Elite beliefs about witchcraft and magic

occasions when their activities were brought to the attention of the council by its subjects – in cases which occurred in 1663, 1671 and 1689.5 Unlike their subjects, however, who imagined that the ability of the witch to work magic depended on the supernatural powers and skills that she had acquired for herself, the Rothenburg elites believed that her maleficient powers depended in important ways on her relationship with the devil. Although doubtless current among the elites from an earlier date, the first written record of this 50 WITCHCRAFT NARRATIVES IN GERMANY

in Witchcraft narratives in Germany
The first child-witch in Rothenburg, 1587

belonging to Lorentz Dolmann and had drunk the wine stored there. Here the black man 82 WITCHCRAFT NARRATIVES IN GERMANY had given Hans’ mother a leather sack full of wine which she had taken home with her, and from which Hans and his mother had drunk their fill, giving his father, Martin Gackstatt, none of it. Then they had flown to the common meadow of the village, where the black man had played the pipes and they had danced near a tree called the Witches’ Tree. Other Hilgartshausen women, including Anna, the wife of Jörg Brodt, had accompanied them on the ride, and

in Witchcraft narratives in Germany
The idioms and risks of defiance in the trial of Margaretha Horn, 1652

tension between the two households to an open breach: Hans Horn and Gackstatt almost came to blows over the alleged fleamaking ritual, armed with a hoe and axe, respectively, while it prompted their 182 WITCHCRAFT NARRATIVES IN GERMANY wives and children to taunt and throw stones at each other.6 Hans Horn tried in vain to restore accord between the households through the mediation of neighbours in May, then – presumably in desperation, as it was a high-risk strategy – reported to the council in Rothenburg in late June that Gackstatt had accused one of his own sons of

in Witchcraft narratives in Germany
Open Access (free)

2395 Ch1 7/5/02 8:39 am Page 20 1 The narrative push In this chapter the relationship between fragmentation, repression and writing will be explored. Some of the less obvious contributing factors for Ford’s first volume of autobiography (Ancient Lights) will also be examined. Close attention will be paid to the historical context that helped to produce Ancient Lights – discussed briefly in the Introduction and again in Chapter 5. Necessarily brief in its attention to some major issues (notably the First World War, addressed in Chapter 4), this is primarily

in Fragmenting modernism

. Yet for today’s folklorist or oral historian, this context represents unknown territory. Without information concerning their social setting and underlying motivations, practices aimed at magical harm may appear as dark, mysterious, anti-social events completely divorced from normal, everyday social interaction and experience, or opposed to social integration and cohesion. In this chapter I draw upon over 300 narratives

in Witchcraft Continued
Open Access (free)
Interpreting Violence on Healthcare in the Early Stage of the South Sudanese Civil War

violence on health facilities and personnel is primarily, if not exclusively, motivated by belligerents’ intent to deprive their enemy and its associated population of access to healthcare ( Rubenstein and Bittle, 2010 ; International Committee of the Red Cross, 2011 ). This article attempts to present a more complex picture and broaden understanding of the issue by providing a detailed narrative of episodes of violence affecting MSF-supported health structures, one that contextualises these violent incidents with regard for the dynamics of conflict in South Sudan as

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs

Written in the aftermath of the civil rights era’s expansive hopes, James Baldwin’s last novel, Just Above My Head (1979), examines a fundamental issue, the choice between hope and skepticism, or prophecy and doubt. Baldwin approaches this issue by questioning two cornerstone ideas of his fiction, the need for prophetic art and this art’s focus on anticipating a renovated society, often pictured in terms adapted from apocalyptic biblical texts and Gospel music lyrics. Just Above My Head is Baldwin’s fullest presentation of this kind of art and its linkage to apocalyptic hopes. He dramatizes these ideas in the art of his Gospel singer protagonist, particularly in a climactic scene of artistic dedication whose Gospel lyric envisions “tearing down the kingdom of this world.” Yet Baldwin also unsparingly questions these same ideas through plot and the blues-inflected skeptical-tragic consciousness of his narrator. Responding to a 1970s moment when hopes for transcendent justice seemed passé, Just Above My Head’s unique contribution is not to try to resolve the ideas it counterposes, but to face both the possible falseness of prophetic hope and our continuing need for it, and to present the necessity for choice in a final dream that holds the key to the novel’s meaning. In presenting this issue through a sustained double-voiced narrative that reexamines its author’s artistic practice and raises fundamental choices in outlook and conduct, Just Above My Head evidences the continuing artistic vitality of Baldwin’s late fiction.

James Baldwin Review
Searching for Black Queer Domesticity at Chez Baldwin

This essay argues for the importance of James Baldwin’s last house, located in St. Paul-de-Vence in the south of France, to his late works written during the productive period of 1971–87: No Name in the Street (1972), If Beale Street Could Talk (1974), The Devil Finds Work (1976), Just Above My Head (1979), The Evidence of Things Not Seen (1985), and the unpublished play The Welcome Table (1987). That period ushered in a new Baldwin, more complex and mature as an author, who became disillusioned while growing older as a black queer American who had no choice but to live abroad to get his work done and to feel safe. Having established his most enduring household at “Chez Baldwin,” as the property was known locally, the writer engaged in literary genre experimentation and challenged normative binaries of race, gender, and sexuality with his conceptions of spatially contingent national identity. The late Baldwin created unprecedented models of black queer domesticity and humanism that, having been excluded from U.S. cultural narratives until recently, offer novel ways to reconceptualize what it means to be an American intellectual in the twenty-first-century world.

James Baldwin Review
Open Access (free)
James Baldwin, Teju Cole, and Glenn Ligon

This essay uses Edward Said’s theory of affiliation to consider the relationship between James Baldwin and contemporary artists Teju Cole and Glenn Ligon, both of whom explicitly engage with their predecessor’s writing in their own work. Specifically, Baldwin’s essay “Stranger in the Village” (1953) serves a through-line for this discussion, as it is invoked in Cole’s essay “Black Body” and Ligon’s visual series, also titled Stranger in the Village. In juxtaposing these three artists, I argue that they express the dialectical energy of affiliation by articulating ongoing concerns of race relations in America while distinguishing themselves from Baldwin in terms of periodization, medium-specificity, and their broader relationship to Western art practice. In their adoption of Baldwin, Cole and Ligon also imagine a way beyond his historical anxieties and writing-based practice, even as they continue to reinscribe their own work with his arguments about the African-American experience. This essay is an intermedial study that reads fiction, nonfiction, language-based conceptual art and mixed media, as well as contemporary politics and social media in order consider the nuances of the African-American experience from the postwar period to our contemporary moment. Concerns about visuality/visibility in the public sphere, narrative voice, and self-representation, as well as access to cultural artifacts and aesthetic engagement, all emerge in my discussion of this constellation of artists. As a result, this essay identifies an emblematic, though not exclusive, strand of African-American intellectual thinking that has never before been brought together. It also demonstrates the ongoing relevance of Baldwin’s thinking for the contemporary political scene in this country.

James Baldwin Review
Editor’s Introduction

progress’ ( White House, 2017: 4 ). Renouncing progressive historical narratives, the Trump administration signals the end of the ‘American century’ and discards the particular universalism that has sustained liberal order. Posing direct, if distinct, challenges to US power, China and Russia do not seek to create an alternative to the multilateral system. On the contrary, they now become defenders of the institutions of liberal order, pointing to the humanitarian hypocrisy of the US. But as they vie for leadership of the multilateral system, they

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs