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Jürgen Habermas and the European left

international laws and its human rights. Habermas maintained that the normative effect of the ‘monstrous mass crimes of the twentieth century’ has been to acknowledge that ‘states as the subjects of international law forfeited the presumption of innocence that underlies the prohibition on intervention and immunity against criminal prosecution under international law’. 27 He did not reject the principles of classical international law – self-determination of peoples

in Antisemitism and the left

, yet seeks, nevertheless, to entrench the logic of capitalism. It is concluded that The Third Way should be understood not as crude sociology (although it is that) but as a sophisticated political intervention in support of the argument that ‘there is no alternative’ to all-out capitalism. The rhetorical structure of The Third Way The overt

in The Third Way and beyond

for the state in the economy and society. There is a strong belief in state intervention to improve social and economic conditions, a belief based on a very clear set of ideological assumptions that can be identified as being ‘centre-left’ or ‘social-democratic’ in their orientation. pragmatism An approach to decision-making that is focused on desirable outcomes to

in Understanding political ideas and movements
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’ wars can be conceived and fought ‘positively,’ just as ‘offensive’ wars (armed humanitarian intervention for example) can be conceived and fought ‘negatively’. In its ‘positive’ form just cause is understood in stark (even Manichaean) terms. A clear moral divide – a moral chasm – is seen to exist between potential or actual belligerents. The idea that adversaries inhabit the same moral universe – a key

in Political concepts

state intervention in this area is counterproductive. Far from being empowered, the subjects of this intervention are in fact made dependent on the state. A ‘dependency culture’ emerges in which the poor, ethnic minorities and other under-privileged citizens have their self-reliance undermined. They may eventually come to expect the local council or the state to do everything for them, with disastrous consequences for

in Understanding political ideas and movements
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A power perspective on Arctic governance

statement, policy concern or actor in the Arctic Council. We also explore what kind of interventions and persons fall outside the remit and how these exclusions are effected or maintained. This line of enquiry envisions global governance policy fields as social spaces with ‘place-​specific’ norms and ways of enforcing these norms (Wilson Rowe, 2015). Acknowledging that performances of power  –​including developing and enforcing norms –​have an inherently ‘local’ and setting-​ specific aspect is important to grounding broad statements about power in global governance. The

in Arctic governance

snapshot taken at the North Pole, Lavrov did not even attend the ministerial session held in Iqaluit during the Canadian chairmanship. Russia was instead represented by its Minister of Environment. Russia’s annexation of Crimea and continued interventions in eastern Ukraine in spring 2014 had triggered a sanctions regime by European and North American countries, and a war of words and non-​military The power politics of representation     41 reactions in many bilateral and multilateral settings (Legvold, 2016). Arctic military cooperation, for example the Chief Heads of

in Arctic governance
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– feathers and nests and foraging – and other dimensions of social action is symbiotic rather than causal, how is change explained? The answer is that the relation between the various dimensions of action is never entirely coherent, and that the search for coherence will involve adaptation of one dimension or another, so that the symbiosis is dynamic, and its tensions and incoherencies never fully resolved. All variables are both dependent and independent in this sense, and whilst a political intervention to change one dimension of identity may well lead to other changes

in Cultivating political and public identity

movements to greater economic and political power and the demands of war. As a consequence of the effectiveness of state intervention in staving off social revolution and prosecuting total war it was increasingly believed that the state could and should have a greater role in society to deal with social problems: want, poverty, unemployment, sickness, ignorance. The state was seen as a tool to achieve social justice, fairness and liberty by

in Understanding political ideas and movements
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greater wealth tend to give people a greater sense of practical freedom, and more choices in their lives than the poor enjoy. Freedom without some form of economic dimension is likely to remain merely theoretical, and will not survive if its opponents offer better economic rewards. The hungry and starving will readily give up theoretical freedoms if they can instead be fed. State intervention in economic

in Understanding political ideas and movements