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Redefining security in the Middle East
Tami Amanda Jacoby and Brent E. Sasley

the meaning of and possibilities for security in the Middle East in two fundamental ways. First, it seeks to broaden the field to include the new issues, challenges, actors, relations and units of analysis that have arisen in the post-Cold War era. New threats and dangers in the Middle East are articulated in relation to environmental risk, terrorism, fundamentalist movements, structural violence

in Redefining security in the Middle East
A dialogue with Islam as a pattern of conflict resolution and a security approach vis-à-vis Islamism
Bassam Tibi

. Political Islam and post-bipolar security in the Middle East As a recent development, the politicization of religion is not restricted to Islam, insofar as it can be observed in other religions as well, be it Hinduism or Judaism – among others. 3 When it comes to Islam one cannot escape witnessing the Bin Laden and, earlier, the Iran connection of terrorism. 4 In Algeria the

in Redefining security in the Middle East
Evolution of the normative basis
Eşref Aksu

preferences of key actors interacted in intra-state peacekeeping environments in the early 1960s, and juxtapose the ensuing normative synthesis with the ideational attributes of the 1990s, which took shape in a different historical structural setting. Emerging normative basis on the eve of double ‘peaks’ The emergence of UN peacekeeping missions can be traced almost as far back as

in The United Nations, intra-state peacekeeping and normative change
Iver B. Neumann

state. Furthermore, in Europe, given that the European Union is a reality, the structural similarity between the traditional platforms from which the EU is being composed make for a structural conflict almost everywhere. Those who welcome globalisation also, as a rule, welcome integration, whereas those who oppose the one generally oppose the other as well. If national–post-national as the main political

in Mapping European security after Kosovo
Heikki Patomäki

The Agenda for Democratisation emphasises that although ‘interrupted by the Cold War’, democratisation in accordance with the spirit of the UN Charter is also about ‘the project of democratic international organisations.’ 18 ‘A supportive international environment for democracy’ requires, in the post-Cold War situation and the context of globalisation

in Mapping European security after Kosovo
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Reflections in a distorting mirror
Christoph Zürcher

This is not a text about who was wrong and who was right; neither is it a text which aims to establish the true figures of those killed and displaced by Russian or NATO bombs. It is a tale of two conflicts that share some remarkable similarities and which are to some extent archetypal for our globalised post-Cold War world. It is, above all, an essay about two conflicts which are

in Mapping European security after Kosovo
Water scarcity, the 1980s’ Palestinian uprising and implications for peace
Jeffrey Sosland

quality are on the decline. Growing demand and scarce supplies have been problems for the region for the past half-century ( Lonergan and Brooks, 1994 ). This case shows how structural scarcity evolves and how the resulting environmental scarcity, along with weak domestic institutions, played an important role in the advent of the intifada . On 9 December 1987, an

in Redefining security in the Middle East
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Virtuousness, virtuality and virtuosity in NATO’s representation of the Kosovo campaign
Andreas Behnke

place’ needs, instead, to be understood as the articulation of two distinct, yet related, observations about the nature of organised violence in the new world order. Or, as this term is by now consigned to the dustbin of history, the post-Cold War order ( perhaps best abbreviated as PoCoWO). Both observations are relevant for the critical engagement with ‘war’ beyond the case of the Gulf War. As I

in Mapping European security after Kosovo
Paul Latawski and Martin A. Smith

moved to Phase 3 12 would have required the full consent of the NAC. There is some ambiguity about the nature of the post-Phase 2 stage of operations … our informal discussions would suggest that the formal decision to move to strategic bombing of Serbia was never put directly, in quite those terms, to the NAC. Rather, an extension of the delegation to the Secretary General

in The Kosovo crisis and the evolution of post-Cold War European security
Eşref Aksu

this stage, the prominent role played by Portugal, the Soviet Union and the United States was perhaps a symbolic reminder of the continuing structural influence exerted upon the conflict by decolonisation and Cold War concerns. The solution to the Angola conflict would have to reflect a particular resolution of these concerns in the light of the changing power configuration in world politics

in The United Nations, intra-state peacekeeping and normative change