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The International Arbitration and Peace Association
Heloise Brown

which to limit war was to re-educate the public so that they would not vote for war or for inflexible, combative politicians. She employed feminist arguments of sexual difference in her contention that the infringement of human rights was inherent in the use of physical force: ‘We have to fight for and protect the interests of the weak, by teaching the strong that they have no rights by virtue of their strength.’ This, she said, was ‘a work in which women can assist. I cannot but feel that we have the right to appeal . . . in this matter.’27 Her arguments, as these

in ‘The truest form of patriotism’
Clotilde Escalle’s tales of transgression
Michael Worton

sexuality that is abusive for their own internal reasons. The feminist philosopher, Linda LeMoncheck, argues that sexuality should not be divided into ‘good’ and ‘bad’ or ‘normal’ and ‘perverse’, but should be rethought as ‘a differentiated category of nonstigmatized sexual variation’.15 She further argues that from such a perspective: both normal and perverse sex become forms of sexual difference. Within this framework, no sexual preference is advantaged by being ‘normal’ . . . understanding both the normal and the perverse as two types of sexual difference from the ‘view

in Women’s writing in contemporary France
Open Access (free)
Between Adorno and Heidegger
Joanna Hodge

different resonances of a thinking of family resemblance and of sexual difference on the one hand, as philosophically domesticated notions, and of racial difference and blood ties, as politically supersensitive.

in The new aestheticism
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Behind the screen
Chloe Porter

eroticisation of the central female character is founded on her disruption of signs of sexual difference. Significantly, the epilogue depicts audience members as complicit in the production of Moll’s image, as it is suggested that Moll will reappear onstage ‘some days hence’, and that Moll will ‘woo’ the audience by requesting the ‘sign’ of their ‘hands’ in order to ‘beckon her’ to them

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Open Access (free)
Elleke Boehmer

rereminds postcolonial theory of the significance of the nation, as I will explain. For another, it persuasively introduces (and reintroduces) the constitutive reality of sexual difference to a critical practice that has till very recently, unless in passing, tended to overlook this formative legacy. In mainstream postcolonial studies, gender is still conventionally treated in a tokenistic way, or as subsidiary to the category of race. These two impacts correspond to the two major ironies or blind-spots of postcolonial theory which continue even today to compete for centre

in Stories of women
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Crossing the margins
Glenda Norquay and Gerry Smyth

Scottish strategies; a discussion of the complicated dynamic of woman and nation by Aileen Christianson, which explores the work of twentieth-century Scottish and Irish women writers and assesses the relevance of a postcolonial context in understanding the ‘debatable’ boundaries arising from that intersection; an exploration of masculinities in both English and Scottish writing from Berthold Schoene, which also deploys sexual difference as a means of testing postcolonial theorising, but does so within the context of a discourse in which bodily, social and national

in Across the margins
Open Access (free)
Anne McClintock and H. Rider Haggard
Laura Chrisman

sexual difference and reproduction are chapter2 21/12/04 11:09 am Page 48 48 Imperialism natural processes, and it is here, through Haggard’s twin concerns with capitalist reification and wealth accumulation, that I would begin to analyse the interrelation of reproductive and economic power. Along with the reintroduction of the notion of the totality in feminist postcolonial criticism, I want to argue for the reintroduction of the notion of mediation. The notion of the totality allows us to engage at a macrological level with the structures through which

in Postcolonial contraventions
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British masculinities, pomophobia, and the post-nation
Berthold Schoene

hence with femininity. It means, in other words, the collapse of that system of fortification whereby sexual difference is secured, a system dependent upon projection, disavowal and fetishism. (3) The question to be asked now is whether contemporary Scottish masculinity could possibly be described as a devolutionary kind of masculinity that has embraced its feminine marginality and is saying ‘no’ to power. In ‘Not(e) from the margin’, an essay written in 1995 in response to an English woman colleague’s suggestion that ‘nationalism is always bad news for women

in Across the margins
Open Access (free)
Trauma, dream and narrative
Victoria Best

. For a more detailed reading of this, see Lambrichs: trauma, dream and narrative  Joseph Weiss, ‘Dreams and their various purposes’, in Essential Papers on Dreams, pp. –.  Trevor Pateman, ‘How to do things in dreams’, in Laura Marcus (ed.), Sigmund Freud’s The Interpretation of Dreams: New Interdisciplinary Essays (Manchester: Manchester University Press, ), pp. – (p. ).  James L. Fosshage, ‘The psychological function of dreams’, in Essential Papers on Dreams, pp. – (p. ).  Shoshana Felman, What Does a Woman Want? Reading and Sexual

in Women’s writing in contemporary France
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Colonial body into postcolonial narrative
Elleke Boehmer

Rajeswari Sunder Rajan’s reading, see Real and Imagined Women: Gender, Culture and Postcolonialism (London and New York: Routledge, 1993), pp. 15–39. Jacobus, Reading Woman, p. 217. Luce Irigaray, ‘Sexual difference,’ in Toril Moi (ed.), French Feminist Thought (Oxford: Blackwell, 1988), p. 120. Nuruddin Farah, Maps (London: Picador, 1986). Jean Franco, ‘The nation as imagined community’, in H. Aram Veeser (ed.), The New Historicism (London: Routledge, 1989), p. 205. On the second, cynical, ‘postnativist’ stage in African writing, see Kwame Anthony Appiah, ‘Is the post- in

in Stories of women