Search results

You are looking at 11 - 20 of 48 items for :

  • Manchester Security, Conflict & Peace x
Clear All
Civilisation, civil society and the Kosovo war
Mikkel Vedby Rasmussen

division of labour, shapes both domestic and international order. The division of labour, he argued, was a prerequisite to an organic society that allowed social institutions independent of the state. In their turn, these institutions would produce a truly free society, whose organic nature was believed to encourage creativity and progress. 4 Ferguson’s work, therefore, implied a clear link between the

in Mapping European security after Kosovo
Open Access (free)
Redefining security in the Middle East
Tami Amanda Jacoby and Brent E. Sasley

involved a broad range of issues with respect to the state and its function as a protection system and a collective identity structure, and has raised questions of an epistemological and ontological nature, as well as other levels of analysis between the local and the global. By challenging the unified, abstract and ethnocentric bias of mainstream security studies and its realist–neorealist paradigm, critical

in Redefining security in the Middle East
A veiled threat
Thomas J. Butko

ineffectual rule of the PLO. In the current environment, Hamas ’ alternative nature is most clearly demonstrated by its rejection of the Oslo process and its embodiment as its principal opponent. In terms of support, Hamas continues to garner most of its popular backing when the peace process stalls and is perceived as providing most Palestinians with few, if any, tangible benefits. This pattern can be

in Redefining security in the Middle East
Open Access (free)
Kosovo and the outlines of Europe’s new order
Sergei Medvedev and Peter van Ham

framework into the critical philosophical camp’. 4 Most contributors to this book have adopted such a critical approach by re-essentialising and deconstructing orthodox assumptions about the nature of European (and global) security without, however, necessarily offering their own redefinitions. The political and intellectual insecurity brought about by ‘Kosovo’ has much to do with a rising culture of virtuality to which most

in Mapping European security after Kosovo
Tami Amanda Jacoby

exclusive when the social context of warfare is considered. In short, a consideration of gender renders ambiguous many of the common assumptions held about male–female domains in war, as well as the nature and effectiveness of protection systems (i.e. security). This has significant implications for redefining security from the perspective of feminist debates and concepts. The Middle East is a valuable

in Redefining security in the Middle East
Open Access (free)
Paul Latawski and Martin A. Smith

as a key reason for this approach. As one British commentator put it, ‘the frustrations of American commanders with the cumbersome (and, at times, leaky) nature of Nato’s collective decision-making during the Kosovo conflict [have] made them wary of too much military involvement now by other countries’. 4 Another argued that, after Kosovo, ‘it is unlikely that they [the Americans] will ever again wish to use NATO to manage

in The Kosovo crisis and the evolution of post-Cold War European security
The analytical framework
Eşref Aksu

, it is not adequately applied to the analysis of past change. Rather it is heavily complemented, indeed occasionally substituted, by a semi-constructivist ‘learning’ approach, revolving around the UN’s ‘reflexive (non-purposive) adaptation’ and ‘planned (purposive) change’ in response to pressures. 10 In other words, the nature of power configurations and of change is not adequately

in The United Nations, intra-state peacekeeping and normative change
Lessons for critical security studies?
Emmanuel-Pierre Guittet

stopped does not pre-empt the possibility of examining the embodied nature and experience of different modes of travel, or of being a traveller in different places: ‘[t]‌he very idea of movement implies both a sociological imagination for spatial matters and a geographic sensitivity to understanding social and cultural processes of movement’ (Vannini 2010 : 112). It is otiose

in Security/ Mobility
Open Access (free)
Paul Latawski and Martin A. Smith

Slobodan Milosevic in the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (FRY) to cease and desist from what the former considered to be unacceptable activities in Kosovo province. Further, the FRY was also compelled effectively to cede authority over Kosovo to an international protectorate. NATO thus sits at the nexus of a number of important debates. Perhaps the most controversial concern the nature of its intervention and the circumstances in

in The Kosovo crisis and the evolution of post-Cold War European security
Brent E. Sasley

only threats that concerned American interests (i.e. military threats from the Soviet Union) were considered security threats. 1 In the contemporary international system, however, issues of security are now much more than superpower competition and interests, and these raise questions as to the nature and practice of security ( Dalby, 1997 : 4). As Brian Job notes, ‘it is increasingly taken for

in Redefining security in the Middle East