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Open Access (free)
Environmental justice and citizen science in a post-truth age
Editors: Thom Davies and Alice Mah

This book examines the relationship between environmental justice and citizen science, focusing on enduring issues and new challenges in a post-truth age. Debates over science, facts, and values have always been pivotal within environmental justice struggles. For decades, environmental justice activists have campaigned against the misuses of science, while at the same time engaging in community-led citizen science. However, post-truth politics has threatened science itself. This book makes the case for the importance of science, knowledge, and data that are produced by and for ordinary people living with environmental risks and hazards. The international, interdisciplinary contributions range from grassroots environmental justice struggles in American hog country and contaminated indigenous communities, to local environmental controversies in Spain and China, to questions about “knowledge justice,” citizenship, participation, and data in citizen science surrounding toxicity. The book features inspiring studies of community-based participatory environmental health and justice research; different ways of sensing, witnessing, and interpreting environmental injustice; political strategies for seeking environmental justice; and ways of expanding the concepts and forms of engagement of citizen science around the world. While the book will be of critical interest to specialists in social and environmental sciences, it will also be accessible to graduate and postgraduate audiences. More broadly, the book will appeal to members of the public interested in social justice issues, as well as community members who are thinking about participating in citizen science and activism. Toxic Truths includes distinguished contributing authors in the field of environmental justice, alongside cutting-edge research from emerging scholars and community activists.

Open Access (free)
Barbara Prainsack and Sabina Leonelli

, 2016). Social inequalities have been reified; even most left-wing progressive movements no longer see them as something that needs to be abolished but instead as something to be managed. Within this political economy, openness – particularly when interpreted as an appeal to transparency as means to unmask inequalities and corruption – assumes the role that gallantry had in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries: while seemingly easing the relationship between women and men, but not also between the rich and the poor, it can also be associated with a system that

in Science and the politics of openness
Open Access (free)
Religious influences on the depictions of science in mainstream movies
David A. Kirby and Amy C. Chambers

16 Playing God: religious influences on the depictions of science in mainstream movies David A. Kirby, Amy C. Chambers Research on public attitudes towards science has revealed that individuals’ personal values and belief system are crucial factors in determining how they respond to new developments in science, technology and medicine, such as nanotechnology (Brossard et al., 2009; Nisbet and Scheufele, 2009; Scheufele et al., 2009; Toumey, 2011). Few cultural institutions have more influence on personal values and belief systems than religion, and few cultural

in Science and the politics of openness
Open Access (free)
M. Anne Brown

EAST TIMOR WAS forcibly incorporated into Indonesia in 1975 and managed, through a confluence of circumstances that was at once remarkable and yet another example of a suppressed people snapping back like bent but unbroken twigs (to use Isaiah Berlin’s phrase), to become independent almost twenty-five years later. Now the territory, poised on the edge of statehood, is undergoing transition, but also flux and confusion. At the time of writing the United Nations Transitional Authority for East Timor (UNTAET) is effectively the Government of

in Human rights and the borders of suffering
Open Access (free)
The beast that no-one could – or should – control?
Stephen Curry

because academics are largely ignorant of the cost of journal subscriptions, which are Open access 41 normally managed on their behalf by university librarians. Although the direction of travel is away from subscription models towards a totally open-access world, the details of the transition remain obscure and mired in enduring arguments between various stakeholders. Economic modelling suggests that a fully open-access publishing system could deliver savings by creating a market where there is genuine competition for publishing services (Swan and Houghton, 2012

in Science and the politics of openness
Competing imaginaries of science and social order in responsible (research and) innovation
Stevienna de Saille and Paul Martin

200805. Beal, T. K. (2014). Religion and Its Monsters. New York: Routledge. Berg, P. (2008). Meetings that changed the world: Asilomar 1975 – DNA modification secured. Nature, 455(7211), 290–291. Botting, F. (2003). Metaphors and monsters. Journal for Cultural Research, 7(4), 339–365. Braidotti, R. (1996). Signs of wonder and traces of doubt: On teratology and embodied differences. In N. Lykke and R. Braidotti (eds), Between Monsters, Goddesses and Cyborgs: Feminist Confrontations with Science, Medicine and Cyberspace (pp. 135–152). London: Zed. Bruening, G., and Lyons

in Science and the politics of openness
New Labour and public sector reform
Eric Shaw

, crucial roles were performed by the three key (and interlinked) elements of the so-called ‘quasi-market’, choice, competition and commercial involvement in supply. Choice Labour’s 1945 settlement was (in Tony Blair’s words) ‘largely statedirected and managed, built on a paternalist relationship between state and individual, one of donor and recipient [one in which] personal preferences were a low or non-existent priority’ (Blair 2002). The outcome was an asymmetrical power relationship in which user needs and preferences were often neglected. There were two available

in In search of social democracy
M. Anne Brown

see that the extent to which people incorporate medical advice is not the responsibility of the patient alone. It’s a problem of the doctor–patient relationship’. For Anderson, a Koori medical practitioner trained in conventional Western medicine, health practices in a community of both Indigenous and non-Indigenous people must involve processes of mutual recognition and negotiation of ‘healing strategies’ (1994: 42). In this context the operation of the community-managed Aboriginal Medical Service is particularly important. A loose national

in Human rights and the borders of suffering
From the development of a national surveillance system to the birth of an international network
Roberto Pasetto and Ivano Iavarone

network 205 become more automated, thus reducing the number of manual jobs and increasing unemployment. This has led to a higher level of individual and social conflicts affecting many parts of residents’ lives: the economy, the environment, and the health services. As a result, the local situation has become increasingly chaotic and difficult to manage. The epidemiological monitoring system of sites of national interest for remediation In Italy, the situation of contaminated sites is not unique to Gela: throughout the past few years the Istituto Superiore di Sanità

in Toxic truths
UK and Swiss initiatives to open up animal laboratory research
Carmen M. McLeod

boundaries of openness and secrecy. They argue that, in the Swedish context, AR openness initiatives are often carefully stage-managed so as to allow what they term ‘selective openness’ in order to control (and preserve) existing power relations between science and the public. McLeod and Hobson-West (2015) suggest that, in contrast, openness initiatives in the UK, at least, are allied towards ‘cautious openness’, potentially allowing for greater input from interested members of the public. However, their research also highlights the variation in the discursive framing of

in Science and the politics of openness