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James Thompson

outlined below. However, it was the proximity I had to the relationship of care between the professional physiotherapist and her patient that was the primary spur to the argument that is sketched here. Antoine required at first daily exercise on the joints in his shoulder, elbow, wrist and individual fingers. This was extraordinarily painful and needed a clarity of purpose, mutual respect, intimacy and quality of touch that I found breath-taking. The relationship that developed and the tireless, joint-by-joint work was intense and demanded a kind of eyeball

in Performing care
Open Access (free)
An introduction
John J. Joughin and Simon Malpas

been penned by philosophers, while much of the work currently described as ‘continental philosophy’ now emerges from departments of literature. But the reader’s comments also serve to remind us of the extent to which the dialogue which already exists between these two subjects now needs to be made still more explicit. There are, after all, tensions to be plotted here, as well as affinities. In this respect of course there are other more tangible reasons why the anonymous reader’s distinction between literature and philosophy seems a less than helpful one. Maybe the

in The new aestheticism
Open Access (free)
Gill Rye and Michael Worton

self is also clearly manifest and, indeed, foregrounded in the work of a significant number of the contemporary French women writers discussed in this volume. The authorial self as narrator or protagonist is subject to the same tensions and negotiations as other aspects of the self – above all, in relation to her readers. Sophie Calle’s experiments with her/self both challenge and implicate the reader in an ethical relation to the text, in which respect for the other and the self is precisely at stake. In Detambel’s L’Ecrivaillon, the writing self is embodied, only to

in Women’s writing in contemporary France
Open Access (free)
Peter Morey

elsewhere. Like the travelling journeyman of the Middle Ages, referred to by Walter Benjamin, bringing back tales of far-flung places, Mistry’s work as a whole, with its repeated image of journeys of various kinds, combines ‘the lore of faraway places, such as a much-traveled man brings home, with the lore of the past, as it best reveals itself to natives of a place’.1 Rohinton Mistry was born into the Parsi community of Bombay on 3 July 1952. He was the second of four children, three boys and a girl. (His younger brother, Cyrus, went on to be a respected playwright in

in Rohinton Mistry
Open Access (free)
The adolescent girl and the nation
Elleke Boehmer

child within the family as embodying an exploited, unformed potential that signifies the colonised also. From its opening pages the novel unfolds a disturbing family drama in which the eldest daughter Louie, the focaliser, seesaws between her allegiance to her father Sam Pollit, based on her respect for his knowledge and authority, and her attachment to her abjected stepmother Henny, founded on the gender loyalty. Accompanying this unsteadiness, the novel’s underlying national identifications are subtly split – divided between, on the one hand, the United States with

in Stories of women
Open Access (free)
Aesthetics, fragmentation and community
Simon Malpas

– it always has the potential to signify more than can be summed up in a single reading or analysis – and yet it remains indissociable from, and opens questions about, the social space within which it appears. In this respect, Adorno’s formulation of art’s problematic autonomy helpfully captures the disruptive relations obtaining between art, the empirical world and historical specificity: art, he argues, ‘harbours what is empirically existing in its own substance. . . . Even the most sublime artwork takes up a determinate attitude to empirical reality by stepping

in The new aestheticism
Open Access (free)
Gender and a new politics in Achebe
Elleke Boehmer

shift indeed represents a thoroughgoing revision of ideas of power and leadership – in Ikem’s terms, a ‘new radicalism’ – or whether it remains in the main emblematic. Is it rather a public enshrining of a canonised and perhaps stereotyped ‘womanly’ authority set up as a last resort in the face of a depraved political situation? Even with respect to a seemingly radical revision, the female gender in Achebe may continue to be a vehicle: woman is the ground of change or discursive displacement but not the subject of transformation. To determine to what extent this might

in Stories of women
Johnnie Gratton

for every photograph, being a condition at once imposed (by the rectangular edges of the shot when first taken, edges themselves dictated by the format of the film in the camera) and assumed, changed into something chosen (by framing, trimming, cropping, etc.). In this respect, Calle may well be a postmodernist, but in her work thus far she has remained steadfastly pre-digital, an artist who likes to play with evidentiality rather than virtuality or computer-manipulated imagery. As something ‘set up’ or staged, the project–situation is artificial, a quality reflected in

in Women’s writing in contemporary France
The paradoxes of sustainability and Michel Houellebecq’s The Possibility of an Island
Hannes Bergthaller

nature would yield a commensurate increase of human autonomy. The more we learn about the natural world, the greater the margin of freedom we enjoy in constructing a human world where the dignity of the individual can find respect. Neo-Malthusianism confounded this logic: in applying the principles of scientific naturalism to the human species itself, it had arrived at an account of the latter according to which scientific truth now demanded the curbing of emancipatory aspirations and a relinquishment of individual autonomy. The Brundtland Report (and the discourse of

in Literature and sustainability
Open Access (free)
Towards a contemporary aesthetic
Jonathan Dollimore

’s civilisation’.13 For Hesse and numerous others in earlier generations, the humanist aesthetic was a liberating expression of profoundly civilising sympathies. For Moser in 2000 humanism remains just that. I respect Hesse writing in 1917; I can’t but see Moser, writing in 2000, as deeply complacent. Far from being liberating, the humanist aesthetic has become a way of standing still amidst the obsolete, complacent and self-serving clichés of the heritage culture industry and the arts establishment. It’s like an edifice which stands still, but on rotten foundations, propped up

in The new aestheticism