Open Access (free)
Eric Pudney

Edward refers to ‘Dreams, meer Dreams of Witches’ (i.350; cf. The Late Lancashire Witches l. 286). Doubty, on the other hand, is not similar in character or function to Doughty in Heywood and Brome’s play, apart from his name. The changed spelling of the name, however, does seem significant, hinting at the scepticism of the play towards witchcraft. This use of scepticism, I argue, is closely tied to the play’s politics. But while The Lancashire Witches raises serious doubts about the possibility of witchcraft, it ultimately employs this scepticism to encourage

in Scepticism and belief in English witchcraft drama, 1538–1681
Hannah Jones, Yasmin Gunaratnam, Gargi Bhattacharyya, William Davies, Sukhwant Dhaliwal, Emma Jackson, and Roiyah Saltus

in favour of emotional appeals to reassurance and fear (see Chapter 3 ), the Home Office has met with further scepticism. In what follows, we explore these different experiences and viewpoints, focusing on the ways in which the theatricalised performances of the state emerged in the particular moment of border control materialised by Operation Vaken. Through our research we have been able to delve into the effects of the state performance

in Go home?
Eric Pudney

), 343–56 (p. 343). 7 Notestein, p. 297. 246 Scepticism and belief in English witchcraft drama Saducismus Triumphatus takes exception to the views on spirit of materialists such as Thomas Hobbes; ‘nullibists’ like Descartes (whose definition of spirit, according to More, is tantamount to declaring its non-existence); ‘Holenmerians’ (for similar reasons); followers of Spinoza; and ‘psychopyrists’ like Thomas Willis, a founding member of the Royal Society (of which More was also a fellow) who regarded the soul as a kind of flame.8 While More treats his colleague

in Scepticism and belief in English witchcraft drama, 1538–1681
Open Access (free)
A never-ending story of mutual attraction and estrangement
Nikos Frangakis and Antonios D. Papayannides

early years of Euroscepticism. Foreign policy considerations and the social impact of the protracted stabilisation policies needed to open the way to Euro participation are the main sources of elite scepticism. The press and electronic media provide mainly pro-European coverage. Greek participation in the third stage of EMU in 2001 was generally touted as the paramount policy objective. Constitutional changes and political adaptations to accommodate the EU legal system The ratification of the Treaty of Accession of Greece to the (then) European Communities was based

in Fifteen into one?
Open Access (free)
In pursuit of influence and legitimacy
Finn Laursen

integration of the Schengen acquis into the Union by the Amsterdam Treaty is also creating pressures on the JHA exemption, and the new British attitude to a common European defence policy has placed pressure on the Danish policy on European defence. The Conservative Party is also pro-integration, but less so than the Liberal Party. It is the smaller parties on both the left and the right that have tried to exploit the public’s scepticism by advocating anti-integration policies. These smaller parties have sometimes been very successful in setting the agenda of the Danish EU

in Fifteen into one?
The past, present and future of the English Defence League
Hilary Pilkington

, most talked rationally about their ‘respect’ for him, in particular for the fact that he ‘knows his stuff’ and that he had carried on despite the pressures on him and his family that accompany the leadership role. At the same time, neither leader was beyond criticism. There was scepticism about some of the stories of hardship and persecution endured by the leaders (Ian, Tim) and one respondent felt Tommy was ‘way over his head’ with his ambitions to move into politics (Michelle). Thus, when the movement was effectively functioning without either of its leaders in

in Loud and proud
Adaptive trials for intractable cancers
Anne Kerr, Choon Key Chekar, Emily Ross, Julia Swallow, and Sarah Cunningham-Burley

NICE give their guidance. We also encountered considerable scepticism and concerns about the trial when we engaged with lung cancer practitioners involved in recruitment. This was linked to a general sense of the difficulties of working with very unwell patients, difficulties with implementation and a vague sense of beleaguerment with the bioeconomy of which the NHS is a part. As another consultant noted: I think

in Personalised cancer medicine
Alcohol health education campaigns in England
Alex Mold

local health education campaigns, an expert committee report on alcohol prevention and a public consultation exercise on alcohol, the chapter highlights tensions between different approaches to dealing with drink. Health education efforts were intended to encourage individuals to moderate their alcohol consumption: to behave responsibly by becoming ‘sensible drinkers’. Yet, at the same time, considerable scepticism was expressed (even by those involved in the campaigns) about the ability of health education to change behaviour. Other approaches, such as increasing the

in Balancing the self
Open Access (free)
The oddity of democracy
Rodney Barker

The unique ambivalence of democracy as a form of government and politics is the identity of the mobilised population as both rulers and subjects. Democracy depends not only on good government or good governors, but on the political role of a demos of active citizens. A democratic polity requires a democratic society, characterised by equality of identity in all its dimensions. The ideal identity of a democratic citizenry is composed of polite but limited deference, and robust scepticism of authority.

The possibility of disrespect and satire is both least necessary and most possible in democratic societies, with demonstration and, in its widest form, carnival as the last resort for asserting democratic identity.

The collision between equality and inequality, association and distinction can be vigorous in democracies, as representation not only exemplifies but exaggerates identities cultivated through association.

in Cultivating political and public identity
Open Access (free)
Eric Pudney

4 The Witch of Edmonton Thomas Dekker, John Ford, and William Rowley’s The Witch of Edmonton (1621) departs from the conventions established in previous witchcraft drama in relation to the depiction of scepticism. Macbeth and Dr Faustus depicted the scepticism and credulity of witches, using the discourse of demonology to illustrate the psychology of witch and devil’s servant – a psychology which is characterised by both inappropriate and excessive credulity (towards the devil) and inappropriate and excessive scepticism (towards God). While the delusions of the

in Scepticism and belief in English witchcraft drama, 1538–1681