A national ethics committee and bioethics during the 1990s

in a series of lectures at the University of Edinburgh, which were published in 2002 as Autonomy and Trust in Bioethics. She claimed here that: Although the decades since the beginning of contemporary ­bioethics  have seen a lot of effort to improve the trustworthiness of public institutions and of experts, culminating in the UK in the additional demands for accountability, audit and openness of the 1990s, this is quite compatible with a decline in public trust, and specifically with a decline of public trust in medicine, science and biotechnology.173 O

in The making of British bioethics
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to her soldier patients. She found herself – as a coopted member of the BEF – more or less entrapped within the bounds of her military service. This sense of being confined – of being unable to act with autonomy or determine one’s own fate – seems to have been typical of members of the ‘official’ military nursing services, particularly when on active service overseas.13 As a guest member of the BEF in France, Fitzgerald commented on the restrictions of military service, observing that any individual who joins the army ‘weaves himself or herself into a cocoon of red

in Nurse Writers of the Great War
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books such as Easeful Death, she now claimed that it was ‘inhumane’ to deny people the right to die.8 She argued that this included not only terminally ill patients, but also individuals who felt they were a burden on their families due to disability or old age.9 When it came to assisted dying, Warnock argued, doctors had a pressing duty, ‘unless their religion forbids it’, to respect the autonomy of dying, elderly and disabled patients.10 In a 2008 column for the Observer, she stressed that ‘we have a moral obligation to take other people’s seriously reached

in The making of British bioethics
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Individual professional autonomy certainly remains important to practitioners, and a significant proportion of newly qualified doctors are choosing occupations according to their control over working hours and conditions. 60 However, unaided clinical autonomy is no longer prized as it once was, and engaging with external input and critique has become essential to good practice. Undoubtedly, therefore, being a professional means something different at the beginning of the twenty-first century to what it did at the beginning of the twentieth, and the transformations in

in Managing diabetes, managing medicine

in, that of supervising doctors, and telling them what to do, quite apart from them being Germans’.33 This reversal of professional order was also described by Sister Mary Sands, a QA who arrived, probably with 32 CCS, soon after the liberation.34 The nursing sisters had significant autonomy in their duties. Sister Kathleen Elvidge wrote home: ‘There is one English doctor to each square of five blocks, so as you can imagine we don’t see much of her. Then we have some Belgian medical students who also help, I’ve got two assigned to my block.’35 The official

in Negotiating nursing
Open Access (free)
Managing diabetes, managing medicine

curtail professional autonomy through private-sector accountability techniques. 25 Such broad-stroke accounts, however, have often downplayed the role of healthcare professionals in constructing the means for their own management, or have portrayed them as successfully restrained or co-opted by the state. To be sure, competing analyses have contradicted arguments of state success. Here, scholars have suggested that medical professionals responded effectively to political and administrative pressures, moving to maintain control over collective

in Managing diabetes, managing medicine

economic autonomy among members. However, some co-operators argue that co-ordinated state support can amplify the effectiveness of co-operative activities, while others view the state as a threat to the voluntary nature of co-operation. For Lionel Smith-Gordon, who conducted a review of co-operation across different national contexts for the Irish movement, the success of the Danish co-operative dairying sector provided ‘an example of the right way of combining State encouragement with the principle of self-help’. The Danish state exercised ‘its authority only to give

in Civilising rural Ireland

provide autonomy and status for scientific researchers working in government service. The fact that the discourse on science and development that emerged in the 1940s could encompass both the idea of research as the basis of planning and research as an activity in which freedom for researchers was paramount was possible because of the multiple meanings that could be attached to the idea of fundamental research. This was a concept of considerable political utility. Research and colonial development after 1940 In 1938, the

in Science at the end of empire

posting, many nursing sisters had some experience of the horror of wounds caused by industrial weaponry. However, as suggested in the quotation above, the exigencies of active service, including the often limited access to medical officers, demanded innovative and rapid nursing responses to the life-­threatening injuries of an increasingly technological war.2 Using surgical nursing in war as a ‘case study’ for developments in nursing practices and professional autonomy, the chapter examines the changes to the domain of their work by nursing sisters on active service

in Negotiating nursing
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Perceiving, describing and modelling child development

regarded as an extension of psychiatric authority, but rather as part of a wider change that has ensured the legal rights of children to express their individuality and autonomy. This book explores the changes that this has effected in our understanding of child development. The growth of the autism category has been accompanied by a belief that there is a biochemical reality in differences in children’s responses to parents and to

in The metamorphosis of autism