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The management of migration between care and control

For example, A. Estevez , ‘ The Politics of Death and Asylum Discourse: Constituting Migration Politics from the Periphery ’, Alternatives , 39 : 2 ( 2014 ), pp. 75 – 89 ; Vaughan-Williams, ‘Borderwork beyond Inside/Outside?’; V. Squire , ‘ Governing Migration through Death in Europe and the US: Identification, Burial, and the Crisis of Modern Humanism ’, European Journal of International Relations (16 March

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
From starving children to satirical saviours

, including Save the Children, Oxfam and Christian Aid. 4 The campaign broadly aimed to tackle extreme international hunger by rallying the British public to use their national citizenship to pressure their MPs, prime minister and chancellor to take political action on aid, tax avoidance, biofuels and government transparency. Due to a limited financial budget, the Enough Food IF campaign organisers predominantly communicated their

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
Offline and online games, branding and humanitarianism at the Roskilde Festival

.), Celebrity Humanitarianism and North-South Relations: Politics, Place and Power ( London and New York : Routledge , 2015 ), pp. 170 – 88 ; Biccum, ‘Marketing Development’; J . Street , ‘ Celebrity Politicians: Popular Culture and Political Representation ’, British Journal of Politics and International Relations , 6 : 4 ( 2004 ), pp. 435 – 52 ; D . Lewis , D . Rodgers

in Global humanitarianism and media culture

political consumerism as a channel for a humanitarian impulse? Can the everyday practice of consumption be a space of care and concern for international justice? In this chapter, I bring these questions to the analysis of the consumption of children’s toys and the online discussions of boycotting ‘unsafe’ toys. I explore how a neoliberal parenting culture in the West, which promotes a highly individualised

in Global humanitarianism and media culture

This collection interrogates the representation of humanitarian crisis and catastrophe, and the refraction of humanitarian intervention and action, from the mid-twentieth century to the present, across a diverse range of media forms: traditional and contemporary screen media (film, television and online video) as well as newspapers, memoirs, music festivals and social media platforms (such as Facebook, YouTube and Flickr). The book thus explores the historical, cultural and political contexts that have shaped the mediation of humanitarian relationships since the middle of the twentieth century. Together, the chapters illustrate the continuities and connections, as well as the differences, which have characterised the mediatisation of both states of emergency and acts of amelioration. The authors reveal and explore the significant synergies between the humanitarian enterprise, the endeavour to alleviate the suffering of particular groups, and media representations, and their modes of addressing and appealing to specific publics. The chapters consider the ways in which media texts, technologies and practices reflect and shape the shifting moral, political, ethical, rhetorical, ideological and material dimensions of international humanitarian emergency and intervention, and have become integral to the changing relationships between organisations, institutions, governments, individual actors and entire sectors.

2013, the 120,000 Syrians were living within a melting pot of aid workers, journalists, visiting politicians and celebrities. 9 Through extensive experience of working with media in Za’atari, news reports from international English-language media and academic literature, this chapter looks at the portrayal of children in media coverage of the camp. By analysing how reporting on children’s issues

in Global humanitarianism and media culture
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Theorising Arctic hierarchies

3 Power positions: theorising Arctic hierarchies International relations scholars of the twentieth century operated primarily with a conception of states’ interrelations as little more than billiard balls bouncing and crashing in trade, war and other forms of encounter. They posited anarchy as the only option in the absence of formal authority at the international level (Milner, 1991). In more recent history, IR scholars have sought to envision the international order as something more than anarchic and explain structured, repeated modes of interaction

in Arctic governance
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We now explore the term ‘equality’, defined in two ways: first, that which concerns equality as a starting point to life; second, equality as an outcome. We also consider equality before the law, equal political rights and equal social rights. After that we examine individual and group equality, and equality in terms of the class structure and international relations. Finally

in Understanding political ideas and movements
Order and security in post-Cold War Europe

system-transforming effects in international relations.12 In attempting to respond appropriately to the new conceptual and, eventually, policy challenges, we must do more than merely add new issues to the global agenda. Our thinking about the nature and pursuit of security must change. The attempt to understand the new European order and security should take account of its geographical and functional scope, its degree of institutionalisation, its strength and fragility and its ideological and normative elements. While the collapse of the Soviet bloc and accelerating

in Theory and reform in the European Union
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uncrystallised in its political superstructure, the Union remains an integrative venture whose final destination is yet to become discernible. Attributes such as ‘partial polity’ and ‘part-formed political system’ clearly demonstrate the lack of confident scholarly assertion,9 while rendering the whole enterprise ‘a challenge to the continuing separation of international relations from political science’.10 But even without taking into account the series of neologisms invented over time to capture the distinctive properties that make up its governance structures, the

in Theory and reform in the European Union