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witchcraft continued
Willem de Blécourt and Owen Davies

The study of witchcraft accusations in Europe during the period after the end of the witch trials is still in its infancy. The present volume, together with its companion Beyond the witch trials , intends to develop the field further by presenting a plethora of studies from across Europe and, most importantly, to inspire new research. Whereas Beyond the witch trials focused on the period of the

in Witchcraft Continued
Marie Lennersand and Linda Oja

4 Beyond the witch trials Responses to witchcraft in Sweden Responses to witchcraft in late seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Sweden The aftermath of the witch-hunt in Dalarna Marie Lennersand The witch-hunts of the early modern period must have left a profound mark on many local communities. The intense trials and executions which took place during the second half of the seventeenth century were dreadful events that touched many people. All those involved, from the accused and the witnesses to the judges and the clergy, had to make decisions that changed

in Beyond the witch trials
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A male strategy
Soili-Maria Olli

6 Beyond the witch trials The Devil’s pact The Devil’s pact: a male strategy Soili-Maria Olli By the second half of the seventeenth century, as the witch trials reached their climax in Sweden, belief in the interventionist powers of the Devil had become not only a major preoccupation of the educated classes, but also seems to have considerably exercised the minds of the wider population, illiterate as well as literate. It is apparent, however, that different groups in society held different views as to the nature and consequences of dealing with the Devil

in Beyond the witch trials
Sabine Doering-Manteuffel and Stephan Bachter

10 Beyond the witch trials The dissemination of magical knowledge The dissemination of magical knowledge in Enlightenment Germany The supernatural and the development of print culture Sabine Doering-Manteuffel The so-called Age of Enlightenment has traditionally been portrayed as a phase of European history during which new philosophies came into existence concerning people’s ability to determine their own fate through reason. This era saw the development of future-oriented conceptions of state and society as well as new ideas about mankind’s ability to

in Beyond the witch trials
Magic, witchcraft and Church in early eighteenth-century Capua
Augusto Ferraiuolo

2 Beyond the witch trials Magic, witchcraft and Church in Capua Pro exoneratione sua propria coscientia: magic, witchcraft and Church in early eighteenth-century Capua Augusto Ferraiuolo The following discussion is concerned with accusations of magic, which were formalised as denunciations heard by the Inquisition of the Archdiocese of Capua, a city twelve miles north of Naples, during the first half of the eighteenth century. What the following discussion will not be doing is providing a detailed socio-cultural exploration of the magical practices and the

in Beyond the witch trials
Peter Maxwell-Stuart

5 Beyond the witch trials Witchcraft and magic in Scotland Witchcraft and magic in eighteenth-century Scotland Peter Maxwell-Stuart On 20 October 1711 Defoe published in the periodical Review his well-known and unambiguous opinion on the subject of witches: There are, and ever have been such People in the World, who converse Familiarly with the Devil, enter into Compact with him, and receive Power from him, both to hurt and deceive, and these have been in all Ages call’d Witches, and it is these, that our Law and God’s Law Condemn’s as such; and I think there

in Beyond the witch trials
The discourse of spirits in Enlightenment Bristol
Jonathan Barry

7 Beyond the witch trials Public infidelity and private belief? Public infidelity and private belief ? The discourse of spirits in Enlightenment Bristol Jonathan Barry Recent work on the history of witchcraft and magic has identified three themes or approaches as of particular importance in our understanding of a subject which, although it has been centre stage since the publication of Religion and the Decline of Magic in 1971, has continued to trouble historians. The first problem, acknowledged as ‘the most baffling aspect of this difficult subject’ by Thomas

in Beyond the witch trials
Feijoo versus the ‘falsely possessed’ in eighteenth-century Spain
María Tausiet

3 Beyond the witch trials From illusion to disenchantment From illusion to disenchantment: Feijoo versus the ‘falsely possessed’ in eighteenth-century Spain 1 María Tausiet I conclude from the findings that there were no witches nor bedevilled people in those places until they began to write about them. (Alonso de Salazar y Frías) 2 I prove the matter through the constant experience that on very rare occasions does there appear to be any possessed person in places where no one starts exorcizing. (Benito Jerónimo Feijoo) 3 Among the many attacks that the

in Beyond the witch trials
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A late eighteenth-century Dutch witch doctor and his clients
Willem de Blécourt

8 Beyond the witch trials ‘Evil people’ ‘Evil people’: a late eighteenth-century Dutch witch doctor and his clients Willem de Blécourt As a part of the increasing interest in ‘popular’ culture, historians have become more conscious of the presence of witchcraft after the witch trials. Most of the time their attention, however, is restricted to simply indicating witchcraft occurrences. For newcomers in the field a methodological trap also looms. The name of that trap is ‘superstition’ and its character is an often undeclared but determining element in the

in Beyond the witch trials
Gender and contemporary fantasies of witchcraft
Alison Rowlands

witchcraft.3 Most were married at the time of involvement in a trial: the remainder were predominantly widows.4 Why were adult women most likely to become caught up in witch-trials in early modern Rothenburg? Was it because they were most readily imagined as witches by their neighbours and accused accordingly? Or was the gender-bias more marked at the elite level, ensuring that any men who were accused as witches were less likely to face formal prosecution? This chapter explores answers to these questions through analysis of a series of seventeenth-century cases and in the

in Witchcraft narratives in Germany