Bonnie Evans

administrative systems also meant that very little was known about the occurrence of all forms of ‘mental handicap or behaviour disorders generally’. Furthermore, limited resources meant that priority was often given to what were ‘quantitatively more pressing developmental problems such as malnutrition, infectious diseases, blindness and deafness’. 15 These were strong findings of health

in The metamorphosis of autism
Open Access (free)
Lesbian citizenship and filmmaking in Sweden in the 1970s
Ingrid Ryberg

a company called Tjejfilm [‘Chick Film’] in Gothenburg. Both were funded by the state agency Socialstyrelsen [The National Board of Health and Welfare] and are the first cases of publicly funded films made by, with and about open lesbians in Sweden. Paradoxically, the same state agency was at this time also in charge of the official classification of homosexuality as a mental disorder (Socialstyrelsen, 1968). However, just a few years later the classification would be dropped and an official government report, ‘Utredningen om homosexuellas situation i samhället

in The power of vulnerability

This book was developed during a five-year research programme funded by the UK’s National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). This study aimed to improve service user and carer involvement in care planning in mental health services. The study was called Enhancing the Quality of User Involved Care Planning in Mental Health Services (EQUIP). Its aim is to help other public and patient representatives increase their understanding and skills in research methods. The EQUIP programme used a range of different research methods to achieve its goals, and you will read

in A research handbook for patient and public involvement researchers
Author: Sara De Vido

The book explores the relationship between violence against women on one hand, and the rights to health and reproductive health on the other. It argues that violation of the right to health is a consequence of violence, and that (state) health policies might be a cause of – or create the conditions for – violence against women. It significantly contributes to feminist and international human rights legal scholarship by conceptualising a new ground-breaking idea, violence against women’s health (VAWH), using the Hippocratic paradigm as the backbone of the analysis. The two dimensions of violence at the core of the book – the horizontal, ‘interpersonal’ dimension and the vertical ‘state policies’ dimension – are investigated through around 70 decisions of domestic, regional and international judicial or quasi-judicial bodies (the anamnesis). The concept of VAWH, drawn from the anamnesis, enriches the traditional concept of violence against women with a human rights-based approach to autonomy and a reflection on the pervasiveness of patterns of discrimination (diagnosis). VAWH as theorised in the book allows the reconceptualisation of states’ obligations in an innovative way, by identifying for both dimensions obligations of result, due diligence obligations, and obligations to progressively take steps (treatment). The book eventually asks whether it is not international law itself that is the ultimate cause of VAWH (prognosis).

An overview of the EQUIP study The EQUIP study aimed to improve service user and carer involvement in care planning in mental health services. We co-developed with service users and carers a training package for mental health professionals so that they would be better equipped to involve users and carers in their care. Service users and carers helped to design, shape and conduct the EQUIP study and you can learn more about their experiences in Chapter 1. During the EQUIP programme, we worked with service users and carers to develop a new instrument, a patient

in A research handbook for patient and public involvement researchers
Open Access (free)
The Algerian war and the ‘emancipation’ of Muslim women, 1954–62
Author: Neil Macmaster

In May 1958, and four years into the Algerian War of Independence, a revolt again appropriated the revolutionary and republican symbolism of the French Revolution by seizing power through a Committee of Public Safety. This book explores why a repressive colonial system that had for over a century maintained the material and intellectual backwardness of Algerian women now turned to an extensive programme of 'emancipation'. After a brief background sketch of the situation of Algerian women during the post-war decade, it discusses the various factors contributed to the emergence of the first significant women's organisations in the main urban centres. It was only after the outbreak of the rebellion in 1954 and the arrival of many hundreds of wives of army officers that the model of female interventionism became dramatically activated. The French military intervention in Algeria during 1954-1962 derived its force from the Orientalist current in European colonialism and also seemed to foreshadow the revival of global Islamophobia after 1979 and the eventual moves to 'liberate' Muslim societies by US-led neo-imperialism in Afghanistan and Iraq. For the women of Bordj Okhriss, as throughout Algeria, the French army represented a dangerous and powerful force associated with mass destruction, brutality and rape. The central contradiction facing the mobile socio-medical teams teams was how to gain the trust of Algerian women and to bring them social progress and emancipation when they themselves were part of an army that had destroyed their villages and driven them into refugee camps.

Matthew M. Heaton

their products treat and blurring the line between patient and market. 7 However, the pharmaceutical industry’s motivation for inserting itself into debates about mental health and illness is in many ways much more direct and its impact much more obvious than that of Elder Dempster. This chapter thus seeks to look ‘beyond the state’ by expanding upon the understanding of the indirect role that capitalist enterprises

in Beyond the state
Helen Brooks, Penny Bee and Anne Rogers

involvement be instilled • How in the care planning process? is the role and influence of individuals, teams and organisational • What factors in achieving high quality user-involved care planning? are carers’ experiences of the care planning process for people • What with severe mental illness? are professionals’ perceptions and experiences of delivering • What mental health care planning and involving service users and carers A Research Handbook for Patient and Public Involvement Researchers In relation to EQUIP, qualitative research methods were used to explore current

in A research handbook for patient and public involvement researchers
Open Access (free)
Neil McNaughton

being placed on local authority finances. This meant that community health services had to be reduced. The most notorious example was the so-called care in the community scheme. This policy closed down many of the mental hospitals which were dealing with patients who had long-term, low-level mental health problems. They were transferred into community hostels or even into private accommodation. This much cheaper solution saved money and, it was claimed, provided better conditions for the mentally ill. However, many mental health interest groups did not agree and many

in Understanding British and European political issues
Bonnie Evans

life In order to effect a major shift in the meaning of autism, there also had to be a major shift in the organisation of social life. Such a transformation began in 1959. This was the year in which the Mental Health Act was passed, which led to the closure of long-stay institutions for children. It was the Mental Health Act 1959 that set the scene for the gradual

in The metamorphosis of autism