Search results

You are looking at 11 - 14 of 14 items for :

  • humanitarian history x
  • Literature and Theatre x
Clear All
Open Access (free)
Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Sarah Grand and the sexual education of girls
Janet Beer and Ann Heilmann

Perkins Gilman, ‘Economic Basis of the Woman Question’, 1898, collected in Aileen S. Kraditor (ed.),Up from the Pedestal: Selected Writings in the History of American Feminism, Chicago, Quadrangle Books, 1968, pp. 175–6. Sarah Grand, The Heavenly Twins, London, Heinemann, [1893] 1908, pp. 403, xi. Hereafter HT. Charlotte Perkins Gilman, The Man-Made World or, Our Androcentric Culture, New York, Johnson Reprint Corporation, [1911] 1971, p. 134. Hereafter MMW. For the evangelical roots of much of nineteenth-century feminism see Jane Rendall, The Origins of Modern Feminism

in Special relationships
Anu Koivunen, Katariina Kyrölä, and Ingrid Ryberg

this vulnerability is shared, and by whom? Why is #MeToo having an impact only now, with wealthy and often white cis-​women in Hollywood at the forefront of the movement, when the issue of sexual abuse and assault has been a key struggle in feminist, women of colour, and trans activisms for such a long time? What part does social media play in the successes and failures of activist efforts such as #MeToo, and how does it relate to broader media histories of addressing and representing painful issues and marginalised people? One of the keys to the success of the

in The power of vulnerability
Open Access (free)
Jonathan Atkin

that of men – even when sharing an enlightened, liberal background with them, as within Bloomsbury and its circle. But women emerged from a range of backgrounds and contexts – including that of political agitation linked to specific political aims – whose motivation towards protest, when confronted by the specifics of war, became more individualistic in character and less a part of an organised ‘movement’ or liable to be led by the propaganda of the war-state. Many women in the period leading up to the outbreak of the conflict could lay claim to a history of

in A war of individuals
Open Access (free)
Jonathan Atkin

Artist. Unlike Duncan Grant and David Garnett, the writer Clive Bell was less hampered by tribunals and the machinery of authority and hence able to have more freedom to undertake his own work during the war due to a medical complaint (an ‘unhealed rupture’) that rendered him unfit for military service. However, until the necessities of the Military Service Act brought his medical history to the fore, he existed ‘in a world of agitation and uneasiness which is not at all what I like’, as he described to his wife Vanessa. He was unsure about ‘venturing out’ and hesitant

in A war of individuals