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engage in politics at all … lets himself EDKINS 9781526119032 PRINT.indd 29 22/02/2019 08:34 30 change and the politics of certainty in for the diabolical forces lurking in all violence’.4 The previous year’s convention, the first since September 11, had been surprisingly silent on the implications of the events of six months before. It was almost as if nothing had happened. On the flight home from this one, people were animated: trying to persuade themselves that Smith could not have been right – or that if he was, he shouldn’t have used his speech to make this

in Change and the politics of certainty

194 change and the politics of certainty 10 From one world to another Changing class is like emigrating from one side of the world to the other, where you have to rescind your passport, learn a new language and make gargantuan efforts if you are not to lose touch completely with the people and habits of your old life. – Lynsey Hanley1 It is time to write again about my own experience. The book began with an essay written in response to a request from Naeem Inayatullah at a dinner after his talk in Aberystwyth in March 2007, and it was first published in 2011

in Change and the politics of certainty
Open Access (free)

12 change and the politics of certainty 1 1 Objects among objects I came into the world imbued with the will to find a meaning in things, my spirit filled with the desire to attain to the source of the world, and then I found that I was an object in the midst of other objects. – Frantz Fanon, Black Skin, White Masks2 When she died in 1989 at the age of 101, my grandmother left few possessions. She had lived since she was in her sixties in a room in my parent’s various houses, so there wasn’t much space for personal property. Her most treasured objects were

in Change and the politics of certainty
The first child-witch in Rothenburg, 1587

3 ‘One cannot … hope to obtain the slightest certainty from him’: the first child-witch in Rothenburg, 1587 It is, of course, only with the benefit of hindsight that we can draw conclusions about the relative restraint with which the council in Rothenburg treated witchcraft during the early modern period; this restraint was never a foregone conclusion in any particular witch-trial. The intricate web of factors which accounted for it could be tested to the limits in certain cases when an individual’s story of witchcraft and the manner in which the council chose

in Witchcraft narratives in Germany

European cities in which its operational centres are based, and will the International Rescue Committee move from its New York headquarters to Dakar, Jakarta or Quito? At the moment, the answer of most major relief groups is implied by their stasis: no. But some measure of devolution appears necessary if they are to retain legitimacy. The gravest political challenge NGOs face lies not in what is going on in the Global South but rather what is going on at home in the Global North, particularly in Europe. If humanitarian certainties have been upended, it

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Editor’s Introduction

argues ( Champy, 2018: 17 ), ‘when action is required in highly singular and complex situations, common solutions that can be automatically inferred from routines, rules or scientific knowledge, might lead to mistakes and damages. Indeed, the singularity of the situation may imply that… the situation does not allow for a high degree of certainty’. In such situations, transmission of knowledge between peers is critical. The first two articles of this issue remind us of the importance of considering side by

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs

) to grant me a vision in which certain truths were revealed. A partisan of epistemological restraint would suggest that I might be absolutely convinced of the veridical nature of this revelation while nevertheless admitting that others could reasonably reject my evidence. But is this really plausible? If I concede that I have no way of convincing others, should that not also lead to a dent in my own certainty?7 For Barry, then, everything hinges on the extent to which the agent’s inner convictions can legitimately withstand his or her failure to persuade others

in The culture of toleration in diverse societies
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Recognition, Vulnerability and the International

in which we reside; it seeks also to understand the ways we come to know and the desires that underpin the philosophical journey towards comprehension (Kochi 2012 : 130). These desires are ‘often self-interested, culturally contingent and manipulative’ (Kochi 2012 : 130) and include the pursuit of security and certainty. Deeply rooted in liberal capitalist society, these desires are incompatible with Hegel

in Recognition and Global Politics
Rothenburg, 1561–1652

Given the widespread belief in witchcraft and the existence of laws against such practices, why did witch-trials fail to gain momentum and escalate into ‘witch-crazes’ in certain parts of early modern Europe? This book answers this question by examining the rich legal records of the German city of Rothenburg ob der Tauber, a city that experienced a very restrained pattern of witch-trials and just one execution for witchcraft between 1561 and 1652. The book explores the factors that explain the absence of a ‘witch-craze’ in Rothenburg, placing particular emphasis on the interaction of elite and popular priorities in the pursuit (and non-pursuit) of alleged witches at law. By making the witchcraft narratives told by the peasants and townspeople of Rothenburg central to its analysis, the book also explores the social and psychological conflicts that lay behind the making of accusations and confessions of witchcraft. Furthermore, it challenges the existing explanations for the gender-bias of witch-trials, and also offers insights into other areas of early modern life, such as experiences of and beliefs about communal conflict, magic, motherhood, childhood and illness. Written in a narrative style, the study invites a wide readership to share in the drama of early modern witch trials.

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, incompletely. Perhaps he wants the reader to see selfinflicted horrors in Leonora’s face, to guess at others, but perhaps he also simply wants him or her to wait, with Dowell, in that imperfect tense, delaying certainty. In Parade’s End (summarised later in this chapter), Ford’s war tetralogy, sight fragments the narrative/cognitive levels, sometimes more completely. When Valentine sees Edith Duchemin ‘mad before her’, an explanation follows: Edith wants to know about abortion. With this sexual shock Valentine’s fantasy of ‘bright colonies of beings, chaste, beautiful in

in Fragmenting modernism