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’s perceived relentless and violent anti-Judaism, than by any intrinsic lack of literary or cultural value. The variety of new readings generated by this poem which once existed, as Ralph Hanna notes, ‘on the suppressed margins of critical attention, unaccompanied by commentary’,3 testifies to its increasing importance in medieval studies. Yet even as a community of readers work to recuperate Jerusalem from its marginal placement, with few exceptions they continue to read the narrative as thoroughly anti-Judaic.4 My argument concerning the poem is predicated on a

in Pulp fictions of medieval England
Le Bone Florence of Rome and bourgeois self-making

from similar elite milieux. Derek Pearsall, ‘The development of Middle English romance’, Medieval Studies, 27 (1965), 91–116 (p. 92). See A. McIntosh, M. Samuels and M. Benskin, A Linguistic Atlas of Late Medieval England, 4 vols (Aberdeen, 1986), vol. 4, LP 531. This is a variant version of The Child of Bristow, which has been discussed by Barbara Hanawalt, ‘“The Childe of Bristowe” and the making of middle-class adolescence’, in Barbara A. Hanawalt and David Wallace (eds), Bodies and Disciplines: Intersections of Literature and History in Fifteenth-Century England

in Pulp fictions of medieval England

me ultimately to pursue a career in this field was the warmth with which I was initially welcomed into a community of scholars, in particular the New York based Colloquium for Early Medieval Studies (formerly known as the ASSC). I expect others have had similar experiences, but I also know that many have not. It is my impression that the field as a whole and the majority of its individual members tend to welcome with enthusiasm those who share an interest in the culture and literature of early medieval England, yet some who share this interest have experienced a

in Dating Beowulf
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, see Peterson (“Laurel crown”); for the ongoing payment of the annuity, see Berry and Timings (“Spenser’s pension”). In a recent unpublished paper, Jean R. Brink has argued that Spenser sold his pension to Thomas Walker (Brink, “Spenser’s death revisited,” 49th International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, MI, May 8–11, 2014). Whether Berry and Timings or Brink is correct does not affect my point here, which centers on Spenser’s staying sufficiently in the good graces of the court that his pension was not affected by the uproar over the Complaints volume

in Spenserian satire
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race and medieval studies at http://www.inthemedievalmiddle.com/2017/06/morevoices-citation-inclusion-and.html (accessed 5 June 2019). The Medievalists of Color website is http://medievalistsofcolor.com . My thanks to Eileen Joy, Dana Oswald, Mary Rambaran-Olm, and the editors for their comments on a draft of this chapter. I am solely responsible for any remaining errors and infelicities.

in Dating Beowulf
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Emotional connections to the young hero in Beowulf

character beyond the question of his fitness to rule. The recent affective turn in medieval studies in general, and in early medieval English studies in particular, facilitates a more multivalent analysis of Wiglaf's emergent heroism, one that includes the interrogation of emotion in interpersonal relationship as well as the more usual military and political endeavours. 7 The 2015 publication of Anglo-Saxon Emotions decisively marked a turn towards the study of emotion in Old English texts and

in Dating Beowulf
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Geoffrey Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde and John Lydgate’s Troy Book

medieval studies, see Holly Crocker’s introduction to the postmedieval forum discussion on the status of academic review, ‘Introduction: how open, or, can vulnerability go digital?’ Online at https://postmedieval-forum.com/ forums/forum-ii-states-of-review/introduction/ along with the other essay distributed in this forum. Corrective reading 59 26 See Appendix A for other examples of invitations to emend; that quoted from William Caxton can be found in his publication of the Golden Legend, excerpted in The prologues and epilogues of William Caxton, EETS 176, ed. W. J

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England
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medievalists know, she asserts, that ‘the pleasure of knowledgeable discourses on pleasure’ is what we ‘deliver to our audiences’, we have assumed as our ‘ethical task’ to ‘discipline’ enjoyment out of academic inquiry. In other words, medieval studies (as a modern academic discipline) has invested medieval culture with a seriousness (what Fradenberg calls ‘an ethos of pietas’) that marginalises or denies those aspects of the culture that are predominantly productive of enjoyment.31 So far as popular romance is concerned (a genre Fradenberg does not consider directly), I

in Pulp fictions of medieval England

Medieval England (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press), pp. 150–68. Bardsley, S. (1999), ‘Women’s work reconsidered: gender and wage differentiation in late medieval England’, Past and Present, 165, 3–29. Bardsley, S. (2001), ‘Reply’, Past and Present, 173, 199–202. Barron, C. M. (1989), ‘The ‘Golden Age’ of women in Medieval London’, Reading Medieval Studies, 15, 35–58. Bennett, J. (1988), ‘“History that stands still”: women’s work in the European past’, Feminist Studies, 14, 269–83. Bennett, J. (2010), ‘Compulsory service in late medieval England’, Past and Present

in Making work more equal
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Troubling race, ethnicity, and masculinity in Beowulf

Stephen Harris, Race and ethnicity in Anglo-Saxon literature (London: Routledge, 2003), p. 35. 7 The issues are vast, interconnected, and wide-reaching – for a few points of entry see https://www.chronicle.com/article/Prominent-Medieval-Scholar-s/235014 ; https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2017/09/19/one-professors-critique-another-divides-medieval-studies ; and https://www.salon.com/2017/11/30/alt

in Dating Beowulf