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Elana Wilson Rowe

explores a systematising ‘snapshot’ approach, borrowed from science and technology studies, that may be fruitful in bringing problems of Arctic authority to light. In her cross-​country comparison of political debates around biotechnology in Germany, the United States and the United Kingdom, Sheila Jasanoff notes persistent differences in national ways of meeting some common questions posed by biotechnology debates, even in relatively similar western states. She asserts that norms of debate, modes of trust, and the roles of and expectations about experts and expertise

in Arctic governance
Open Access (free)
Dimitris N. Chryssochoou, Michael J. Tsinisizelis, Stelios Stavridis and Kostas Ifantis

passion for a united Europe, Beloff asserts, federalists were misguided in looking to the US pattern for a promising analogy.66 In Albertini’s words, ‘as a new form of the modern state, federalism is an American product. But the United States of America had not to overcome historically constituted nations to constitute itself.’67 In contrast, the federal conception of Europe failed to recognise that such a vision was not the primary goal for a sufficient number of Europeans. Likewise, its constitutive principles did not acquire sufficient persuasive power to win the

in Theory and reform in the European Union
Order and security in post-Cold War Europe
Dimitris N. Chryssochoou, Michael J. Tsinisizelis, Stelios Stavridis and Kostas Ifantis

whose traditional existence is indeed threatened by modernisation. The strength of 142 Theory and reform in the European Union the backlash reflects the severity of this threat. But time and resources are on the side of modernity, and I see no lack of a will to prevail in the United States today.51 European national visions, preferences and strategies In the framework already described, the process of systemic transformation lends new salience to the factors outlined in this chapter. In the first place, the notions of leadership and followership in EU–US relations

in Theory and reform in the European Union
Open Access (free)
Partial offsets and unfinished business
Dimitris N. Chryssochoou, Michael J. Tsinisizelis, Stelios Stavridis and Kostas Ifantis

political and constitutional future of a Union about to embark on further enlargements. Perhaps that was the reason behind the rather uncontroversial process of its ratification, at least as compared with the TEU, which allowed the Treaty to come into force on 1 May 1999. 68 Theory and reform in the European Union The IGC 1996/97 From the outset, the review conference was greeted with mixed feelings: some member states showed extreme caution, others thought it was too soon to engage themselves in a process of reforming Maastricht, while others were hesitant to disturb

in Theory and reform in the European Union
Open Access (free)
Kevin Harrison and Tony Boyd

interests. Then the psychological appeal of nationalism is examined, as is its impact on international politics, and on empires and multi-national states. Finally, we offer a critique of nationalism and some reflections on its possible future. POINTS TO CONSIDER Is nationalism anything more than extreme patriotism? How would you define a ‘nation’? Is nationalism an ideology of the left or the

in Understanding political ideas and movements
Open Access (free)
Rainer Bauböck

Rogers M. Smith . Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press : 149–165 . Habermas , Jürgen . 1986 . Between Facts and Norms . Cambridge : MIT Press . Hayduk , Ron . 2005 . Democracy for All: Restoring Immigrant Voting in the United States . New York : Routledge . Hobden , Christine . 2015 . “ States, Citizens, and Global Justice: The Political Channels of

in Democratic inclusion
Open Access (free)
Seas, oceans and civilisations
Jeremy C.A. Smith

unthreatening treaty with the British. Steering a fine strategic line between French and British interests in East Africa, the Omani prince-​merchant Sa’id bin Sultan Al Bu Sa’idi (1807–​56) was able to sustain an increasingly independent sphere of Omani power and influence in the Indian Ocean. Oman could establish trade relations with the United States, France and Portugal while remaining faithful to the treaty with Britain. Sa’id bin Sultan moved his capital to Zanzibar and from there opened up the extensive and lucrative clove trade. Exposure to European imperial rivalries

in Debating civilisations
Open Access (free)
A power perspective on Arctic governance
Elana Wilson Rowe

have illustrated, the end of the Cold War dissolved a geopolitical imaginary of the globe as neatly divided between two superpowers. In this imaginary, the Arctic was a frozen front between the United States and the Soviet Union (Dittmer et al., 2011; Powell and Dodds, 2014; Steinberg et al., 2015). Lines of interest, cooperation and conflict that are exceedingly more complex and intertwined have replaced the Cold War geopolitical images of a spatial ‘Iron Curtain’ and a world divided, but stable, between the forces of Communism and democracy (Murphy et al., 2004; O

in Arctic governance
Jürgen Habermas and the European left
Robert Fine and Philip Spencer

, respect for treaties, non-intervention in the internal affairs of other peoples, agreed norms regulating the conduct of war – but emphasised the need to elaborate international law in accordance with more cosmopolitan principles: states are bound to honour human rights; the principle of non-intervention may be suspended in the case of serious atrocities; and the authority of international organisations such as the United Nations must be upheld. Habermas defended

in Antisemitism and the left
Robert Fine and Philip Spencer

itself that does not provoke ideologically driven responses. Suffice to say that in Israel we find a state that was brought into being in reaction to the near-destruction of those designated Jews, authorised by the international community through the United Nations, confronted by the hostility of other newly independent states which defined themselves as ‘Arab’ and which denied the legitimacy of a ‘Jewish’ state. Its population was swollen by

in Antisemitism and the left