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post-​9/​ 11 change was proving terribly difficult to do. By the time that the Untold History project began to form as an idea in late 2007, the 201 Th e ci nem a of Ol iver   S to ne 202 fact that the media had so little to say about the condition of the USA galvanised Stone to press on with a series underwritten by the idea that the pursuit of empire was an economic project for the USA as much as it was a political one, and that American corporate interests were invariably the (major) beneficiaries of whatever intervention the government had initiated in the

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Yale’s Chronicles of America

(1919), The Right to Happiness (1919), The Undercurrent (1919) and Dangerous Hours (1920). In many of these films, the generic ‘Red’ or ‘radical’ villains fomented worker unrest that led to strikes and riots. The armed intervention of the heroic US military suppressed the dangerous and violent mobs that threatened the very fabric of the Republic. 24 The cycle of

in Memory and popular film
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Civil rites of passage

’ timidity and sentimentality in white redemption stories set in the ‘bad old days’, or our primal thrill at seeing morally-charged action heroes succeed against evil racists by deploying the requisite quotient of violence. Herring and Robinson’s low-budget creative intervention in the wake of A Time To Kill shows that bitter memories of the 1960s continue to simmer just below

in Memory and popular film
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pissed off with Valenti. I stayed out of the debate as best as possible, but there is no doubt that Valenti’s intervention hurt the film with respect to the Oscars. I met Valenti some years later and made up with him. He was a likeable man, however his position was that when it comes to Johnson, you don’t tread there. I think that Valenti’s opinion was to some extent shared by some of the other studio heads, who anonymously expressed the view that Warners had acted irresponsibly.4 Warners took a lot of heat over JFK. The combination of that pressure, with the limited

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
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stopping the transmission of the film, and making an editorial intervention that required Stone to return to Cuba to gather more materials.48 All the while, diplomatic tensions between the USA and Cuba worsened throughout spring 2003. A round-​up of twenty dissidents on 18 March included several independent reporters who had attended a journalism workshop the previous week at the home of James Cason, the senior US diplomat in Havana.49 Two plane hijackings on 19 March and 1 April saw Cuban airliners diverted from Cuba to Key West in Florida; while on 12 April 2003, three

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Outdoor screens and public congregations

relationship with the ‘live’ and the ‘real’. Philip Auslander observes that the ‘live’ is a consequence of the mediated, rather than the reverse; prior to the development of recording technologies, there would have been no concept of the ‘live’ event, ‘for that category has meaning only in relation to an opposing possibility’. 33 Through its intervention, argue Dayan and Katz, television itself ‘becomes the

in The British monarchy on screen
Screening Victoria

keenly Victoria and Albert sought to prevent war with the Union during the Civil War. Lincoln is even shown praising their intervention in a scene The Times critic declared ‘evidently designed to appeal to American sentiment’. 36 By the late 1930s Hollywood studios wishing to exploit this transatlantic interest had also started to produce films with British subjects in Britain. The Prime Minister

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
Amateur film, civic culture and the rehearsal of monarchy

representation of the child as a more ghastly version of effigy was the (mostly unknown) filmmakers’ intent in picturing Guid Nychburris (or other festivals). Rather, it is an effect generated or amplified by the amateur quality of the filming (which features odd compositions, abrupt edits and poorly constructed narratives) along with the frequent lack of sound, the stilted nature of the performers and the uncontrolled intervention of

in The British monarchy on screen
A lost epic of the reign of Victoria

placed the “Armill” around the Sovereign’s neck’, the clouds parted and the sun shone through the glass roof, over-exposing the film stock. 16 In a concerted attempt to complete the scene, Barker instructed his staff to turn off the top lights, but for some reason the interior light still grew brighter. After a vigorous intervention by Barker, partly censored in Samuelson’s anecdote (‘“If you don’t switch those so-and-so lights

in The British monarchy on screen
Contemporary ‘British’ cinema and the nation’s monarchs

in relation to political affairs. By the time of The King’s Speech , the focus is almost resolutely on George VI’s private life, and his efforts to control his stammer; his interventions in the public sphere are primarily intended to voice the will of the Prime Minister and his cabinet, without question. This shift away from monarchs who both wield immense political power

in The British monarchy on screen