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The early British films of Joseph Losey
Neil Sinyard

with his own emotions, the consequence being that his research is contaminated by his lack of self-knowledge. The noticeable self-consciousness of the style, then, operates in an almost Brechtian way to pull you out of narrative involvement into a more contemplative relation to the film. As with Time Without Pity , Blind Date and Eve, the plot is the weakest, or the least important, part of the

in British cinema of the 1950s
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

’s thinking. Midway through the book, Stone imagines scenes of jungle combat between Americans and the North Vietnamese Army (NVA) almost as though he was wishing a destiny for himself and his nation that was already tilting towards a frightening reality. Indeed, these self-​absorbed imaginings of an impressionable young student were transformed at the end of 1967 on Stone’s entry into the US army, into the unforgiving reality of a stripped back infantryman who quickly had to adjust to the speed of combat, chaos of friendly fire and freezing effects of fear. The manuscript

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
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Memory and popular film
Paul Grainge

and forgetting in American culture – what is remembered, by who and for who – has in recent years become entwined in hegemonic struggles fought and figured around the negotiation of America’s national past. These struggles sharpened significantly in the late 1980s and early 1990s, a moment of reported ‘culture war’ where consensual narratives of American identity were (seen to be) challenged by an emergent

in Memory and popular film
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Fixing the past in English war films
Fred Inglis

fascism makes for stories with plot, point, moral grip and a powerful ending. Its constituents are to be found in the English war films of the 1950s. There we see narrative becoming history, biography turning into myth. It is important to add, at a time when much of a putting-down kind is levelled against present British society for its nostalgic attachment to myths of a self-bolstering kind, that by

in British cinema of the 1950s
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

and the moral as well as financial and C or po ration s legal corruption of money are explored further. However, in the central expository speech at the annual stockholders’ meeting of Teldar Paper, Gordon Gekko (Michael Douglas) asserts that greed will save the company and the malfunctioning corporation called the USA in one fell swoop. Retrospectively, Stone confirmed this scene as being one of the most important in the film. Corporate management was being lauded as some kind of superhero force in these years, and yet in reality it had become weak and self

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Consumerism and alienation in 1950s comedies
Dave Rolinson

cinema found a winning formula in the Doctor , Norman Wisdom and Carry On series, which were rooted in a rhetoric of consensus: ‘Uneven, loose or non-existent at the level of narrative, these films depended on the mise-en-scène of particular, isolated sequences which were paced specifically to create and deliver a sense of audience communality.’ 5 However, there is a

in British cinema of the 1950s
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Film festivals and the revival of Classic Hollywood
Julian Stringer

Film Studies has to date paid too little attention to the role cultural institutions play in the transformation of cinema history into heritage. At the dawn of cinema’s second century, a range of organisational bodies – including museums and art galleries, the publicity and promotion industries, film journalism and publishing, as well as the academy – work to activate and commodify memory narratives

in Memory and popular film
From Vietnam to the war in the Persian Gulf
John Storey

. . . Our troops will have the best possible support in the entire world. They will not be asked to fight with one hand tied behind their backs.’ 5 Bush was seeking to put to rest a spectre that had come to haunt America’s political and military self-image, what Richard Nixon and others had called the ‘Vietnam Syndrome’. 6 The debate over American foreign policy had, according to Nixon, been ‘grotesquely

in Memory and popular film
The Pony Express at the Diamond Jubilee
Heidi Kenaga

for the outbreak of war, Jack and Molly marry. 10 Like its predecessors, The Pony Express places a white couple at the forefront of this historical trajectory. Jack Slade’s privileging of self-interest and acquisition over national commitment takes on an explicitly racial cast in the film. His opportunistic collaboration with the Indians to raid passing covered wagon trains functions as a local

in Memory and popular film
Clare Woodford

as spectators are seen to acknowledge the authority of their own thoughts. With this in mind, I will turn back to Emerson to discuss how the perfectionist commitment to self-reliance is cultivated through “aversive thinking” and the positive role of dreaming within this. Finally, I will explore Dienstag’s wider claim about the value of films for democracy in general. Here I

in Cinema, democracy and perfectionism