Open Access (free)
Self-entrapment in Waiting for Godot
John Robert Keller

, represents the maternal side of an early dyadic relationship in which the mother is experienced as absent, something that forms the emotional background of the play’s represented internal world. The various relationships within the play are dyadic and fluid, with characters assuming various mother/infant roles in condensation; the types of couples formed reflect the primary experience of maternal absence and failure of containment.2 The play reflects a state of being, or rather of not-being, with the mother, and the various constellations of characters and their emotional

in Samuel Beckett and the primacy of love
Open Access (free)
Gill Rye and Michael Worton

be carefully and lovingly dissected. In a different way, Sylvie Germain’s novels engage the reader in a politics of reading in which the author’s self invades the text in the form of her religious belief to the extent of closing off freedom of interpretation. As the last chapter identifies, a recurrent theme in Escalle’s novels is the difficult relationships her female protagonists have with their mothers, and it is striking how frequently variations on the mother–daughter theme have appeared throughout this volume. However one considers it, the mother

in Women’s writing in contemporary France
Open Access (free)
Mother–daughter relations in Paule Constant’s fiction
Gill Rye

   Lost and found: mother–daughter relations in Paule Constant’s fiction In  Paule Constant won the Prix Goncourt for her seventh novel Confidence pour confidence to much controversy. Her novels had been shortlisted for the Goncourt several times before, and she had gained many other literary prizes. However, press coverage was generally of the opinion that, although the most prestigious French literary prize was long overdue to her, Confidence pour confidence itself was not especially deserving of that glory. The controversial reception afforded this

in Women’s writing in contemporary France
Open Access (free)
John Robert Keller

reader will gain an appreciation of what I believe to be the fundamental emotional force that organizes his work – a need for contact with a primary, loving other. I will suggest that deeply embedded in his fiction and dramatic work is an enduring psychological struggle to engage the primal mother, in order to maintain a complete, enduring sense of selfhood. Within his work, this struggle and its consequences reflect universal experiences at the edge of the earliest moments of human life, experiences that have at their core the integrative qualities of maternal love

in Samuel Beckett and the primacy of love
The first child-witch in Rothenburg, 1587
Alison Rowlands

to investigate it threatened – albeit usually only fleetingly – to produce verdicts of guilt against alleged witches, and even to foster larger-scale episodes of witch-hunting. This happened for the first time in Rothenburg in 1587, when a six-year-old boy called Hans Gackstatt from the hinterland village of Hilgartshausen, told a tale of nocturnal flight to a witches’ dance which started an investigation of dubious legality and physical severity against his mother and himself from which other inhabitants of Hilgartshausen were not initially entirely safe. The

in Witchcraft narratives in Germany
Open Access (free)
Janet Wolff

5: Austerity baby I seem not to have made such a good impression when I arrived, at least not on my mother. She started keeping a baby diary on 5 July 1943, just over three months after I was born. Arrived a few days after schedule at 6.10 am Thursday. Very tiny, ugly and thin – folds of skin without any fat. Weighed 6lbs. 4ozs. She improved rapidly however – or maybe I just got more used to her, but even so when we went home (5/4/43) she wasn’t very beautiful. She gained weight very quickly & was soon looking very sweet and lovely – not only my opinion

in Austerity baby
Open Access (free)
Chantal Chawaf ’s melancholic autofiction
Kathryn Robson

described as ‘melancholic autofiction’, melancholic autobiographical fiction. We know from interviews and publicity notices accompanying Chawaf ’s texts that she was born during a bomb explosion in Paris in  in which her parents were killed and she was extracted from her dying mother’s womb by Caesarian section.2 Since Chawaf ’s first novel Retable/La Rêverie (), which features a melancholic orphan whose parents were killed in a bomb explosion in the Second World War, her novels have repeatedly returned to fictionalised scenes of parental death.3 This chapter deals

in Women’s writing in contemporary France
Bonnie Evans

The disruption of harmony Most people are aware of many controversies surrounding autism today, as well as those that abounded in the 1960s asserting the fault of mothers in causing the condition. Other major controversies have centred on the MMR vaccine and the use of mercury in vaccines. More recently, debates have exploded over whether autism

in The metamorphosis of autism
Revolutionary nationalism and women’s representation in Ngugi wa Thiong’o
Elleke Boehmer

women in ‘the people’s’ struggle. Investing his leading women characters with the dignity of ages or with an almost bionic power, Ngugi has erected heroines of immense, if not impossible, stature: either great mothers of a future Kenya, or aggressive, gun-toting (effectively masculinised) revolutionaries. As he does at the start of Detained: A Writer’s Prison Diary (1981), where he hails Wariinga, a central character in Devil on the Cross (1982), as his inspiration, his ‘heroine of toil’, he tends, in his more recent work in particular, to set up his women characters

in Stories of women
Open Access (free)
Tania Anne Woloshyn

Ultra-violet radiation puts up the general resistance of the body to disease, and promotes good health and sexual power of citizens who by sedentary indoor lives during the winter have become depressed and out of condition […] Marasmic and delicate children may be made better, and mothers who cannot nurse their babies may be made

in Soaking up the rays