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(AusAID) Office of Indigenous Women (ATSIC) Women and Sport Unit (ASC) Women’s Bureau (DEET) Affirmative Action Agency Work and Family Unit; Equal Pay Unit (DIR) Sex Discrimination Commissioner and Unit (HREOC) Rural Women’s Unit (DPIE) Women’s Policy Unit (DSS) Key: ABS — Australian Bureau of Statistics; ASC — Australian Sports Commission; ATSIC — Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission; AusAID — Australian Agency for International Development; DEET — Department of Employment, Education and Training; DHS&H — Department of Human Services and Health; DIR

in Mainstreaming gender, democratizing the state?

Races Congress. Schreiner was notable in humanitarian circles as one politician who had resisted the colour bar in the Union Constitution, albeit unsuccessfully. None of the prime ministers would have welcomed reminders of social justice and equity issues relating to their Indigenous peoples in countries the whiteness of which they asserted at every turn. The leaders of Australia, Canada and New Zealand

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
Open Access (free)
An allegory of imperial rapport

Britain. 27 Yet they also signal its declining relevance in an increasingly multicultural society with the narrow focus on the ‘Anglo’ white male dissipating in the films of the 1990s and beyond. Felicity Collins and Therese Davis demonstrate the rupture that the Mabo decision of 1992 (a High Court decision that allowed Indigenous Australians to claim their land rights) brought to Australian cinema, 28 introducing a

in The British monarchy on screen
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‘A vote the same as any other person’

As the colonies attained self-government the Colonial Office stepped aside from its responsibilities to protect the rights of Indigenous peoples, dissipating the influence of the APS and other humanitarian organisations that were now compelled to campaign on a multitude of fronts in their attempts to influence settler governments. In the local legislatures the language was

in Equal subjects, unequal rights

East Timor in the creation and perpetuation of a pattern of severe and embedded abuse. That failure to pay attention to concrete circumstances marked the ‘realism’ of the prevailing international attitudes on East Timor; to what extent might it also characterise the current liberal approaches? The third case study, which looks at the ‘place’ of Indigenous Australians within Australian political life, returns to a liberal rights focus – in this case not involving the language of international rights talk but rather concerning the ideals

in Human rights and the borders of suffering
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Afterword Rima D. Apple Nursing has been and is shaped by factors internal to the profession as well as external influences such as governmental concerns; cultural sensibilities; racism, sexism and classism; physical and geographical conditions; and economics. Viewed from the vantage point of imperialism, nurses can be seen as straddling the metropole and the periphery, or bridging the gap between Western and indigenous medicine. Nurses were both icons and actors in this world. They provided nursing care and health instruction, and in that sense their work

in Colonial caring
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Contextualising colonial and post-colonial nursing

four chapters begin to examine the embedding of Western-style nursing culture into indigenous cultures. These chapters widen our scope beyond the British Empire to include not only Australia and New Zealand, but also the Dutch East Indies and the American colonies of Puerto Rico and the Philippines. Issues such as racism and clashes of culture now come to the fore. The tensions between colonial nurses and their ‘Western’ culture of medicine and the traditional practices of indigenous trainees 3 Helen Sweet and Sue Hawkins and their patients are examined, as are

in Colonial caring
Open Access (free)

himself to inaugurate the new Australian parliament and to convey Britain’s appreciation for imperial service to the ongoing South African War. George and Mary participated in a remarkably similar itinerary of events, from reviews of imperial troops to entertainment by indigenous peoples. Extolling the birth of a new imperial century, newspapers, and subsequently colonial subjects, across the British world

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
Disease, conflict and nursing in the British Empire, 1880–1914

, Colonel (Sir) William Williams sought her advice on the formation of an Army Nursing Service Reserve (ANSR) that was to be attached 41 Angharad Fletcher to the New South Wales Army Medical Corps (NSWAMC). Three months later, Gould had amassed twenty-six nurses and assumed the post of lady superintendent. On 17 January 1900 she, along with thirteen nursing sisters, left Australia to participate in the Second Boer War (1899–1902), serving at hospitals in Sterkstroom, Kroonstad, Johannesburg and Ermelo, often beside Buller, the Rhodesian ridgeback that had become the

in Colonial caring
Open Access (free)

claims of rights. This dominant construction of human rights establishes a quite particular way of imagining and constituting both the individual person and the political community or relationship. In so doing, it also highlights a narrow, if significant, range of political injury. The attributes and aspirations of the highly abstracted conceptualisation of the individual subject produced by this approach become the yardstick for the universal, but it is a yardstick that for many people – Indigenous youths in Australian jails or low-caste women

in Human rights and the borders of suffering