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Campaigns and causes

employment or to family break-ups which occurred after the grant had been assessed for the academical year, chap 5 23/9/03 100 1:16 pm Page 100 The 1970s rather than to parental indifference or bloody-mindedness; the administrative process of adjusting the grant to changed circumstances could be very slow indeed. One weapon in student hands was the rent strike, aimed immediately against the University, as the landlord of some 40 per cent of students. The objects of such action were both to force the University to reduce rents and hall fees and to persuade it to urge

in A history of the University of Manchester 1973–90
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was the wider reaction his reports prompted. Although additionally dismissed as the ‘extravagant estimate’ of a ‘superficial observer’ by American Catholic commentators, Shinnors’ figure of ten million lapsed emigrants found credulous ears among those whose anti-Catholic or anti-clerical arguments it appeared to buttress.4 The Irish anti-clerical polemicist Michael McCarthy accepted not only that ‘Irish immigrants in America desert in millions’ but that they were far better off for doing so, while the former priest (and one of G. K. Chesterton’s Heretics), Joseph

in Population, providence and empire

the nature of the modernist quest: in modernist novels, characters are not presented ‘whole’, but ‘in the fragmentary way in which people appear’.17 Ford really means another kind of novel, a post-railway-age novel, one that, though modern and realistic, perhaps overall need not be fragmentary. In modern times, Ford-the-catastrophist asserts in The English Novel: From the Earliest Days to the Death of Joseph Conrad, humanity has ‘scrapped a whole culture; the Greek anthology and Tibullus and Catullus have gone the way of the earliest locomotive and the first Tin

in Fragmenting modernism

humanitarian intervention he notes that ‘this may happen, but I think that it is not desirable, for the slope will be slippery’. 68 In the period 1880–90, those supporting humanitarian intervention include the British William Edward Hall and James Lorimer, 69 the French diplomat Édouard Engelhardt, 70 the Swiss Joseph Hornung 71 and the Greek Michel Kebedgy, of the University of Berne. 72 Hall at the start of the 1880s was circumspect in his widely read treatise

in Humanitarian intervention in the long nineteenth century

subjective fades to black to suggest the ‘dying of the light’ as a mortally injured Ian Bannen tries unavailingly to attend to what a policeman is saying to him. In Charles Crichton’s Dance Hall (1950), the crosscutting between dance hall and train station as the heroine (Natasha Parry) is taken almost to the point of suicide eloquently forges a connection between the deceptive illusions of the former setting (‘You’re Only

in British cinema of the 1950s
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their knowledge and understanding of Afro-Caribbeanness, global cultural flows and racial communities (Joseph, 2011b ). They can also stay home in Canada and the past and their culture can “come alive” at the local cricket grounds, banquet halls and community events they attend, often with visitors from across the Black Atlantic. As Walcott notes, “any useful discussion of Afro-Caribbean popular culture

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
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dem days, but still, I could lash! Stuart Hall provides astute advice concerning the cultural practices of filmmaking in the Afro-Caribbean diaspora: rather than “thinking of identity as an already accomplished fact, which the new cultural practices then represent, we should think, instead, of identity as a

in Sport in the Black Atlantic

students’ unions in general were being treated like ‘church hall youth clubs’, the University showed no signs of reverting to the paternalism of the 1960s and again concerning itself with such matters as the libellous contents of the Union newspaper or the immoral presence of contraceptive dispensers in the Union building. Union finance did not in practice present the serious problems which pessimists had foreseen, and, despite the cuts, the Union did not approach insolvency, as it had done in the 1970s. Much was due to the wise counsel of the Union manager, Vic Silcock

in A history of the University of Manchester 1973–90
The Actresses’ Franchise League from 1914 to 1928

provided entertainments at the United Suffragists’ Christmas Sale in December 1914,2 was represented among other suffrage societies at a Women and Army Work Exhibition held in Caxton Hall in May 1915,3 and had a stall at the United Suffragists’ Woman’s Christmas Sale ‘Very much alive and kicking’ ­119 in Central Hall, Westminster in November 1915.4 The AFL also joined established theatrical charities such as the Theatrical Ladies’ Guild and the Actors’ Benevolent Fund in financially supporting theatre performers and workers suffering wartime hardship, administering

in Stage women, 1900–50
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consider Spenser’s use of allegorical satire and allegory as satire in Daphnaïda, analyzing the ways that Spenser signals readers to interpret the poem satirically through playful use of allegory and metaphor. With Chapter 3, I move the discussion from Spenser to a wider circle of influence, starting with two somewhat reductive views from contemporaries of what Spenser “meant” in the literary system of the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. Two friends, Joseph Hall and William Bedell, wrote works that suggest an image of Spenser as an uncomplicated

in Spenserian satire