation after the Second World War, see Louis Henkin, ‘Human Rights: Ideology and Aspiration, Reality and Prospect’, in Samantha Power and Graham Allison (eds), Realizing Human Rights: Moving from Inspiration to Impact (New York: St Martin

in Balkan holocausts?
Open Access (free)
Their basis and limits
Catriona McKinnon

Coin’, p. 16. 16 C. Jones, Global Justice (Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1999), p. 94. 17 O’Neill, Towards Justice and Virtue , p. 134. 18 O’Neill, Towards Justice and Virtue , p. 135

in Political concepts
David Miller

–152 . Saunders , Ben 2012 . “ Defining the Demos .” Politics, Philosophy and Economics 11 : 280–301 . Song , Sarah 2012 . “ The Boundary Problem in Democratic Theory: Why the Demos should be Bounded by the State .” International Theory 4 : 39–68 . Vernon , Richard 2010 . Cosmopolitan Regard: Political Membership and Global Justice

in Democratic inclusion
Open Access (free)
Convergence, emergence and divergence
Simon Parry

science and technology, and between science and society in the ultimate, unified technoscientific performance. It realises technoscience – so the co-production of knowledge and technologies – as an apparently coherent and coordinated programme.4 Such technoscientific programmes in their various forms have been subject to systematic critique from liberal, feminist, postcolonial, global justice and queer theoretical perspectives. These different perspectives have exerted their own performance pressure, emerging from and giving rise to a variety of performative practices

in Science in performance
Curse or blessing?
Simona Giordano

organizing a major area of social and economic activity. (2015: 80) Western governments have considered population ageing as ‘a mixed blessing’ (Phillipson 2015). Longevity raises a number of ethical, social and political issues as well as issues of global justice. Will the labour force be able to assist the evergrowing proportion of older people? Will healthcare systems be able to cope with the demands of a long-lived generation? It also raises ethical and political issues of intergenerational and global justice: what do we owe to future generations? And what do we owe

in The freedom of scientific research
Open Access (free)
A pluralist theory of citizenship
Rainer Bauböck

subdividing them into three distinct sets of questions: justice within political communities (domestic), justice between political communities (inter-polity) and justice across political communities (trans-polity and global). 8 Of course, theorists of global justice and cosmopolitan democracy generally do not imagine a single undifferentiated polity encompassing all human beings. What they intend to challenge is not so much the

in Democratic inclusion
Simone de Beauvoir and a Global Theory of Feminist Recognition
Monica Mookherjee

assistance owed to citizens of distant countries. More recent, critical forms of cosmopolitanism, associated with Continental writers like Julia Kristeva ( 1991 ), focus on a symbolic decentring of the citizen as a member of a world community in order to foster global justice projects which are not confined to issues of resource distribution as such

in Recognition and Global Politics