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Time and space
Saurabh Dube

. Such readings could problematize the very nature of the historical archive as well as initiate conversations with other orientations, including those of structural linguistics and critical theory. 1 No less salient were incipient acknowledgments of the innately political character of history writing. In this wider scenario, attending the history (honors) undergraduate program

in Subjects of modernity
Rousseau as a constitutionalist
Mads Qvortrup

) The same view was more famously developed by John Locke, in his Second Treatise of Government. For Locke, the king, while bound by natural law, could only perform his executive power subject to the consent of the people (represented in Parliament). Rejecting Filmer’s view, Locke noted that ‘he that thinks that absolute power purifies mens’ blood, and corrects the baseness of human nature, need read but the history of this, or any other Chap003.p65 55 11/09/03, 13:34 56 The political philosophy of Rousseau age, to be convinced of the contrary’ (Locke 1988: 327

in The political philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau
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Antinomies and enticements
Saurabh Dube

: the progressive control of nature through scientific procedures of technology and the inexorable demystification of enchantments through powerful techniques of reason. Indeed, it is possible to argue – along with Martin Heidegger, for example – that the privileged dispensation of legislative reason within regimes of modernity gathers together nature and humanity as conjoint attributes of a disenchanted world

in Subjects of modernity
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An epilogue
Saurabh Dube

-garde) modern, exploring the critical contours of a (contending, “primitivist”) modern, rethinking the content of tradition, and debating the nature of modernity. Imbued with specific spatial densities and tousled temporal energies, this has provided South Asian modernisms with their own twist, with discrete textures. We have discussed that a key characteristic of modernism at large has been to emphasize the

in Subjects of modernity
David Owen

it also changes the legal position of UK citizens living outside of the EU. Even if we set this issue of legal status aside though, it fundamentally concerns the nature of the political association to which citizens belong and the terms on which they relate to one another and to others. This second point is clearly made by the second example, the 2004 Irish referendum on whether to abolish their unconditional ius soli rule in respect of citizenship

in Democratic inclusion
Peter J. Spiro

that citizenship's in/out form has difficulty processing. Citizenship law is no longer well equipped to sort inauthentic claims from authentic ones. The scalar nature of attachment also challenges citizenship's equality condition. To adapt to variable levels of membership, citizenship might have to abandon equality. But it is not clear what remains of citizenship without equality, since equality is located at its ideological core. The spaces we inhabit do not have

in Democratic inclusion
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A pluralist theory of citizenship
Rainer Bauböck

themselves are an obstacle rather than an enabling condition for democracy and peaceful relations between polities. The territorial nature and borders of comprehensive jurisdictions provide a political-institutional background context for democracy. Yet there is also a closely related social condition that we need to spell out before we can address democratic inclusion problems. This is the assumption that territorial borders

in Democratic inclusion
Some questions for Rainer Bauböck
Joseph H. Carens

“exclude the vision of a self-governing global demos” (p. 12). I must say that I am somewhat perplexed as to the nature of the argument against global democracy. Is Bauböck making a conceptual claim, a normative claim, an empirical claim or perhaps some combination of all three? Does he think that the idea of a self-governing global demos is conceptually incoherent? Or is he saying instead that a self-governing global demos would be a bad

in Democratic inclusion
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Entanglements and ambiguities
Saurabh Dube

influential scholarship and the clearly palpable nature of human action in social worlds. At the same, the late 1960s and the 1970s also saw the immense success in sociology and anthropology of explanatory frameworks according precedence to the unfolding of structures and systems in understandings of history and society. This was the case with “world systems” and “dependency” theories that projected the

in Subjects of modernity
David Miller

issues? This position has been defended by Arash Abizadeh especially, though the claim about the coercive nature of immigration law has been widely accepted (Abizadeh 2008 ). 7 I have subjected it to critique elsewhere (Miller 2010; 2016 : ch. 4). In brief, I suggest (a) that not all coercive interventions give rise to democratic rights (see note 6 above); and (b) in the case of immigration policy, it is important to distinguish between the policy itself being

in Democratic inclusion